Tag Archives: animals

ASPCA… Don’t Adopt That Dog???


Find Out Now what you need to know before you adopt…

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The Struggle For These Animals Are “REAL”


LINKS FOR FUND RAISERS

EMERGENCY DONATIONS NEEDED FOR HAWAII

The Struggle For These Animals Are “REAL”

As you all know by now, on the Big Island of Hawaii on May 3, 2018 we had an volcano eruption. Leilani Estates was the first Subdivision to be affected. Many animals at that time were left behind. Some had no choice but to leave their pets.

This community has come together with many volunteers. They have activated their own search and rescue efforts. The Rescue Agency pay for all the gas, food and any other expenses. Now with donations starting to come in has made a big improvement for the rescue animals. People have taken animals into their homes for temporary housing. Everyone is pitching in where they can. The Rescue Agency’s are full. Some have erected temporary structures to house the animals.

June 5, 2018 UPDATE: There have been 4 of new areas added for the animals to be rescued.

All Of Hawaii’s Animal Rescue Agency’s are still rescuing the Animals Left Behind in this Crisis.

A Special Shout Out To All Of the Hawaii and Mainland Rescue Agency’s For Pitching In and Helping.

The Animals Thank You

Every Agency Could Use A $1 DONATION

 


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Hawaii Lava Flow Animal Rescue

The Hawaiʻi Lava Flow Animal Rescue Network (HLFARN) was created to serve as an informational hub for those needing assistance with pets and animals on farms during the 2018 eruption of Kilauea on the Big Island of Hawaiʻi. But it has become so much more than that. HLFARN has blossomed from a group of strangers into an Ohana; a family of people whose love for animals has taken them into the path of an erupting volcano to rescue pets and farm animals that have been left behind.

https://www.gofundme.com/hlfarn



BIG ISLAND LOST AND FOUND PETS ONLY

We are sending out a “HOLLA” for you to share Please.

We have several Lost and Found pets that need their owners. They were scared and hungry, but now are safe. All organizations are looking for people to Sharing posts with friends and family is #1, volunteering time to help with the pets and offer space in their homes for these pets. Short Stay and Long Stay, permanent and temporary.

Please Contact : https://www.facebook.com/groups/BigIslandLostAndFoundPetsOnly/about/


WORLD WIDE LINKS FOR DONATIONS

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THE HEALTH HAZARDS OF VOLCANIC ASH (part 4 Indirect health effects )


THE HEALTH HAZARDS OF VOLCANIC ASH

A guide for the public

This   document   has   been   prepared   by   the International  Volcanic  Health  Hazard  Network (IVHHN), Cities and Volcanoes Commission, GNS Science and the United States Geological Survey (USGS)  to  promote  the  safety  of  those  who experience volcanic ashfall. This guide explains the potential health effects of volcanic ash and gives details on how to protect yourself and your family in the event of a volcanic ash fall.

Indirect Effects of Ash Fall

As well as the short and long term health risks, indirect impacts of large ash falls must also be considered. These mainly arise from the secondary consequences of ash fall.

Effects on roads

The reduction in visibility from airborne ash alone may cause accidents. This danger is compounded by ash
covering roads. Not only are road markings covered up, but thin layers of either wet or dry ash are very
slippery, reducing traction. Thick deposits of ash may make roads impassable, cutting off communities from
basic supplies.

Effects on Power

Ash fall can lead to power cuts. These may have implications for health due to lack of heating
or other infrastructural requirements that depend on electricity. Wet ash is conductive, so it is essential
that safe operating procedures are stringently followed when cleaning power supply equipment.

Effects on water supplies

Ash fall can cause contamination of water or clogging and damage of water supply equipment. Small, open
water supplies such as domestic water tanks with roof drainage are especially vulnerable to volcanic ash fall,
and even small quantities of ash may cause problems for potability. While the risk of toxicity is low, the pH
may be reduced or chlorination inhibited. During and after ash falls, there is also likely to be extra water
demand for clean-up, resulting in water shortages.

Effects on sanitation

(waste water disposal etc).
The temporary disablement of municipal sanitation systems may lead to increased disease in affected areas.

Risk Of Roof Collapse

1) Roofs can collapse from the weight of ash, resulting in injury or death for those underneath.
2) There is a danger of roof collapse whilst clearing ash from roofs due to the increased load of a person on an already overloaded roof.
3) In several eruptions people have died after falling from their roofs while cleaning up ash.

Animal Health

If the ash is coated in hydrofluoric acid, the ash can be very toxic to grazing animals if they ingest ash-covered grass and soil.

THE HEALTH HAZARDS OF VOLCANIC ASH (part 5 What to do to protect yourself against ash)


THE HEALTH HAZARDS OF VOLCANIC ASH

A guide for the public

This   document   has   been   prepared   by   the International  Volcanic  Health  Hazard  Network (IVHHN), Cities and Volcanoes Commission, GNS Science and the United States Geological Survey (USGS)  to  promote  the  safety  of  those  who experience volcanic ashfall. This guide explains the potential health effects of volcanic ash and gives details on how to protect yourself and your family in the event of a volcanic ash fall.

What to do to Protect Yourself Against Ash

Limit Driving

Immediately after an ash fall, even a light one, driving conditions, visibility and air quality can be dramatically
affected, especially by the resuspension of ash by traffic.
Rainfall has a sudden but temporary effect in improving air quality until the ash dries out again. We recommend that, following an ash fall, you refrain from driving and stay indoors if possible. If you must drive, maintain a large distance from the vehicle in front of
you and drive slowly.

Reduce ash in your house

Keep all doors and windows closed whenever possible.

Eye protection

In fine-ash environments, wear goggles or corrective eyeglasses instead of contact lenses to protect eyes from irritation.

Protection

Those undertaking clean-up operations should always wear effective dust masks (see IVHHN Recommended
Masks document at http://www.ivhhn.org). If no approved mask is available, a fabric mask improvised from cloth
will filter out the larger ash particles which may contribute to throat and eye irritation. Dampening
the fabric with water will improve its effectiveness. People with chronic bronchitis, emphysema or asthma
are advised to stay inside and avoid unnecessary exposure to ash.

Drinking Water

After light ash fall it is usually safe to drink water contaminated with ash, but it is better to filter off the
ash particles before drinking. However, ash increases the chlorine requirement in disinfected surface-collected
water which, therefore, can be microbiologically unsafe to drink. Ash will usually make drinking water
unpalatable (sour, metallic or bitter-tasting) before it presents a health risk. The safest way to ensure your well-being is to stock up on water prior to the event. Collect enough drinking water for at least a week (up to one gallon , or 3-4 litres, per person per day). If you rely on collecting rainwater, cover the tank and disconnect any down pipes before ash fall occurs.

Home-grown food

Ash-covered vegetables grown in fields are safe to eat after washing with clean water

Clean Up

Lightly water down the ash deposits before they are removed by shoveling, being careful not to excessively
wet the deposits on roofs, causing excess loading and danger of collapse. Dry brushing can produce very high
exposure levels and should be avoided. Hosing uses large quantities of water and may cause water
shortages in heavily-populated areas.

BIG ISLAND LOST AND FOUND PETS ONLY


BIG ISLAND LOST AND FOUND PETS ONLY

We are sending out a “HOLLA” for you to share Please.

We have several Lost and Found pets that need their owners. They were scared and hungry, but now are safe. All organizations are looking for people to Sharing posts with friends and family is #1, volunteering time to help with the pets and offer space in their homes for these pets. Short Stay and Long Stay, permanent and temporary.

Please Contact : https://www.facebook.com/groups/BigIslandLostAndFoundPetsOnly/about/

HELP PUNA STAY STRONG… Animals Need Help…


LINKS FOR FUND RAISERS

EMERGENCY DONATIONS NEEDED FOR HAWAII


JOIN US ON FACEBOOK


JOIN US ON FACEBOOK


Hawaii Lava Flow Animal Rescue

The Hawaiʻi Lava Flow Animal Rescue Network (HLFARN) was created to serve as an informational hub for those needing assistance with pets and animals on farms during the 2018 eruption of Kilauea on the Big Island of Hawaiʻi. But it has become so much more than that. HLFARN has blossomed from a group of strangers into an Ohana; a family of people whose love for animals has taken them into the path of an erupting volcano to rescue pets and farm animals that have been left behind.

https://www.gofundme.com/hlfarn



BIG ISLAND NEEDS HELP WITH THE ANIMALS… PLEASE HELP…


LINKS FOR FUND RAISERS

EMERGENCY DONATIONS NEEDED FOR HAWAII

The Community and the Shelters are overwhelmed and need your help today.

 

Hawaii Lava Flow Animal Rescue

The Hawaiʻi Lava Flow Animal Rescue Network (HLFARN) was created to serve as an informational hub for those needing assistance with pets and animals on farms during the 2018 eruption of Kilauea on the Big Island of Hawaiʻi. But it has become so much more than that. HLFARN has blossomed from a group of strangers into an Ohana; a family of people whose love for animals has taken them into the path of an erupting volcano to rescue pets and farm animals that have been left behind.

We are a grassroots movement to help the residents displaced from Leilani Estates and lower Puna to evacuate their beloved companions and friends. As a group of volunteers, we have rescued over 200 animals thus far. We continue to help residents, their furry friends, and stray animals every day; rain or shine.

The continuing eruption has destroyed homes and threatened lives, including the lives of dogs, cats, rabbits, pigs, birds, fish, chickens, goats, sheep, cows, and horses. A plethora of animals have been abandoned or relocated to foster care while their owners figure out where they are going to live. Foster families have taken on the burden of caring for these animals without a second thought as to who will feed and care for them.

We are asking for donations to help our field volunteers acquire safety gear, respirators, and to help alleviate the cost of transportation. Your donation will help to rescue, provide food, carriers, crates, and medical attention to many pets and farm animals. We would also like to help those who are relocating with crates for airline travel. Your donation will support the long and tedious process of caring for rescued animals, as well as some support to evacuated families who are dealing with one of the most difficult times of their lives. Without your help, and the help of our volunteers, these animals would have likely perished. Your donation will save lives and help keep families together.

Mahalo for taking the time to read and share our mission in saving as many animals as we can.

Please check out the GOFUNDME page. https://www.gofundme.com/hlfarn

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JOIN US ON FACEBOOK

 


JOIN US ON FACEBOOK


Hawaii Lava Flow Animal Rescue

The Hawaiʻi Lava Flow Animal Rescue Network (HLFARN) was created to serve as an informational hub for those needing assistance with pets and animals on farms during the 2018 eruption of Kilauea on the Big Island of Hawaiʻi. But it has become so much more than that. HLFARN has blossomed from a group of strangers into an Ohana; a family of people whose love for animals has taken them into the path of an erupting volcano to rescue pets and farm animals that have been left behind.

https://www.gofundme.com/hlfarn


DIATOMACEOUS EARTH AND YOUR PETS


dog-cats

DIATOMACEOUS EARTH AND YOUR PETS

 

PETS: Our best friends come in all shapes and sizes. Protect them from fleas and other crawling insects with diatomaceous earth. Thoroughly treat floor and bedding in and around pets’ sleeping quarters. Treat surrounding cracks and crevices, baseboards, carpeting and wherever fleas and other crawling insects are suspected.

flea-eggs-dogCRAWLING INSECT CONTROL diatomaceous earth kills by physical action, not chemical. The tiny diatoms scratch off the insect’s waxy coating, and they dehydrate and die.

“Our work is based on natural, preventive care for animals, so of course we are always on the lookout for good, quality NATURAL products to help our clients and our listening audience that won’t break the bank.” We have long been proponents of diatomaceous earth as a natural pest control for all animals.

de-microscopeRegular Food Grade Diatomaceous Earth for Pet and Animal Consumption:
The Following is Recommended Food daily doses for Dogs and Cats. The diatomaceous earth seems to create an environment in the digestive system that parasites cannot live in. Also reported are great results with sore and painful hips and joints, and even a fuller, healthier shiny coat when fed as a regular daily supplement.

Other suggestions for food grade diatomaceous earth for pets:
Cat Litter/Kitty Litter: Liberally add Diatomaceous Earth to litter box to effectively control dampness and odors.

Animal Suggested Rate
Large Cats 1 teaspoon
Kittens 1/4 teaspoon
Dogs 100 lbs + 1-2 tablespoons
Dogs 50-100 lbs 1 tablespoon
Mini dogs 1/2 teaspoon

In clinical observations of feeding dogs over 35 lbs. 1 tablespoon/day, and dogs under 35 lbs. 1 teaspoon/day, of diatomaceous earth, within seven days all ova disappeared from stools. Diatomaceous Earth controlled Ascarids (Toxocana), Hookworms (Anclyostoma caninum), and Whipworms (Trichuris vulipis).
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