Clean Water??? PUNA


WHO”S MINDING THE WATER QUALITY

DURING THIS CRISIS???

By Chad Rhodes 6/3/2018 3:30 pm

I am no longer getting my drinking water from Pahoa side. Now going Keaau side. If the methane gas is present who’s to say it has not already penetrated the water table in Pahoa. Where is that water table in Pahoa. Feast your pretty eyes on this. This is why I have brought up these issues. I have not heard any one mention the water source for the Puna District.

Kilauea Aquifer Sector Area Hawaii County

KILAUEA AQUIFER SECTOR AREA

SECTOR AREA PROFILE

General

The Kilauea Aquifer Sector Area (ASEA) includes the Pahoa [80801], Kalapana [80802], Hilina[80803], and Keaiwa [80804] Aquifer System Areas (ASYA).  It captures most of the Puna District and the southeastern portion of the Kau District, and extends along most of the island’s southeastern coastline as far south as Kuhua Bay outside Punaluu. The sector area includes most of the Kilauea Crater and Hawaii Volcanoes National Park.

Economy and Population

Economy

Agriculture is the primary economic function in the Puna District.  Vegetables / Papayas in the Kapoho area, flowers in the Pahoa and Kapoho areas, and bananas are the principal products.  Truck farming in the Volcano area is also significant.  The majority of the State’s papayas and bananas are grown in Puna. Several Marijuana growers due to the sunny, hot, humid days.

The Puna Geothermal Venture (PGV) plant located outside of Kapoho generates 30-MW of electricity using three geothermal wells.  Plans were already under way to expand the facility to double its output, but Pele put a stop to that we hope..  PGV had employed 30 people.

Population

Nearly all of the population contributing to the demands from the Kilauea ASEA is within the Puna District.  The rate of growth of Puna’s population has slowed in the past few years., but still ranks as the island’s highest.  The growth can be attributed to the affordability of residences outside of Hilo and the job opportunities in Hilo.  Puna’s status as a “bedroom community” for Hilo is evident from much slower growth in employment, and the worsening traffic on its roads leading into Hilo.

Ok, you have a little better understanding why I have concern. Lager Population, PGV Leaking into Aquifer, Fertilizers used by farmers, cars and other contaminants. Now look at the map and tell me that the Aquifer could not be at risk.

Click on Picture to enlarge image and read complete

So you ask Who’s in Charge

Hawaii County Water Supply

Address: 345 Kekuanaoa St #20, Hilo, HI 96720

Phone: (808) 961-8050

Call and ask when the last test on the Water Spigot locations in the KILAUEA AQUIFER SECTOR AREA was.

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THE HEALTH HAZARDS OF VOLCANIC ASH (part 4 Indirect health effects )


THE HEALTH HAZARDS OF VOLCANIC ASH

A guide for the public

This   document   has   been   prepared   by   the International  Volcanic  Health  Hazard  Network (IVHHN), Cities and Volcanoes Commission, GNS Science and the United States Geological Survey (USGS)  to  promote  the  safety  of  those  who experience volcanic ashfall. This guide explains the potential health effects of volcanic ash and gives details on how to protect yourself and your family in the event of a volcanic ash fall.

Indirect Effects of Ash Fall

As well as the short and long term health risks, indirect impacts of large ash falls must also be considered. These mainly arise from the secondary consequences of ash fall.

Effects on roads

The reduction in visibility from airborne ash alone may cause accidents. This danger is compounded by ash
covering roads. Not only are road markings covered up, but thin layers of either wet or dry ash are very
slippery, reducing traction. Thick deposits of ash may make roads impassable, cutting off communities from
basic supplies.

Effects on Power

Ash fall can lead to power cuts. These may have implications for health due to lack of heating
or other infrastructural requirements that depend on electricity. Wet ash is conductive, so it is essential
that safe operating procedures are stringently followed when cleaning power supply equipment.

Effects on water supplies

Ash fall can cause contamination of water or clogging and damage of water supply equipment. Small, open
water supplies such as domestic water tanks with roof drainage are especially vulnerable to volcanic ash fall,
and even small quantities of ash may cause problems for potability. While the risk of toxicity is low, the pH
may be reduced or chlorination inhibited. During and after ash falls, there is also likely to be extra water
demand for clean-up, resulting in water shortages.

Effects on sanitation

(waste water disposal etc).
The temporary disablement of municipal sanitation systems may lead to increased disease in affected areas.

Risk Of Roof Collapse

1) Roofs can collapse from the weight of ash, resulting in injury or death for those underneath.
2) There is a danger of roof collapse whilst clearing ash from roofs due to the increased load of a person on an already overloaded roof.
3) In several eruptions people have died after falling from their roofs while cleaning up ash.

Animal Health

If the ash is coated in hydrofluoric acid, the ash can be very toxic to grazing animals if they ingest ash-covered grass and soil.

Hawaii Volcano, Acid Rain and Your Drinking Water


MORE About Hawai`i’s Acid Rain for Catchment Tanks

BY: Trisha Macomber, MPH, UH College of Tropical Agriculture & Human Resources, Cooperative Extension Services

Because many questions have come up lately about the pH (a measure of acidity or alkalinity) in our catchment systems, we want to give you more detail on how acid rain can affect you through catchment water.

Different locations may require different treatment

The pH scale measures how acidic or basic something is. This logarithmic scale goes from 0-14. Numbers below 7 are considered acidic and above 7 are basic. Seven is neutral. Rain usually has a pH in the mid to high 5’s. Less than 5.6 is considered “acid rain.” On the mainland, acid rain is usually associated with pollution from burning fossil fuels that release excessive nitrogen oxides into the atmosphere. In Hawai`i, the biggest cause of acid rain is from our volcanoes, which release sulfur dioxides and trioxides into the air. These oxides, in a series of reactions in the atmosphere, combine with water molecules and form dilute acids which return to earth as acid rain. Usually Hawai`i’s acid rain contains sulfuric acid where other types of air pollution can create nitric acid.

Why does acid rain matter?

Normally rocks, soil and vegetation act as buffers and neutralize the acid. If the pH is really low, it can damage delicate vegetation and cause ecological damage. In rainwater catchment systems, acid rain can be a problem because it can leach metals and other surface and tank coatings and deposit them into the water. This is a particular problem in older homes—typically built before 1979—where roofs might have lead paint, nails, flashings and solder.

Is acid rain a health hazard?

Drinking acidic rainwater isn’t normally a problem. In fact, we drink a lot of acidic drinks and food. However, excessive acid could affect your teeth. Just like drinking soda pop or sucking on lemons, if you constantly expose your teeth to acid conditions, their protective enamel coating will be compromised.

Our biggest concern about drinking acidic rainwater is when heavy metals and other leached materials get into the water. A very common problem is when copper from water pipes make blue/green stains on our sinks and tubs. Sometimes severe leaching will cause pipes to leak.

Having some copper in our water is not necessarily a health hazard because our bodies need some copper. Many people’s diets in the US are deficient in copper and vitamin C inhibits the body’s intake of copper. However, if you suspect your copper levels are high, especially if you can taste the copper in your water, it may be too high and you should get your water tested.

Where to get your water tested for copper and lead

The cost of copper and lead water testing is partially subsidized by the Department of Health’s Safe Drinking Water Branch. On the island of Hawaii, call 933-0401 to make arrangements. You can also do inexpensive testing for lead and copper through the UH College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources, however these laboratories are not certified for drinking water, so if you use them, you should only use the results as a reference (for example, your levels are high or low), rather than focusing on a specific number.

Charcoal or carbon filters can also remove heavy metals

You can add filters made from charcoal or carbon blocks to remove lead, copper and other similar contaminants from the water. These filters should have a list of what contaminants they remove on the outside packaging. We also recommend that the product you buy contain an NSF International seal, which verifies the manufacturer’s claims.

How to get pH testing

If you want to test the pH of your water, you can buy simple pH test strips from chemical supply stores or from the UH CTAHR Hilo office. PH testing kits are also available from swimming pool supply stores and some hardware stores. In addition, there are local water laboratories that can do pH testing, if you prefer to bring a water sample to a lab, call the lab first to learn how to collect your water appropriately.

How to raise the pH levels in your catchment tank

If you need to raise the pH in your water, dissolve about 1-2 boxes of sodium bicarbonate (baking soda) in a bucket of water and add it to the tank every 2-4 weeks. You may need more, depending on the acidity of your water and size of your tank. Too much baking soda will make your water start to feel very soft or slimy. The baking soda also adds salt into your water, just like commercial water softeners do, and may be a problem for people on restricted salt diets.

Another product you can add is food-grade calcium carbonate granules, which are available from chemical supply companies and some local suppliers. Large solids of calcium carbonate, like limestone rocks, are not effective because the sulfur coats the surfaces and does not wash off. With limestone granules, the surface area is much larger, so they will work longer.

Concrete hollow building blocks or tiles are not effective as their surface gets coated quickly and they are not food-grade, so they should not be added to catchment water.

For more information, please contact Trisha Macomber, MPH, UH College of Tropical Agriculture & Human Resources, Cooperative Extension Services, 981-5199 or send and e-mail to: macomber@hawaii.edu.

https://www.ctahr.hawaii.edu/hawaiirain/more-vog.html