Category Archives: WARNINGS, RECALLS & ETC

PLEASE… DONT DRINK and DRIVE…


Buzzed Driving is Drunk Driving

Whoooo wee I don’t know what the explosion was


5 minutes ago loud explosion and shook the house. It made my decision to get up and get dressed.

Mauna Loa Eruption 11-2022

Can’t see any thing but grey ashy looking sky. Don’t want to stay out for too long. Still trying to find out what the boom was.

ERUPTION UPDATE 11-30-2022


This is a Civil Defense message.

This is an Eruption update for Wednesday, November 30th at 8 in the morning.

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reports the leading edge of the lava flow on Mauna Loa’s northeast flank is above 7,000 foot elevation and more than 3 miles from Daniel K. Inouye Highway.

Daniel K. Inouye Highway is open in both directions.

Vehicle parking along Daniel K. Inouye Highway is unsafe and prohibited.

Hawaii Police Department reports that motorists that park along Daniel K. Inouye Highway between the 16 and 31 Mile Markers will be subject to traffic citation and vehicles will be towed.

You will be updated of any changes that affect your safety. 

This is your Hawaii County Civil Defense Agency.Confirm Receipt© 2022 Everbridge, Inc.

ERUPTION UPDATE


This is a Civil Defense message.

This is an Eruption update for Tuesday, November 29th at 10 in the morning.

USGS – Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reports the leading edge of the lava flow on Mauna Loa’s northeast flank remains at a high elevation of over 9,000 feet and more than 5 miles from Saddle Road.  

As stated, the northeast flank of Mauna Loa is not populated and lava continues to not pose a threat to any communities or infrastructure, at this time.

Due to no threat to communities at this time, shelters that were opened yesterday at Old Kona Airport in Kailua-Kona and Ka`u Gymnasium in Pahala as a precaution, will be closed at noon today.

For those traveling Saddle Road /Daniel K. Inouye Highway, parking along the highway is unsafe and prohibited.  Hawaii Police Department report that vehicles that park along Saddle Road /Daniel K. Inouye Highway between the 16 and 31 Mile Markers will be subject to citation and will be towed. 

You will be informed of any changes that affect your safety. 

This is your Hawaii County Civil Defense Agency.Confirm Receipt© 2022 Everbridge, Inc.

lava Eruption: Filter for doorways and windows.


Measure you doorways and windows that you want to leave open to get fresh air.

Go to your hardware store and pick up HVAC Filters. They have various sizes. I used 20 x 25 on the doors and 16x 20 for the windows. You need 2 pieces of wood 1“x 2” x 8 feet per door. Windows I just used the duct tape

Tools you’ll need. Duct tape, scissors, utility knife, tape measure, filters.

Doorway: Cut your wood to the correct size. Lay the wood down and stick the filters in between the 2 pieces of wood. Measure both sides so it is even or your pañal will be crooked. Tape each side length wise first and flip it over and tape. Then tape each individual panel and go around the wood.

You won’t need wood for the windows. Just tape the panels together after measuring.

WARNING: VOLCANO ERUPTION CDC USGS HVO


This is a Civil Defense Message.

This is an Eruption message for Monday, November 28th at 12:30 AM.

USGS – Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reports an eruption at the summit of Mauna Loa is occurring.

USGS – Hawaiian Volcano Observatory and Civil Defense are activated and monitoring the situation.

The eruption is confined to the summit of Mauna Loa and there are no lava flow threats to communities and there is no evacuation requested at this time.

You will be informed of any changes that affect your safety. 

This is your Hawaii County Civil Defense Agency.Confirm Receipt© 2022 Everbridge, Inc.

Influenza Historic Timeline


JUST REMEMBER… This is not the first virus pandemic and it’s not the last…

STRESS will kill you before the virus. So take a deep breath, relax and stay at home where you are safe.

Below is a historical timeline of major scientific and public health events and milestones in influenza prevention recorded by the CDC.

1930s
1940s
  • 1940s: Thomas Francis, Jr., MD and Jonas Salk, MD serve as lead researchers at the University of Michigan to develop the first inactivated flu vaccine with support from the U.S. Army. Their vaccine uses fertilized chicken eggs in a method that is still used to produce most flu vaccines today. The Army is involved with this research because of their experience with troop loss from flu illness and deaths during WWI. This original vaccine only includes an inactivated influenza A virus.
  • 1940s: First-generation mechanical ventilators become available. These machines support breathing in patients suffering respiratory complications.
  • 1940: Influenza B viruses are discovered.
  • 1942: A bivalent (two component) vaccine that offers protection against influenza A and influenza B viruses is produced after the discovery of influenza B viruses.
  • 1944: Use of cell cultures for virus growth is discovered. This allows viruses to be cultured outside the body for the first time. The ability to culture influenza from respiratory secretions allows diagnosis of influenza.
  • 1945: Inactivated influenza vaccine is licensed for use in civilians.
  • 1942: The Communicable Disease Center (CDC) opens in the old offices of the Malaria Control in War Areas, located on Peachtree Street in Atlanta, Georgia with a satellite campus in Chamblee. Launched with fewer than 400 employees, the organization—today the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention–moves to its current main campus on Clifton Road in Atlanta in 1947 after paying $10 to Emory University for 15 acres of land.
  • 1947: During the seasonal flu epidemic of 1947, investigators determine that changes in the antigenic composition of circulating influenza viruses has rendered existing vaccines ineffective, highlighting the need for continuous surveillance and characterization of circulating flu viruses.
  • 1948: The World Health Organization (WHO) Influenza Centre is established at the National Institute for Medical Research in London. The primary tasks of the organization are to collect and characterize influenza viruses, develop methods for the laboratory diagnosis of influenza virus infections, establish a network of laboratories, and disseminate data accumulated from their investigations.
1950s
  • 1952: The Global Influenza Surveillance and Response System (GISRS) is created by WHO to monitor the evolution of influenza viruses. The GISRS network originally includes 26 laboratories.
  • 1956: The CDC’s Influenza Branch in Atlanta is designated a WHO Collaborating Centre for Surveillance, Epidemiology & Control of Influenza.
  • 1957: A new H2N2 flu virus emerges to trigger a pandemic. There are about 1.1 million deaths globally, with about 116,000 in the U.S.
1960s
  • 1960: In 1960, the US Surgeon General, in response to substantial morbidity and mortality during the 1957–58 pandemic, recommends annual influenza vaccination for people with chronic debilitating disease, people aged 65 years or older, and pregnant women.
  • 1961: An outbreak in South Africa raises possibility of wild birds as a possible reservoir for influenza A viruses.
  • 1962: CDC launches the 122 Cities Mortality Reporting System. Each week, the vital statistics office of 122 cities across the U.S. report the total number of death certificates processed and the number of those for which pneumonia or influenza is listed as an underlying or contributing cause of death by age group. The system is retired in October 2016.
  • 1966:  The FDA licenses amantadine, a new antiviral medication, as a prophylactic (preventive medicine) against influenza A. It isn’t effective against influenza B.
  • 1967: Dr. H.G. Pereira and colleagues propose a relationship between human and avian flu viruses after a study shows an antigenic relationship between the 1957 human pandemic A virus and an influenza A virus isolated from a turkey. The study raises the question and triggers the body of work on whether human influenza viruses are of avian origin.
  • 1968: A new H3N2 influenza virus emerges to trigger another pandemic, resulting in roughly 100,000 deaths in the U.S. and 1 million worldwide. Most of those deaths are in people 65 and older. H3N2 viruses circulating today are descendants of the H3N2 virus that emerges in 1968.
1970s
  • An H1N1 (swine flu) outbreak among recruits at Fort Dix leads to a vaccination program to prevent a pandemic. Within 10 months, roughly 25% of the US population is vaccinated (48 million people), about twice the level needed to provide coverage for the at-risk population. Cases of Guillain-Barre syndrome, a neurologic condition that in rare instances has been associated with vaccination, among vaccine recipients appeared to be in excess of what was expected, so officials determine the vaccination program should be halted.  1981: CDC begins collecting reports of influenza outbreaks from state and territorial epidemiologists.
1980s

The AIDS epidemic, caused by HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus), found its way to the United States as early as 1960, but was first noticed after doctors discovered clusters of Kaposi’s sarcoma and pneumocystis pneumonia in gay men in Los Angeles, New York City, and San Francisco in 1981. Treatment of HIV/AIDS is primarily via a “drug cocktail” of antiretroviral drugs, and education programs to help people avoid infection.

  • Initially, infected foreign nationals were turned back at the U.S. border to help prevent additional infections. The number of U.S. deaths from AIDS have declined sharply since the early years of the disease’s presentation domestically. In the United States in 2016, 1.1 million people aged over 13 lived with an HIV infection, of whom 14% were unaware of their infection.
  • As of 2016, about 675,000 people have died of HIV/AIDS in the U.S. since the beginning of the HIV epidemic, and even today, nearly 13,000 people with AIDS in the United States die each year. [3]
  • With improved treatments and better prophylaxis against opportunistic infections, death rates have quite significantly declined.[4]
  • The overall death rate among persons diagnosed with HIV/AIDS in New York City decreased by sixty-two percent from 2001 to 2012.
1990s
  • 1993: The Vaccines for Children (VFC) Program is established as a result of a measles outbreak to provide vaccines at no cost to children whose parents or guardians might not be able to afford them. The program increases the likelihood of children getting recommended vaccinations on schedule.
  • 1993: The costs of influenza vaccine become a covered benefit under Medicare Part B.
  • 1994: Rimantadine, derived from amantadine, is approved by the FDA to treat influenza A.
  • 1996: An avian influenza H5N1 virus is first isolated from a farmed goose in China.
  • 1997: The first human infection with an avian influenza A H5N1 virus is identified in Hong Kong.
  • 1997: FluNet, a web-based flu surveillance tool, is launched by WHO. It is a critical tool for tracking the movement of flu viruses globally. Country data is updated weekly and is publically available.
  • 1998: Influenza virus surveillance in swine, conducted by the US Department of Agriculture, begins in the United States. A virus that is a hybrid of human, bird and swine flu viruses is detected in pigs. This virus becomes the dominant flu virus in U.S. pigs by 1999.
  • 1999: A pandemic planning framework is published by WHO emphasizing the need to enhance influenza surveillance, vaccine production and distribution, antiviral drugs, influenza research and emergency preparedness
  • 1999: The neuraminidase inhibitors oseltamivir (Tamiflu®) and zanamivir (Relenza®) are licensed to treat influenza infection.
2000s
  • April 2002: The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) encourages that children 6 to 23 months of age be vaccinated annually against influenza.
  • 2003: Public health officials are concerned about a re-emergence of H5N1 avian influenza reported in China and Vietnam.
  • June 2003: The first nasal spray flu vaccine is licensed.
  • 2004: The National incident Management System (NIMS) is established to coordinate response for public health incidents that require actions by all levels of government, as well as public, private, and nongovernmental organizations.
  • 2005: The US. Government National Strategy for Pandemic Influenza is published
  • 2005: The entire genome of the 1918 H1N1 pandemic influenza virus is sequenced
  • 2006: CDC stops recommending adamantanes during the 2005-2006 season after high levels of resistance among influenza A viruses. In the US, resistance increased from 1.9% during the 2003-2004 season to 11% in the 2004-2005 season.
  • 2006: The National Strategy for Pandemic Influenza Implementation Plan is published. The document outlines U.S. preparedness and response to prevent the spread of a pandemic.
  • 2007: The American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) establishes the One Health initiative Task Force, an effort to attain optimal health for people, animals, and the environment.
  • 2007: The American Medical Association unanimously approves a resolution calling for increased collaboration between human and veterinary medical communities. The term ‘one health,’ which looks at the interactions between animal and human health, enters the medical and scientific lexicon.
  • 2007: The One Health approach is recommended for pandemic preparedness during the International Ministerial Conference on Avian and Pandemic Influenza
  • 2007: FDA approves the first U.S. vaccine for people against an avian influenza A(H5N1) virus.
  • 2007: Human infection with a novel influenza virus is added to the nationally notifiable disease list
  • 2008:  ACIP expands its influenza vaccination recommendation to include vaccination of children ages 5-18 years.
  • 2008: HHS Pandemic Influenza Operational Plan is published
  • 2008: CDC receives US Food and Drug Administration approval for a highly sensitive influenza polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. These tests can detect influenza with high specificity that enhances diagnosis and treatment options.
  • 2008: The Influenza Reagent Resource (IRR) is established by CDC to provide registered users with reagents, tools, and information to study and detect influenza viruses
  • April 17, 2009:  A new H1N1 virus is detected in the U.S.
  • CDC begins working to develop a virus (called a candidate vaccine virus) that could be used to make vaccine to protect against this new virus.
  • April 25, 2009: The World Health Organization (WHO) declares a public health emergency of international concern.
  • June 11, 2009: WHO officially declares the new 2009 H1N1 outbreak a pandemic.
  • 2009: CDC begins a complex and multi-faceted response to the H1N1 pandemic which lasts more than a year.
  • 2009: Physicians use point of care rapid immunoassay tests to provide influenza results within 15 minutes during the H1N1 pandemic
  • October 5, 2009: The first doses of monovalent H1N1 pandemic vaccine are administered.
2010s
  • August 10, 2010: WHO declares an end to 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic.
  • 2010:  The ACIP recommends annual influenza vaccination for those 6 months of age and older.
  • 2012: Vaccines containing cell-cultured virus become available. Even though eggs continue to be the primary means of production, cell culture emerges as an alternative method for producing influenza vaccines.
  • 2012: WHO makes first vaccine composition recommendation for a quadrivalent vaccine.
  • 2012: CDC partners with Association of Public Health laboratories to define the optimal right size for influenza virologic surveillance. The project produces right-size calculators; statistical tools that help states determine the optimal amount of influenza testing needed for desired confidence levels of surveillance.
  • 2014: The FDA approves peramivir (Rapivab) to treat influenza in adults. It is the first IV flu medication.
  • 2017: CDC updates guidelines for use of non-pharmaceutical measures to help prevent spread of pandemic influenza based on latest scientific evidence. These are actions that individuals and communities can take to help slow spread of the flu like staying home when sick, covering a cough or sneeze, and frequently washing hands.

2020 COVID-19 Information still to be recorded

AYUDO A CONTROLAR EL VIRUS COVID-19 LAVANDO MIS MANOS MUCHAS.


Las Manos a Lavar – Gallina Pintadita 3 – Oficial – Canciones infantiles para niños y bebés

Los Centros para el Control y la Prevención de Enfermedades (CDC) están vigilando de cerca un brote de enfermedad respiratoria causada por un nuevo coronavirus que se identificó por primera vez en Wuhan, en la provincia de Hubei, en China. Esta es una situación emergente que está cambiando rápidamente y los CDC continuarán brindando información actualizada a medida que esté disponible. Los CDC trabajan a toda hora para proteger la salud de las personas. Es función de los CDC preocuparse y actuar rápidamente cada vez que haya un problema potencial para la salud pública. Hay información adicional sobre la respuesta de los CDC al  COVID-19 en inglés. Leer Más

  • Las Manos a Lavar (Letra):
  • La, la, la las manos a lavar
  • A lavar La, la, la las manos
  • a lavar A lavar Para tomar un pan Las manitas,
  • a lavar Antes de comer el lunch Las manitas,
  • a lavar Si fuiste al baño, entonces…
  • Las manitas, a lavar Si tocaste algo sucio en suelo Las manitas,
  • a lavar A lavar las manos
  • Chic, chic, chic
  • A lavar las manos
  • Chic, chic, chic
  • La, la, la, la las manos a lavar
  • La, la, la las manos a lavar
  • A lavar La, la, la las manos a lavar
  • A lavar Al llegar de un paseo
  • Si fuiste al baño
  • Si tomaste el autobús
  • Si jugaste en el piso
  • Espuma, espuma y manos a lavar
  • © Bromelia Produções

KEEPING SAFE THIS WINTER


Remain vigilant about safety in and around the home this winter. Here are three winter hazards to keep in mind.

First, Carbon Monoxide – The Invisible Killer

  • Use portable generators outside your home and place them at least 20 feet away from the residence with exhaust pointed away from spaces where it can gather and present a hazard. Never use a generator inside a home, basement, shed or garage. The exhaust from portable generators contains poisonous carbon monoxide (CO), which can kill in minutes. 
  • Most portable generator-related deaths from CO poisoning occur during the cold months. 
  • Never leave a car running in a garage, even with the garage door open.
  • Install CO alarms in your home on every level and outside all sleeping areas. Test CO alarms monthly. 
  • See our new video here

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Second, Space Heaters – Give Them Space

  • Your space heater needs space. Keep flammable objects, such as curtains, sofas, beds, clothes and papers at least 3 feet away from your space heater at all times.
  • Make sure your space heater is placed on a stable, level, flat surface in an area where it can’t be knocked over.
  • Turn off space heaters when you are sleeping, or when you leave the room. 
  • Install smoke alarms on every floor of your home, outside all sleeping areas, and inside each bedroom. Test smoke alarms once a month to make sure they are working.

Third, Snow Blower Hazards – Clear Snow Safely 

  • Most snow blower injuries happen when consumers try to clear snow from the discharge chute with their hands.
  • NEVER leave a gas-powered snow blower running in an enclosed area. The exhaust contains poisonous carbon monoxide, which can kill in minutes.
  • Don’t add gasoline to a running or hot engine, to avoid a fire; and always keep the gasoline in a portable gasoline container with a child-resistant closure to prevent child poisonings.

One more very important thing… Clear the snow away from your gas meter and away from any pipes around that area.

Protecting your Skin … Cleansing your pores…Fire… Smoke and Ash Fallout. What to Do.


BY: ORGNAT LIFE

MOST IMPORTANTLY: KEEP YOUR FACE, HANDS and EYES COVERED.

Always wash your hands and change clothes as soon as you get home.

Try and keep the contamination to one area.

If you are one of the few that come home to one of the burnt out neighborhoods make sure you exercise caution while out in the elements.

That means anytime you are outside make sure you follow these simple emergency instructions to cleansing your body.

  • You do not want to inhale any of the elements that is on fire or has been burnt out.
  • Respiratory infections and many other illness can be blamed on large burn out fires as these.
  • Think about how many toxic products that are in our homes. Make sure if moving one of these items you are prepared with emergency protection gear.
  • Refrigerator, microwaves, cars, carpet, wood flooring that has been treated and those are just a few things that every home may have.

Your home and residing in the neighborhood: Set up an area that you can seal off. If you have a separate hall way that you can close off with plastic or a separate entry, perhaps through the side garage door(not a big one)with door to house. Handy to change contaminated clothes.

Even though your area may not have flames crawling up your street or that you can actually see, remember embers and ash can float through the air. It will glide until it gets caught on a branch or something to cling onto.

Make sure you bath each night before you go to bed.

Open your pores with warm water and use a good scrubby or washcloth with loads of soap. Soap up really good. Use cold water after to wash the soap off and close your pores.

Keep all of your smoke clothes in a plastic bag in your sealed area until you wash them. You don’t want to spread the smell or contaminate any other area.

If you are in close vicinity of the devastated areas: Do Not run any fans or air conditioning that has a connetion to outdoors. Close all doors, windows and vents. Close blinds and curtains to keep sun out and temperatures down in the house.