Tag Archives: COVID19

WARNING: New Coronavirus Symptom Appears On Skin


Recently, French Dermatologists revealed that they may have stumbled onto a new COVID-19 symptom.

There are many strains, forms or types of this virus that have all originated from one original virus. It has come in many forms over the years. Animal related to human to slaughtering of millions of chickens throughout the world. Now COVID-19 drops in and kills thousands accross the world. Closes many countries including the USA, right when becoming happy and financially secure once again was actually happening.

We already know the usual symptoms are a dry or constant cough, shortness of breath, fever, flu-like symptoms and headaches. All of these are already proven to be COVID-19 symptoms of a person suffering from the COVID-19 virus.

However, newer symptoms related to the corona virus form COVID-19 are starting to appear as scientists, doctors and experts fighting time to get more information to get a handle on this COVID-19 virus.

Now dermatologists in France have found the virus can cause unusual manifestations on the skin that might signal infection.

According to the New York Post, the French National Union of Dermatologists-Venereologists (SNDV), found dermatological signs like pseudo-frostbite, hives, blisters and persistent redness have been associated with COVID-19. The sudden redness can be painful, said the doctors.

FRANCE – SNDV REPORTS in a press release.: “We are alerting the public and the medical profession in order to detect these potentially contagious patients as quickly as possible.
The doctors advised patients to seek medical consultations in the event they experience such symptoms.
According to The Hospitalist, skin manifestations were also observed in one-fifth of a group of patients with COVID-19 in the Alessandro Manzoni Hospital in Lecco, in northern Italy.

Honestly, DOES ANYONE KNOW What We Are Dealing With?

2020 Vs. 2009 INFLUENZA, A VIRUS KILLED 575,400 HUMANS, BARELY A WORD AND TELEVISION DIDN’T CRY “PANDEMIC”…


HERE’S SOMETHING YOU NEED IN YOUR BRAIN… RESEARCH

REALITY of just how many have died from other virus’s. Why all of a sudden does this virus rate so high on a death scale as “PANDEMIC”?

Corona virus has many different strains reported by CDC.

Human Coronavirus Types

Coronaviruses are named for the crown-like spikes on their surface. There are four main sub-groupings of coronaviruses, known as alpha, beta, gamma, and delta.

Human coronaviruses were first identified in the mid-1960s. The seven coronaviruses that can infect people are:

Common human coronaviruses

  1. 229E (alpha coronavirus)
  2. NL63 (alpha coronavirus)
  3. OC43 (beta coronavirus)
  4. HKU1 (beta coronavirus)

Other human coronaviruses

  1. MERS-CoV (the beta coronavirus that causes Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, or MERS)
  2. SARS-CoV (the beta coronavirus that causes severe acute respiratory syndrome, or SARS)
  3. SARS-CoV-2 (the novel coronavirus that causes coronavirus disease 2019, or COVID-19)

People around the world commonly get infected with human coronaviruses 229E, NL63, OC43, and HKU1.

Sometimes coronaviruses that infect animals can evolve and make people sick and become a new human coronavirus. Three recent examples of this are 2019-nCoV, SARS-CoV, and MERS-CoV.

Timeline:
Early 1900s –The avian flu is first identified in Italy.

1961 – The H5N1 strain is isolated in birds in South Africa.

December 1983 – Chickens in Pennsylvania and Virginia are exposed to the avian flu and more than five million birds are killed to stop the disease from spreading.

1997 – Eighteenpeople are infected by the H5N1 strain in Hong Kong, six die. These are the first documented cases of human infection. Hong Kong destroys its entire poultry population, 1.5 million birds.

1999 – Two children in Hong Kong are infected by the H9N2 strain.

February 2003 – Eighty-fourpeople in the Netherlands are affected by the H7N7 strain of the virus, one dies.

February 7, 2004 – Twelve thousand chickens are killed in Kent County, Delaware, after they are found to be infected with the H7 virus.

October 7, 2005 – The avian flu reaches Europe. Romanian officials quarantine a village of about 30 people after three dead ducks there test positive for bird flu.

November 12, 2005 – A one-year-old boy in Thailand tests positive for the H5N1 strain of avian influenza.

November 16, 2005 – TheWorld Health Organization confirms two human cases of bird flu in China, including a female poultry worker who died from the H5N1 strain.

November 17, 2005 – Two deaths are confirmed in Indonesia from the H5N1 strain of avian influenza.

January 1, 2006 – A Turkish teenager dies of the H5N1 strain of avian influenza in Istanbul, and later that week, two of his sisters die.

January 17, 2006 – A 15-year-old girl from northern Iraq dies after contracting bird flu.

February 20, 2006 – Vietnam becomes the first country to successfully contain the disease. A country is considered disease-free when no new cases are reported in 21 days.

March 12, 2006 – Officials in Cameroon confirm cases of the H5N1 strain. The avian flu has now reached four African countries.

March 13, 2006 – The avian flu is confirmed by officials in Myanmar.

May 11, 2006 – Djibouti announces its first cases of H5N1 – several birds and one human.

December 20, 2011 – The US Department of Health and Human Services releases a statement saying that the government is urging scientific journals to omit details from research they intend to publish on the transfer of H5N1 among mammals. There is concern that the information could be misused by terrorists.

July 31, 2012 – Scientists announce that H3N8, a new strain of avian flu, caused the death of more than 160 baby seals in New England in 2011.

March 31, 2013 – Chinese authorities report the first human cases of infection of avian flu H7N9 to the World Health Organization. H7N9 has not previously been detected in humans.

December 6, 2013 – A 73-year-old woman infected with H10N8 dies in China, the first human fatality from this strain

.January 8, 2014 – Canadian health officials confirm that a resident from Alberta has died from H5N1 avian flu, the first case of the virus in North America. It is also the first case of H5N1 infection ever imported by a traveler into a country where the virus is not present in poultry.

April 20, 2015 – Officials say more than five million hens will be euthanized after bird flu was detected at a commercial laying facility in northwest Iowa. According to the US Department of Agriculture, close to eight million cases of bird flu have been detected in 13 states since December. Health officials say there is little to no risk for transmission to humans with respect to H5N2. No human infections with the virus have ever been detected

.January 15, 2016 – The US Department of Agriculture confirms that a commercial turkey farm in Dubois County, Indiana, has tested positive for the H7N8 strain of avian influenza.

January 24, 2017 – Britain’s Department for Environment, Food & Rural Affairs releases a statement confirming that a case of H5N8 avian flu has been detected in a flock of farmed breeding pheasants in Preston, UK. The flock is estimated to contain around 10,000 birds. The statement adds that a number of those birds have died, and the remaining live birds at the premises are being “humanely” killed because of disease.

February 12, 2017 – A number of provinces in China have shut down their live poultry markets to prevent the spread of avian flu after a surge in the number of infections from the H7N9 strain. At least six provinces have reported human cases of H7N9 influenza this year, according to Chinese state media, Xinhua.

March 5-7, 2017 – The USDA confirms that a commercial chicken farm in Tennessee has tested positive for the H7N9 strain of avian flu, but says it is genetically different from the H7N9 lineage out of China. The 73,500-bird flock in Lincoln County will be euthanized, according to Tyson Foods.

February 14, 2018 – Hong Kong’s Centre for Health Protection announces that a 68-year-old woman has been treated for the H7N4 strain. This is the first case of this strain in a human.

June 5, 2019 –Since 2013 there have been 1,568 confirmed human cases and 616 deaths worldwide from the H7N9 strain of avian flu, according to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations.

WHO IS CRYING WOLF??? WHY IS COVID-19 VIRUS SO MUCH MORE DANGEROUS THAN ANY OF THE OTHERS?

In June 2009, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared the new strain of swine-origin H1N1 as a pandemic. This novel virus spread worldwide and had caused 18,500 laboratory-confirmed deaths with an estimated 151,700 to 575,400 deaths total[3][4] by August of 2010.

On 10 August 2010, the World Health Organization declared the H1N1 influenza pandemic over, saying worldwide flu activity had returned to typical seasonal patterns.

WOW did you ever hear anything hear about that one… Nope Did they shut down the country? NOPE

April 21, 20155:09 PM ET Heard on All Things Considered

NPR REPORTS: Millions Of Chickens are KILLED due to H5N1 Aviary Flu

Dan Charles Twitter

KEEP ACTIVE AND GET IN THE SUN AND BREATH THAT FRESH AIR IN AS MUCH AS POSSIBLE!!!

What is a Virus?


A virus is a submicroscopic infectious agent that replicates only inside the living cells of an organism. Viruses can infect all types of life forms, from animals and plants to microorganisms, including bacteria and archaea.[1] Since Dmitri Ivanovsky‘s 1892 article describing a non-bacterial pathogen infecting tobacco plants, and the discovery of the tobacco mosaic virus by Martinus Beijerinck in 1898,[2] about 5,000 virus species have been described in detail,[3] of the millions of types of viruses in the environment.[4] Viruses are found in almost every ecosystem on Earth and are the most numerous type of biological entity.[5][6] The study of viruses is known as virology, a subspeciality of microbiology.

By derivative work: MouagipAntigenicShift HiRes.png: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID). – AntigenicShift HiRes.png, Public Domain, Link

An influenza pandemic is a global outbreak of a new influenza A virus that is very different from current and recently circulating human seasonal influenza A viruses. Influenza A viruses are constantly changing, making it possible on very rare occasions for non-human influenza viruses to change in such a way that they can infect people easily and spread efficiently from person to person.

Pigs experimentally infected with the strain of swine flu that caused the human pandemic of 2009–10 showed clinical signs of flu within four days, and the virus spread to other uninfected pigs housed with the infected ones and then to humans.

Influenza Historic Timeline


JUST REMEMBER… This is not the first virus pandemic and it’s not the last…

STRESS will kill you before the virus. So take a deep breath, relax and stay at home where you are safe.

Below is a historical timeline of major scientific and public health events and milestones in influenza prevention recorded by the CDC.

1930s
1940s
  • 1940s: Thomas Francis, Jr., MD and Jonas Salk, MD serve as lead researchers at the University of Michigan to develop the first inactivated flu vaccine with support from the U.S. Army. Their vaccine uses fertilized chicken eggs in a method that is still used to produce most flu vaccines today. The Army is involved with this research because of their experience with troop loss from flu illness and deaths during WWI. This original vaccine only includes an inactivated influenza A virus.
  • 1940s: First-generation mechanical ventilators become available. These machines support breathing in patients suffering respiratory complications.
  • 1940: Influenza B viruses are discovered.
  • 1942: A bivalent (two component) vaccine that offers protection against influenza A and influenza B viruses is produced after the discovery of influenza B viruses.
  • 1944: Use of cell cultures for virus growth is discovered. This allows viruses to be cultured outside the body for the first time. The ability to culture influenza from respiratory secretions allows diagnosis of influenza.
  • 1945: Inactivated influenza vaccine is licensed for use in civilians.
  • 1942: The Communicable Disease Center (CDC) opens in the old offices of the Malaria Control in War Areas, located on Peachtree Street in Atlanta, Georgia with a satellite campus in Chamblee. Launched with fewer than 400 employees, the organization—today the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention–moves to its current main campus on Clifton Road in Atlanta in 1947 after paying $10 to Emory University for 15 acres of land.
  • 1947: During the seasonal flu epidemic of 1947, investigators determine that changes in the antigenic composition of circulating influenza viruses has rendered existing vaccines ineffective, highlighting the need for continuous surveillance and characterization of circulating flu viruses.
  • 1948: The World Health Organization (WHO) Influenza Centre is established at the National Institute for Medical Research in London. The primary tasks of the organization are to collect and characterize influenza viruses, develop methods for the laboratory diagnosis of influenza virus infections, establish a network of laboratories, and disseminate data accumulated from their investigations.
1950s
  • 1952: The Global Influenza Surveillance and Response System (GISRS) is created by WHO to monitor the evolution of influenza viruses. The GISRS network originally includes 26 laboratories.
  • 1956: The CDC’s Influenza Branch in Atlanta is designated a WHO Collaborating Centre for Surveillance, Epidemiology & Control of Influenza.
  • 1957: A new H2N2 flu virus emerges to trigger a pandemic. There are about 1.1 million deaths globally, with about 116,000 in the U.S.
1960s
  • 1960: In 1960, the US Surgeon General, in response to substantial morbidity and mortality during the 1957–58 pandemic, recommends annual influenza vaccination for people with chronic debilitating disease, people aged 65 years or older, and pregnant women.
  • 1961: An outbreak in South Africa raises possibility of wild birds as a possible reservoir for influenza A viruses.
  • 1962: CDC launches the 122 Cities Mortality Reporting System. Each week, the vital statistics office of 122 cities across the U.S. report the total number of death certificates processed and the number of those for which pneumonia or influenza is listed as an underlying or contributing cause of death by age group. The system is retired in October 2016.
  • 1966:  The FDA licenses amantadine, a new antiviral medication, as a prophylactic (preventive medicine) against influenza A. It isn’t effective against influenza B.
  • 1967: Dr. H.G. Pereira and colleagues propose a relationship between human and avian flu viruses after a study shows an antigenic relationship between the 1957 human pandemic A virus and an influenza A virus isolated from a turkey. The study raises the question and triggers the body of work on whether human influenza viruses are of avian origin.
  • 1968: A new H3N2 influenza virus emerges to trigger another pandemic, resulting in roughly 100,000 deaths in the U.S. and 1 million worldwide. Most of those deaths are in people 65 and older. H3N2 viruses circulating today are descendants of the H3N2 virus that emerges in 1968.
1970s
  • An H1N1 (swine flu) outbreak among recruits at Fort Dix leads to a vaccination program to prevent a pandemic. Within 10 months, roughly 25% of the US population is vaccinated (48 million people), about twice the level needed to provide coverage for the at-risk population. Cases of Guillain-Barre syndrome, a neurologic condition that in rare instances has been associated with vaccination, among vaccine recipients appeared to be in excess of what was expected, so officials determine the vaccination program should be halted.  1981: CDC begins collecting reports of influenza outbreaks from state and territorial epidemiologists.
1980s

The AIDS epidemic, caused by HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus), found its way to the United States as early as 1960, but was first noticed after doctors discovered clusters of Kaposi’s sarcoma and pneumocystis pneumonia in gay men in Los Angeles, New York City, and San Francisco in 1981. Treatment of HIV/AIDS is primarily via a “drug cocktail” of antiretroviral drugs, and education programs to help people avoid infection.

  • Initially, infected foreign nationals were turned back at the U.S. border to help prevent additional infections. The number of U.S. deaths from AIDS have declined sharply since the early years of the disease’s presentation domestically. In the United States in 2016, 1.1 million people aged over 13 lived with an HIV infection, of whom 14% were unaware of their infection.
  • As of 2016, about 675,000 people have died of HIV/AIDS in the U.S. since the beginning of the HIV epidemic, and even today, nearly 13,000 people with AIDS in the United States die each year. [3]
  • With improved treatments and better prophylaxis against opportunistic infections, death rates have quite significantly declined.[4]
  • The overall death rate among persons diagnosed with HIV/AIDS in New York City decreased by sixty-two percent from 2001 to 2012.
1990s
  • 1993: The Vaccines for Children (VFC) Program is established as a result of a measles outbreak to provide vaccines at no cost to children whose parents or guardians might not be able to afford them. The program increases the likelihood of children getting recommended vaccinations on schedule.
  • 1993: The costs of influenza vaccine become a covered benefit under Medicare Part B.
  • 1994: Rimantadine, derived from amantadine, is approved by the FDA to treat influenza A.
  • 1996: An avian influenza H5N1 virus is first isolated from a farmed goose in China.
  • 1997: The first human infection with an avian influenza A H5N1 virus is identified in Hong Kong.
  • 1997: FluNet, a web-based flu surveillance tool, is launched by WHO. It is a critical tool for tracking the movement of flu viruses globally. Country data is updated weekly and is publically available.
  • 1998: Influenza virus surveillance in swine, conducted by the US Department of Agriculture, begins in the United States. A virus that is a hybrid of human, bird and swine flu viruses is detected in pigs. This virus becomes the dominant flu virus in U.S. pigs by 1999.
  • 1999: A pandemic planning framework is published by WHO emphasizing the need to enhance influenza surveillance, vaccine production and distribution, antiviral drugs, influenza research and emergency preparedness
  • 1999: The neuraminidase inhibitors oseltamivir (Tamiflu®) and zanamivir (Relenza®) are licensed to treat influenza infection.
2000s
  • April 2002: The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) encourages that children 6 to 23 months of age be vaccinated annually against influenza.
  • 2003: Public health officials are concerned about a re-emergence of H5N1 avian influenza reported in China and Vietnam.
  • June 2003: The first nasal spray flu vaccine is licensed.
  • 2004: The National incident Management System (NIMS) is established to coordinate response for public health incidents that require actions by all levels of government, as well as public, private, and nongovernmental organizations.
  • 2005: The US. Government National Strategy for Pandemic Influenza is published
  • 2005: The entire genome of the 1918 H1N1 pandemic influenza virus is sequenced
  • 2006: CDC stops recommending adamantanes during the 2005-2006 season after high levels of resistance among influenza A viruses. In the US, resistance increased from 1.9% during the 2003-2004 season to 11% in the 2004-2005 season.
  • 2006: The National Strategy for Pandemic Influenza Implementation Plan is published. The document outlines U.S. preparedness and response to prevent the spread of a pandemic.
  • 2007: The American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) establishes the One Health initiative Task Force, an effort to attain optimal health for people, animals, and the environment.
  • 2007: The American Medical Association unanimously approves a resolution calling for increased collaboration between human and veterinary medical communities. The term ‘one health,’ which looks at the interactions between animal and human health, enters the medical and scientific lexicon.
  • 2007: The One Health approach is recommended for pandemic preparedness during the International Ministerial Conference on Avian and Pandemic Influenza
  • 2007: FDA approves the first U.S. vaccine for people against an avian influenza A(H5N1) virus.
  • 2007: Human infection with a novel influenza virus is added to the nationally notifiable disease list
  • 2008:  ACIP expands its influenza vaccination recommendation to include vaccination of children ages 5-18 years.
  • 2008: HHS Pandemic Influenza Operational Plan is published
  • 2008: CDC receives US Food and Drug Administration approval for a highly sensitive influenza polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. These tests can detect influenza with high specificity that enhances diagnosis and treatment options.
  • 2008: The Influenza Reagent Resource (IRR) is established by CDC to provide registered users with reagents, tools, and information to study and detect influenza viruses
  • April 17, 2009:  A new H1N1 virus is detected in the U.S.
  • CDC begins working to develop a virus (called a candidate vaccine virus) that could be used to make vaccine to protect against this new virus.
  • April 25, 2009: The World Health Organization (WHO) declares a public health emergency of international concern.
  • June 11, 2009: WHO officially declares the new 2009 H1N1 outbreak a pandemic.
  • 2009: CDC begins a complex and multi-faceted response to the H1N1 pandemic which lasts more than a year.
  • 2009: Physicians use point of care rapid immunoassay tests to provide influenza results within 15 minutes during the H1N1 pandemic
  • October 5, 2009: The first doses of monovalent H1N1 pandemic vaccine are administered.
2010s
  • August 10, 2010: WHO declares an end to 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic.
  • 2010:  The ACIP recommends annual influenza vaccination for those 6 months of age and older.
  • 2012: Vaccines containing cell-cultured virus become available. Even though eggs continue to be the primary means of production, cell culture emerges as an alternative method for producing influenza vaccines.
  • 2012: WHO makes first vaccine composition recommendation for a quadrivalent vaccine.
  • 2012: CDC partners with Association of Public Health laboratories to define the optimal right size for influenza virologic surveillance. The project produces right-size calculators; statistical tools that help states determine the optimal amount of influenza testing needed for desired confidence levels of surveillance.
  • 2014: The FDA approves peramivir (Rapivab) to treat influenza in adults. It is the first IV flu medication.
  • 2017: CDC updates guidelines for use of non-pharmaceutical measures to help prevent spread of pandemic influenza based on latest scientific evidence. These are actions that individuals and communities can take to help slow spread of the flu like staying home when sick, covering a cough or sneeze, and frequently washing hands.

2020 COVID-19 Information still to be recorded

PLAIN ASS TRUTH…


Leave your Air Conditioning off and open your doors and windows.

Same for your car… Leave the windows down and air condition off. Heat on is great.

Go Outside and sit in the sun!!!

DO NOT DUMP YOUR PETS. EDUCATE and KEEP THEM SAFE WITH YOU…


Get The Answers You Need About Your Pets and COVID-19 With Dr. Karen Becker

It’s important to keep in mind that at the present time this is an ever-evolving situation rife with competing theories and conspiracies, widespread mis- and disinformation, politics, etc. My goal today is to update you about what we know at this point regarding COVID-19 and furry family members.

Animals and COVID-19

According to veterinary publication dvm360, there are reports of animals being abandoned or killed because their owners fear they might harbor COVID-19.1 This is an absolutely unnecessary and tragic situation.

While it’s clear we’re still learning about this virus, at this time the WHO website maintains this particular type of coronavirus can be transmitted from human to human. From the OIE World Organisation for Animal Health Questions and Answers on the 2019 Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19) webpage:2

“Are animals responsible for COVID-19 in people?

The predominant route of transmission of COVID-19 appears to be from human to human.

Current evidence suggests that the COVID-19 virus has an animal source. Ongoing investigations are important for identifying the animal source (including species involved) and establishing the potential role of an animal reservoir in this disease. Yet, to date, there is not enough scientific evidence to identify that source or to explain the route of transmission from an animal source to humans.

Genetic sequence data reveals that the COVID-19 virus is a close relative of other CoV found circulating in Rhinolophus bat (Horseshoe Bat) populations. There is the possibility that transmission to humans involved an intermediate host.

Priorities for research to investigate the animal source were discussed by the OIE informal advisory group on COVID-19 and were presented at the WHO Global Research and Innovation Forum (11-12 February 2020) by the President of the OIE Wildlife Working Group. The outcomes from the discussion of the OIE informal advisory group on COVID-19 can be found at the link.”

Pets, COVID-19, and Confirmed Infection in One Dog in Hong Kong

Also from the OIE World Organisation for Animal Health Questions and Answers on the 2019 Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19) webpage:3

“What do we know about COVID-19 virus and companion animals?

The current spread of COVID-19 is a result of human to human transmission. To date, there is no evidence that companion animals can spread the disease. Therefore, there is no justification in taking measures against companion animals which may compromise their welfare.

The Veterinary Services of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the People’s Republic of China reported to OIE evidence that a dog had tested positive to the COVID-19 virus following close exposure to its owners who were sick with COVID-19 – see Immediate Notification (03/01/2020) and Follow-up report no.1 (03/08/2020).

The test, conducted by real time PCR, showed the presence of genetic material from the COVID-19 virus. The dog [a 17-year-old Pomeranian] was not showing any clinical signs of the disease.

There is no evidence that dogs play a role in the spread of this human disease or that they become sick. Further studies are needed to understand if and how different animals could be affected by COVID-19 virus. The OIE will continue to provide updates as new information becomes available.

There is no evidence to support restrictions to movement or trade of companion animals.”

According to a post on March 9th in PetfoodIndustry.com:

“Veterinarians confirmed that the coronavirus had infected the dog too after taking nasal, oral and rectal swabs, along with fecal samples. The World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) published a report of the emerging disease, listing this case as the first known in dogs.

Nasal and oral samples tested positive for the presence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the name of virus responsible for COVID-19. However, the dog hasn’t shown any outward signs of illness. Follow-up oral and nasal samples taken on March 2 and 5 continues to test positive.

Doctors and veterinarians don’t know if the COVID-19 virus has the potential to be zoonotic, or transmitted from dogs to people.

Doctors don’t know if the dog got the virus directly from its owner, or through an intermediary species. Likewise, doctors don’t know how the virus was transmitted to the dog, whether by airborne particles, direct contact or bodily fluids.

In Hong Kong, health authorities quarantine mammalian pets from households with confirmed human cases of COVID-19 and place the animals under veterinary surveillance for 14 days, according to the report.”4

Why Pet Parents Should NOT Hit the Panic Button

Many veterinarians have called for calm after the announcement, reminding owners this doesn’t mean dogs can get sick from the virus or transmit it back to humans. Panic makes people do foolish, regrettable things, which is what has occurred in Wuhan. From a March 4th post in the Whole Dog Journal:

“Tragically, within days [of the report of the single infected dog], there were reports of a record number of dogs and other pets being abandoned in China’s streets, and thousands of pets being surrendered to overwhelmed animal shelters — despite the fact that there is no indication that the COVID-19 virus is zoonotic.

Time magazine reports that the crisis for pet dogs and cats is the worst in Wuhan, the capital city of the Hubei province where the first cases of COVID-19 are believed to have emerged. Time reports that when a person in Wuhan is found to have COVID-19, the authorities kill all animals in the home as a precaution.

This report was corroborated by a reporter for the BBC (British news service):

‘Volunteers in China say they’re struggling to keep up with the number of animals being abandoned as the country battles the virus outbreak. More than 2,000 people in China have died and more than 78,000 infections have been reported in the country.

Pet owners who fall sick or are caught up in quarantine can’t take their animals with them, and despite reassurance from the World Health Organization that animals can’t carry the virus, others are being dumped.’”5

The Centers for Disease Control is now advising people with COVID-19 to avoid close contact with their pets, but on February 28th, Dr. Jonathan Ball at the University of Nottingham has called the widespread panic about the news “incredibly irresponsible”:

“There is no evidence that the human novel coronavirus can infect dogs and it would be incredible for a virus to make so many species jumps in such a short space of time!

We have to differentiate between real infection and just detecting the presence of a virus – these are very different – and the fact that the test result was weakly positive would suggest that this is environmental contamination or simply the presence of coronavirus shed from the human contact that has ended up in the dog’s samples.

In truth this is incredibly irresponsible because the last thing we need to do is create mass hysteria about the possibility of dogs being infected, and therefore potentially transmitting this virus when there is absolutely no evidence for this whatsoever.”6

If You’re a Pet Parent, Do This Instead

From the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) COVID-19 website:

“The precise meaning of the positive test result from the one dog remains unclear and further evaluation is ongoing. Hong Kong officials said that dog continues to show no clinical signs of illness, remains under quarantine and is being cared for, and will continue to be monitored and tested.

We will keep you updated you as we learn more. At this time, the CDC, the World Health Organization (WHO), and the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) say there is no evidence that companion animals, including pets, spread COVID-19.

As always, it’s a good idea to wash your hands after being around animals, and animal owners should continue to include pets and other animals in their emergency preparedness planning, including keeping a two-week supply of food and medications on hand.”7

If someone in your household is diagnosed with the virus and you feel additional precautions are necessary, the following is from the CDC:

“Considerations for COVID-19 patients under home care and isolation who have pets or other animals:

People with COVID-19 should be advised to tell their public health point of contact that they have pets or other animals in their home.

In addition to other prevention measures, people with COVID-19 who are identified by public health officials as requiring home care and isolation should be advised to limit interaction with pets and other animals.

Specifically, while these people are symptomatic, they should maintain separation from pets as they would with other household members, and avoid direct contact with pets, including petting, snuggling, being kissed or licked, and sharing food. Service animals should be permitted to remain with their handlers.

If possible, a household member should be designated to care for pets in the home. If the individual in home care and isolation must care for pet(s), including service animals, they should ensure they wash their hands before and after caring for pets and wear a facemask while interacting with pets, until they are medically cleared to return to normal activities.”8

Nature to the Rescue?

The race is on to not only learn more about how COVID-19 affects other species but for biotech companies to produce a slew of pharmaceutical products in response to this latest disease outbreak.

Interestingly, the most accessible and effective treatment may already exist at your local health food store. Dr. Michel Chrétien’s Montreal laboratory is testing quercetin, an all-natural extract from plants, and its derivatives, as a possible “broad spectrum” antiviral medication. Clinical trials began in China a few weeks ago.9

Dr. Mercola has also published important recent articles on this topic, on February 24th: Vitamin C Works for Sepsis. Will It Work for Coronavirus? and on March 9th: Essential Nutrition to Protect Yourself From Coronavirus

FOLLOW Dr. Karen Becker VM, @Healthy Pets at Mercola

AYUDO A CONTROLAR EL VIRUS COVID-19 LAVANDO MIS MANOS MUCHAS.


Las Manos a Lavar – Gallina Pintadita 3 – Oficial – Canciones infantiles para niños y bebés

Los Centros para el Control y la Prevención de Enfermedades (CDC) están vigilando de cerca un brote de enfermedad respiratoria causada por un nuevo coronavirus que se identificó por primera vez en Wuhan, en la provincia de Hubei, en China. Esta es una situación emergente que está cambiando rápidamente y los CDC continuarán brindando información actualizada a medida que esté disponible. Los CDC trabajan a toda hora para proteger la salud de las personas. Es función de los CDC preocuparse y actuar rápidamente cada vez que haya un problema potencial para la salud pública. Hay información adicional sobre la respuesta de los CDC al  COVID-19 en inglés. Leer Más

  • Las Manos a Lavar (Letra):
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MUST SEE VIDEO… TiKToK CORONAVIRUS SONG GONE VIRAL lol


 

coronavirus song vietnam health department
VIDEO BELOW STORY

 

Vietnamese Corona virus TikTok songs taking over the internet as a challenge.

Thanks to YouTuber: Nikki Châu Ngọc Trân who translated this into English.

IN HER OWN WORDS, Nikki Châu Ngọc Trân

Hi everyone. I came across the video and liked it so much, I translated the lyrics into English and add as subtitles. The original video is here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BtulL….

My English translation is here. Vietnamese original text is below. I took some tiny creative license with the translation to make the text flow in English, such as “fight coronavirus” instead of “push back coronavirus”.

VIDEO CONTEXT:
Ghen means jealous. Cô Vy appears to be a word play on Covid. Cô means lady. Vy is a common Vietnamese name. The video is portraying the virus as someone who’s trying to come between a couple. At the beginning of the video the couple was fighting and at the end they came together. And yes, the video does perpetuate gender roles. (This song is based on another song the same musicians made: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vk8_0…)

TRANSLATED TEXT:
“‘Ghen Cô Vy’ is creation of the Vietnamese Institute of Occupational and Environmental Health, in collaboration with musicians Khac Hung, Min, and Erik.

Through this project, we aim to empower and strengthen trust in the community, so that we can join hands to combat COVID-19 (aka nCoV-2019).

In this critical moment of fighting the virus, we hope the song will ignite our spirits and reduce stress for the frontline fighters of this war: the team of experts, physicians, health workers and millions of other workers who are in the frontline of exposure and daily struggle with this disease.

Let our community take the initiative in implementing preventive habits as recommended by health experts, and let us spread goodness and kindness to win the disease together.”

CREDITS:
Producer: Institute of Occupational and Environmental Health
Music & Lyrics: Khắc Hưng
Singer: Min x Erik
Visual: Yang Animation Artist

ORIGINAL VIETNAMESE TEXT:
“‘Ghen Cô Vy’ là 1 dự án sáng tạo của Viện Sức khoẻ nghề nghiệp và môi trường, hợp tác với nhạc sĩ Khắc Hưng , ca sĩ Min và ca sĩ Erik.

Qua dự án này, chúng tôi mong muốn được tiếp thêm sức mạnh và niềm tin cho cộng đồng, để chúng ta cùng chung tay chống dịch COVID-19 (hay còn gọi là nCoV-2019).

Trong thời khắc quan trọng chiến đấu với dịch bệnh này, chúng tôi mong ca khúc có thể truyền thêm lửa và bớt chút căng thẳng cho những chiến sĩ tuyến đầu của cuộc chiến này. Đó là đội ngũ chuyên gia, các y bác sĩ, các nhân viên y tế và hàng triệu người lao động, những người ở tiền tuyến vẫn tiếp xúc và đấu tranh hàng ngày với dịch bệnh.

Cộng đồng chúng ta hãy cùng nhau chủ động thực hiện các thói quen phòng bệnh theo khuyến cáo của các cơ quan chuyên môn và lan toả những điều tử tế, tốt đẹp để cùng nhau chiến thắng dịch bệnh.”

“Jealous Coronavirus” music video from Vietnamese Health Dept. w/ English subtitles

https://youtu.be/6Ud_MP3dj7k