Tag Archives: safety

McGruff TURNS 40… GET YOUR KIDS SAFE KIT TODAY


McGruff Turns 40!

July 1st, 2020 marks McGruff’s 40th Birthday! Information on scheduled events, participation opportunities, and sponsorship levels coming soon.

In 1992, the McGruff Safe Kits were officially licensed by the National Crime Prevention Council, and aimed to teach children about safety in a fun and friendly way.

Today, the goal is the same. Along with providing safety advice to children.

The McGruff Safe Kids ID Kit also gives parents a convenient way to store their child’s important information.

PRESS HERE TO ORDER YOUR SAFE KIDS KIT TODAY

KEEPING SAFE THIS WINTER


Remain vigilant about safety in and around the home this winter. Here are three winter hazards to keep in mind.

First, Carbon Monoxide – The Invisible Killer

  • Use portable generators outside your home and place them at least 20 feet away from the residence with exhaust pointed away from spaces where it can gather and present a hazard. Never use a generator inside a home, basement, shed or garage. The exhaust from portable generators contains poisonous carbon monoxide (CO), which can kill in minutes. 
  • Most portable generator-related deaths from CO poisoning occur during the cold months. 
  • Never leave a car running in a garage, even with the garage door open.
  • Install CO alarms in your home on every level and outside all sleeping areas. Test CO alarms monthly. 
  • See our new video here

VACATION HAWAII $40 a night

Second, Space Heaters – Give Them Space

  • Your space heater needs space. Keep flammable objects, such as curtains, sofas, beds, clothes and papers at least 3 feet away from your space heater at all times.
  • Make sure your space heater is placed on a stable, level, flat surface in an area where it can’t be knocked over.
  • Turn off space heaters when you are sleeping, or when you leave the room. 
  • Install smoke alarms on every floor of your home, outside all sleeping areas, and inside each bedroom. Test smoke alarms once a month to make sure they are working.

Third, Snow Blower Hazards – Clear Snow Safely 

  • Most snow blower injuries happen when consumers try to clear snow from the discharge chute with their hands.
  • NEVER leave a gas-powered snow blower running in an enclosed area. The exhaust contains poisonous carbon monoxide, which can kill in minutes.
  • Don’t add gasoline to a running or hot engine, to avoid a fire; and always keep the gasoline in a portable gasoline container with a child-resistant closure to prevent child poisonings.

One more very important thing… Clear the snow away from your gas meter and away from any pipes around that area.

Protecting your Skin … Cleansing your pores…Fire… Smoke and Ash Fallout. What to Do.


BY: ORGNAT LIFE

MOST IMPORTANTLY: KEEP YOUR FACE, HANDS and EYES COVERED.

Always wash your hands and change clothes as soon as you get home.

Try and keep the contamination to one area.

If you are one of the few that come home to one of the burnt out neighborhoods make sure you exercise caution while out in the elements.

That means anytime you are outside make sure you follow these simple emergency instructions to cleansing your body.

  • You do not want to inhale any of the elements that is on fire or has been burnt out.
  • Respiratory infections and many other illness can be blamed on large burn out fires as these.
  • Think about how many toxic products that are in our homes. Make sure if moving one of these items you are prepared with emergency protection gear.
  • Refrigerator, microwaves, cars, carpet, wood flooring that has been treated and those are just a few things that every home may have.

Your home and residing in the neighborhood: Set up an area that you can seal off. If you have a separate hall way that you can close off with plastic or a separate entry, perhaps through the side garage door(not a big one)with door to house. Handy to change contaminated clothes.

Even though your area may not have flames crawling up your street or that you can actually see, remember embers and ash can float through the air. It will glide until it gets caught on a branch or something to cling onto.

Make sure you bath each night before you go to bed.

Open your pores with warm water and use a good scrubby or washcloth with loads of soap. Soap up really good. Use cold water after to wash the soap off and close your pores.

Keep all of your smoke clothes in a plastic bag in your sealed area until you wash them. You don’t want to spread the smell or contaminate any other area.

If you are in close vicinity of the devastated areas: Do Not run any fans or air conditioning that has a connetion to outdoors. Close all doors, windows and vents. Close blinds and curtains to keep sun out and temperatures down in the house.

The Struggle For These Animals Are “REAL”


LINKS FOR FUND RAISERS

EMERGENCY DONATIONS NEEDED FOR HAWAII

The Struggle For These Animals Are “REAL”

As you all know by now, on the Big Island of Hawaii on May 3, 2018 we had an volcano eruption. Leilani Estates was the first Subdivision to be affected. Many animals at that time were left behind. Some had no choice but to leave their pets.

This community has come together with many volunteers. They have activated their own search and rescue efforts. The Rescue Agency pay for all the gas, food and any other expenses. Now with donations starting to come in has made a big improvement for the rescue animals. People have taken animals into their homes for temporary housing. Everyone is pitching in where they can. The Rescue Agency’s are full. Some have erected temporary structures to house the animals.

June 5, 2018 UPDATE: There have been 4 of new areas added for the animals to be rescued.

All Of Hawaii’s Animal Rescue Agency’s are still rescuing the Animals Left Behind in this Crisis.

A Special Shout Out To All Of the Hawaii and Mainland Rescue Agency’s For Pitching In and Helping.

The Animals Thank You

Every Agency Could Use A $1 DONATION

 


JOIN US ON FACEBOOK


JOIN US ON FACEBOOK


Hawaii Lava Flow Animal Rescue

The Hawaiʻi Lava Flow Animal Rescue Network (HLFARN) was created to serve as an informational hub for those needing assistance with pets and animals on farms during the 2018 eruption of Kilauea on the Big Island of Hawaiʻi. But it has become so much more than that. HLFARN has blossomed from a group of strangers into an Ohana; a family of people whose love for animals has taken them into the path of an erupting volcano to rescue pets and farm animals that have been left behind.

https://www.gofundme.com/hlfarn



BIG ISLAND LOST AND FOUND PETS ONLY

We are sending out a “HOLLA” for you to share Please.

We have several Lost and Found pets that need their owners. They were scared and hungry, but now are safe. All organizations are looking for people to Sharing posts with friends and family is #1, volunteering time to help with the pets and offer space in their homes for these pets. Short Stay and Long Stay, permanent and temporary.

Please Contact : https://www.facebook.com/groups/BigIslandLostAndFoundPetsOnly/about/


WORLD WIDE LINKS FOR DONATIONS

CHECK US OUT ON FACEBOOK

VOG: OUR HEALTH… WHAT IS THIS HAWAII?


WHAT IS VOG???

WARNING: STAY INSIDE YOUR HOMES IF POSSIBLE.

by Chad Rhodes May 8, 2018 10:34 AM


The big question the last few days has been “Whats the VOG going to do to us humans and our pets?”

Noxious sulfur dioxide gas and other pollutants emitted from Kilauea Volcano on the Island of Hawai`i react with oxygen and atmospheric moisture to produce volcanic smog (vog) and acid rain. Vog poses a health hazard by aggravating preexisting respiratory ailments, and acid rain damages crops and can leach lead into household water supplies. The U.S. Geological Survey’s Hawaiian Volcano Observatory is closely monitoring gas emissions from Kilauea and working with health professionals and local officials to better understand volcanic air pollution and to enhance public awareness of this hazard.

Leilani Estates and Lanipuna Gardens are both consumed by noxious gases and are not safe for humans or pets to live in.

Thick, acrid haze has started to cover all of the East side of the island. A resident from Hawaiian Paradise Park, approximately 15 miles from the eruption in Leilani Estates said “for the last 2 days we have had vog and ash. As you can see my fan is covered in what I am assuming is ash from Leilani Estates or Kilauea”.

We were warned early and told that outdoor activities in parks/ beaches might be canceled in affected areas and that schools might need to keep children indoors. People were also warned to be aware of respiratory problems, as these conditions could deteriorate more rapidly in areas of heavier haze. Keep your pets indoors if possible. This choking haze was not caused by a forest fire or industrial pollution but by light winds blowing gas emissions from Leilani Estates and/or Kilauea Volcano into the area.

SO2 is a poisonous gas that irritates skin and the tissues and mucous membranes of the eyes, nose, and throat. During even moderate physical activity, SO2 penetrates deeply into the airway and can produce respiratory distress in some individuals.

Many residents and visitors on the Island of Hawai`i report physical complaints associated with vog exposure. These complaints include headaches, breathing difficulties, increased susceptibility to respiratory ailments, watery eyes, sore throat, flu-like symptoms, and a general lack of energy. In contrast to SO2 gas concentration near Kilauea, the amount of aerosol particles in Hawaii’s air does not routinely exceed Federal standards, but the unique combination of acidic particles, trace amounts of toxic metals, and SO2 gas in vog may account for the wide variety of physical symptoms reported.

For More Information on Vog please see USGS