CANCER DOCTOR IS A FRAUD…

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Dr. Farid Fata the $35 Million FRAUDULENT doctor practicing in Michigan was telling people they had cancer even when they didn’t. Continue reading

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CBD.. ABC? Which is what and What is CBD?


cbd diamond general

Let the experts spell it all out for you

The benefits are so amazing

Organic and natural.

  • CBD is a natural constituent of hemp that has been shown to have positive health benefits, without causing psychoactive effects.
  • CBD-rich hemp provides a legal alternative to medical marijuana and allows the consumer to enjoy the benefits of CBD without the risk of getting high.
  • Since CBD has no psychoactive effect, it is an excellent option for people seeking the benefits of cannabis products without breaking federal law or risking impairment.
CBD Health Benefits:

CBD has been the subject of several health-related studies. Here are the TOP 6.

  1. A 2015 study found that CBD may be neuprotective in adult and neonatal ischemia, brain trauma, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s chorea, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Lou Gehrig’s disease).
  2. A 2013 study found that in two groups of people who wished to quit smoking, those treated with CBD reduced the number of cigarettes smoked by approximately 40%.
  3. CBD was administered after onset of clinical symptoms, and in both models of arthritis the treatment effectively blocked progression of arthritis.
  4. A 2014 study found that CBD is a potent “universal” anti-acne agent which possesses the ability to reduce the occurrence of three primary types of acne.
  5. According to several scientific studies including Natural cannabinoids, such as CBD (cannabidiol), have been shown in research to have therapeutic possibilities in helping diabetes.
  6. Generalized Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD) is one of the most common anxiety conditions with impairment in social life. In a 2011 study, CBD was shown to reduce anxiety induced by simulated public speaking.

 

Don’t forget about your Pets. Amazing results.

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Everyone and Every Living Animal Can Benefit

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ARE YOU SEXUALLY ACTIVE…


DID YOU KNOW THERE ARE 10 COMMON STD’s

HIV type 1 & type 2 antibody/antigen (4th gen), herpes type 1 & type 2, hepatitis A, hepatitis B & hepatitis C, chlamydia, gonorrhea and syphilis

 

If you are wondering what an STD is:

An STD is a sexually transmitted disease; an infection that is transmitted through oral, vaginal or anal sex, intravenous drug use or through nonsexual contact such as childbirth or breastfeeding. According to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates, there are 19 million reported STD cases each year in the United States. STDs are common and it is possible to be infected without being aware because many STDs do not display obvious signs or symptoms. STD testing once or twice every year is recommended. Regular STD testing is a great way to protect your sexual health as well as the health of your partner.

Why Should I get tested for STDs?

Everyone that is sexually active should be tested regularly. Take charge of your sexual health. Some STDs, like chlamydia and gonorrhea, may not display any symptoms at all, but are still just as contagious. Especially get tested if you experience any of these common STD symptoms: Genital sores, itching, unusual discharge from the penis or vagina, or a burning sensation during urination. Some people assume that they are tested for STDs when they have a Pap test or physical, but often this is not the case. There is no comprehensive test for all STDs because each test is specific to an infection. If you have STD symptoms, or have had unprotected sex, it is crucial that you and your partner get tested. By getting an STD test, you can officially put your mind at ease– After all, the most common STD symptoms is to have no symptoms at all.

How do I know if I have an STD?

You can have an STD and not know it due to a lack of symptoms. For instance, you can contract chlamydia or gonorrhea and not have the infection treated due to lack of bumps, rashes or itching. The “silent” nature of STDs helps explain why these infections are so widespread as so many individuals are simply unaware that they have one or more and they spread them unknowingly. Help put an end to the spread of STDs and help protect yourself by learning your status.

 Where can I get STD testing?

To find the testing center nearest you, visit our Local STD test center page and enter your zip code. We test for all major STDs, including HIV (Type 1 and Type 2), herpes 1, herpes 2, hepatitis A, hepatitis B, hepatitis C, chlamydia, gonorrhea and syphilis. Our doctors recommend the 10-Test Panel with HIV RNA Early Detection for the most complete coverage. Getting one STD test does not cover all STDs, and contracting one STD increases your chances of contracting others. The best way to be completely sure that you are STD-free is the all-inclusive 10-Test Panel package. Furthermore, our STD Test Recommender can help you discover which STD tests may be best for you.

Is oral sex safe sex?

Simply put, no. You are just as vulnerable to STDs from unprotected oral sex, whether you are the giver or the recipient, as you are with any other unprotected sexual activity. Oral sex may be comparatively less risky than vaginal or anal sex, but it is still advisable to use a latex or polyurethane condom, or dental dam in order to be safer. STDs can be transmitted through mouth sores and/or cuts, and some infections, such as herpes, can be spread via skin-to-skin contact. While condoms are not 100% effective in preventing all STDs, they greatly decrease the risk of transmitting an STD during oral sex.

How does your lab perform STD testing?

Our STD lab tests rely on either a small urine sample (for detecting chlamydia and/or gonorrhea) or a small blood sample (for detecting herpes, syphilis, hepatitis and/or HIV). This mean that you won’t be subjected to any uncomfortable physical exams and no vaginal/penile swabbing is required. You’ll be in and out of the testing center in 10 minutes!

Most sexually transmitted diseases do not show symptoms, making it possible to be infected with an STD and not know it. Did you know that if you have one STD, you may have multiple STDs? We are the only online STD testing service that offers an inclusive 10 Test STD Panel that tests for all the most common bacterial and viral STDs—including HIV type 1 & type 2 antibody/antigen (4th gen), herpes type 1 & type 2, hepatitis A, hepatitis B & hepatitis C, chlamydia, gonorrhea and syphilis. Comprehensive testing gives you peace of mind. Get our full 10 Test Panel package today and learn your STD status!

Our HIV RNA Early Detection test is the only FDA-approved test that detects the virus directly by screening for its RNA genetic material in your bloodstream, as such this HIV test is able to deliver conclusive results as soon as 9 to 11 days after potential HIV exposure.

GET TESTED TODAY.

Fast, Private & Affordable STD Testing

  • 100% Confidential STD Testing
  • 5 Minute Testing with Results in 1 to 2 days
  • All Tests are FDA-Approved
  • Same Day STD Testing Available
  • Over 4,500 testing centers Nationwide

Know Your Status. Get Tested.

Giving you control over your sexual health is one of the most important things we can do. That is why we’ve eliminated the embarrassment and hassle of conventional STD testing. We give you access to the same FDA- approved testing used by doctors and hospitals. Once you place your order, you can visit any of our nationwide testing centers without an appointment, even the same day of your purchase. Your results are delivered to you and no one else – nothing is reported to your insurance or placed on your medical records. More importantly, we provide guidance and support every step of the way, no matter what your results are.

Take charge of your sex life today. Help stop the spread of STDs by knowing your status.

Companion Planting In The Garden Makes “Good Neighbors”


Mr. Cucumber and Mrs.Tomatoes would make great Neighbors.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On the other side of the fence from Mrs.Tomatoes is Miss.Potatoe. They really don’t play well together. But add a Mrs.Basil in with Mr. Cucumber and Mrs.Tomatoes, and this combination will sure to give you a bumper crop.They work as a 3 plant combo very well.

You want to make sure that your veggies are happy in their neighborhoods

Here is a chart to help you find the right “Good Neighbors”

Listed from A To Z

 

Companion Planting Chart Courteous of:

Here are combinations found to be beneficial over time

from Todd Weinmann of North Dakota State University Agriculture Extension:
Plant Plant Companions Plant Allies Plant Enemies
Asparagus Basil, parsley, tomato Pot marigold deters beetles.
Beans Beet (to bush beans only), cabbage family, carrot, celery, chard, corn, cucumber, eggplant, pea, potatoes, radish, strawberry. Marigold deters Mexican bean beetles. Nasturtium and rosemary deter bean beetles. Summer savory deters bean beetles, improves growth and flavor. Garlic, onion and shallot stunt the growth of beans.
Beets Bush beans, cabbage family, lettuce, onion. Garlic improves growth and flavor. Pole beans and beets stunt each other’s growth.
Carrots Bean, lettuce, onion, pea, pepper, radish, tomato. Chives improve growth and flavor. Rosemary and sage deter carrot fly. Dill retards growth.
Celery Bean, cabbage family and tomato. Chives and garlic deter aphids. Nasturtium deters bugs and aphids.
Chard Bean, cabbage family and onion
Corn Bean, cucumber, melon, parsley, pea, potato, pumpkin, squash. Odorless marigold and white geranium deter Japanese beetles. Pigweed raises nutrients from the subsoil to where the corn can reach them. Tomatoes and corn are attacked by the same worm.
Cucumber Bean, cabbage family, corn, pea, radish, tomato Marigold deters beetles. Nasturtium deters aphids, beetles and bugs, improves growth and flavor. Oregano deters pests in general. Tansy deters ants, beetles, bugs, flying insects. Sage is generally injurious to cucumber.
Eggplant Bean, pepper. Marigold deters nematodes.
Lettuce Beet, cabbage family, carrot, onion, radish, strawberry. Chives and garlic deter aphids.
Melons Corn, pumpkin, radish, squash. Marigold deters beetles. Nasturtium deters bugs and beetles. Oregano provides general pest protection.
Onions Beet, cabbage family, carrot, chard, lettuce, pepper, strawberry, tomato. Chamomile and summer savory improve growth and flavor. Pigweed raises nutrients from subsoil and makes them available to the onions. Sow thistle improves growth and health. Onions stunt bean, pea.
Parsley Asparagus, corn, tomato
Peas Bean, carrot, corn, cucumber, radish, turnip. Chives deter aphids. Mint improves health and flavor. Garlic and onion stunt the growth of peas.
Peppers Carrot, eggplant, onion and tomato
Potatoes Beans, cabbage family, corn, eggplant, pea. Horseradish, planted at the corners of the potato patch, provides general protection. Marigold deters beetles. Tomatoes and potatoes are attacked by the same blight.
Pumpkins Corn, melon, squash. Marigold deters beetles. Nasturtium deters bugs, beetles. Oregano provides general pest protection.
Radishes Bean, carrot, cucumber, lettuce, melon, pea. Chervil and nasturtium improve growth and flavor. Hyssop
Spinach Cabbage family, strawberry
Squash Corn, melon, pumpkin. Borage deters worms, improves growth and flavor. Marigold deters beetles. Nasturtium deters squash bugs and beetles. Oregano provides general pest protection.
Strawberry Bean, lettuce, onion, spinach, thyme. Cabbage. Borage strengthens resistance to insects and disease. Thyme, as a border, deters worms.
Tomatoes Asparagus, carrot, celery, cucumber, onion, parsley, pepper. Basil repels flies and mosquitoes, improves growth and flavor. Bee balm, chives and mint improve health and flavor. Borage deters tomato worm, improves growth and flavor. Dill, until mature, improves growth and health. Once mature, it stunts tomato growth. Marigold deters nematodes. Pot marigold deters tomato worm and general garden pests. Corn and tomato are attacked by the same worm. Mature dill retards tomato growth. Kohlrabi stunts tomato growth. Potatoes and tomatoes are attacked by the same blight.
Turnips Pea
Cabbage Family (Broccoli, Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage, Cauliflower, Chinese Cabbage, Kale, and Kohlrabi) Beet, celery, chard, cucumber, lettuce, onion, potato, spinach. Chamomile and garlic improve growth and flavor. Catnip, hyssop, rosemary and sage deter cabbage moth. Dill improves growth and health. Mint deters cabbage moth and ants, improves health and flavor. Nasturtium deters bugs, beetles, aphids. Southernwood deters cabbage moth, improves growth and flavor. Tansy deters cabbageworm and cutworm. Thyme deters cabbageworm. Kohlrabi and tomato stunt each other’s growth.

 

 

Companion Planting In The Garden Makes “Good Neighbors”

 

 

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AMERICA, CODE BLUE… Young Pregnant Women Down!


USA Reports: Cardiac Arrest In Younger Pregnant Women Is On The Rise

BY: Chad Rhodes

NYU – School Of Medicine has conducted a study for the past 12 years on Heart Disease in pregnant women. Between 2002 and 2014 Cardiac Arrest has been the leading cause of death for 25% of young pregnant women. Heart Disease has been the number one cause of death for women for many years, but for younger women this is a drastic change compared to earlier years.

The disease in young women has been increasing and raising great concerns not only for the mother, but for the health of the unborn child also.  The risk factors for heart disease continue to increase in the United States. “High blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes are all higher in our younger women. Stress is another factor in High Risk pregnancy.

Rise in obesity in society plays a big part. Between more junk food available and the convenience of the “Drive Thru food”. Adding yeast to many packaged food and many drinks also.

Don’t get me started on Soda. This is a heart Killer, Diet KILLER.

You could ask if the younger women are getting enough “Quality” exercise, food and fluid intake. We all know with our busy lives exercise is the last thing we want to do after work all day. Making a wholesome meal for the family is about all the energy you can muster up. You end up asking yourself, where do I fit the time in?

The family entrees from the frozen section become your main staples. The concentrated amounts of sodium and preservatives is off the charts. Not only are you adding all this to your body that is creating it’s own voyage of problems to your heart risk factors.

Exercise does not have to mean Hitting the Gym 3 times a week. You can walk, band workout and create a new healthy diet. Include fresh home cooked meals that are lean, ending bad calorie intake.

IMG_4241

Healthy Ingredients

Get the kids to help you in the kitchen with dinner. Bringing your kids up with healthy choices makes their lifestyle an asset to their healthy future. Kids are great for washing the vegetables and mixing things up relieves you from 30 minutes of stress and time.

Most parents can not spend hours away from the kids, house or work. My solution is to incorporate the kids activities with yours.

Weekends are a good place to start. Take the kids for a walk every morning, that gets all of you on the road to increased blood flow through your body. As we all know the heart needs lots of exercise and if you sit for 8 hours a day, you need this more than those who stand up for work.

The U.K. Side

BJOG: UK Reports, Nearly one in four cardiac arrests in pregnancy are associated with complications of obstetric anesthesia.

Nearly one in four cardiac arrests in pregnancy are associated with complications of obstetric anesthesia, according to a new study published today (Friday 24 February) in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology (BJOG).

The aim of this study was to estimate the incidence of cardiac arrest in the UK obstetric population, describe how cardiac arrest in pregnancy is managed and report maternal and fetal outcomes. Using the UK Obstetric Surveillance System (UKOSS), researchers identified 66 women who had experienced a cardiac arrest in pregnancy among 2.3 million who gave birth between 2011 and 2014.

The three year study shows that maternal cardiac arrest in the UK is very rare (a 1 in 36,000 risk) and that maternal survival rates of 58% were possible due to timely resuscitation and rapid perimortem caesarean section (PMCS). In the 66 women involved in the study, cardiac output was restored in 48 and 49 women had a PMCS. The results also show that time from collapse to PMCS was significantly shorter in women who survived. 58 babies were delivered, 12 were stillborn.

Results found that the main association of collapse among antenatal women was obstetric anesthesia, given as an epidural, spinal or combined spinal-epidural. 16 (24%) of the women in the study had a cardiac arrest following obstetric anesthesia (all survived).

Meanwhile, 12 of the 16 women (75%) who had a cardiac arrest following obstetric anesthesia were obese (defined as having a Body Mass Index of 30kg/m2 or more). This supports the view that obese pregnant women are at a higher risk of complications of anesthesia, as the increased body fat makes procedures technically more difficult.

The study also shows that hypovolaemia (a decrease in blood volume), venous thromboembolism (a formation of blood clots in the vein) and amniotic fluid embolism (when amniotic fluid or other debris makes its way into the mother’s blood) are the main non-anaesthetic causes of cardiac arrest. As recommended in the most recent MBRRACE-UK report, there is a pressing need to improve systems focused on preventing and responding appropriately to these complications.”

In addition, of the 66 women who arrested in pregnancy, 27 had co-morbidities which may have contributed to maternal arrest. The most common problems reported were asthma, mental health problems, cardiac disease, hypertension, hematological, autoimmune and endocrine problems.

The researchers suggest a revision of multi-disciplinary training for healthcare professionals, and a revision of supervision and support on the labor ward.

Dr Virginia Beckett, lead author and consultant obstetrician and gynecologist at Bradford Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, said:

“Our study shows that management of cardiac arrest in pregnancy in the UK, following the introduction of training such as the Managing Obstetric Emergencies and Trauma (MOET) course, has resulted in a 58% maternal survival rate. The main reasons for this appear to be the involvement of senior medical professionals and swift PMCS.

“American data shows that up to one third of women who arrest die with their baby still in utero. In the UK, we take a very different approach; in this study, PMCS was carried out in 49 (74%) of the 66 women involved (only two women remained undelivered when they should have had a PMCS). This is close to a five-fold improvement. Rapid PMCS saves women’s lives.

“However, our study shows that the single, biggest association of maternal cardiac arrest is a complication of anesthesia. Further research is needed into this finding which presents an opportunity to reduce the incidence of maternal cardiac in the UK.

Mr Edward Morris, Vice President for Clinical Quality at the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (RCOG), said:

“This study demonstrates the importance of robust multi-disciplinary risk assessment processes in antenatal care, as well as team training to manage obstetric emergencies. It is also a great example of the value of collecting high quality data through UKOSS to improve outcomes for patients.

“Childbirth can be unpredictable and timely access to specialist care is critical; especially for those considered at higher risk due to per-existing health conditions. This data supports existing evidence that maternal cardiac arrest is becoming more common, and there may be opportunities to further improve survival rates through detailed analysis of this data.

“Obesity has reached pandemic proportions globally, with around one in five pregnant women in the UK considered obese. This increases their risk of miscarriage, stillbirth and neonatal death as well gestational diabetes, blood clots, per-eclampsia, more complicated labors, and severe bleeding after the birth. Although they survived, a high proportion of the women who had cardiac arrests following obstetric anesthesia were obese.

“Maintaining a normal body weight can reduce the risk of complications for both mother and baby. Women should keep active and eat well prior to conception and limit weight gain during pregnancy in order to improve their own health and provide their baby with the best start in life.”

Mr Michael Masch, Deputy Editor-in-chief of BJOG, added:

“Although about 60 percent of women survived, and most received timely resuscitation and perimortem caesarean section, this study highlights the necessity for regular multi-disciplinary training in specific arrest management. Further research into the links between anesthesia and cardiac arrest is also warranted.”

Ends

For media inquiries or copies of the study please contact the RCOG press office on 020 7772 6357 or email .

Notes to editors:

VA Beckett, M Knight, and P Sharpe. The CAPS Study: Incidence, management and outcomes of cardiac arrest in pregnancy in the UK: a prospective, descriptive study. BJOG 2017: DOI: 10.1111/1471-0528.14521

The article can be found here: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1471-0528.14521/full

This study was funded by a grant from Wellbeing of Women.

BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology is owned by the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (RCOG) but is editorially independent and published monthly by Wiley. The journal features original, peer-reviewed, high-quality medical research in all areas of obstetrics and gynecology worldwide. Please quote ‘BJOG’ or ‘BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology’ when referring to the journal. To keep up to date with our latest papers, follow @BJOGTweets.

The Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists is a medical charity that champions the provision of high quality women’s healthcare in the UK and beyond. It is dedicated to encouraging the study and advancing the science and practice of obstetrics and gynecology. It does this through postgraduate medical education and training and the publication of clinical guidelines and reports on aspects of the specialty and service provision.