Tag Archives: coronavirus

WARNING: New Coronavirus Symptom Appears On Skin


Recently, French Dermatologists revealed that they may have stumbled onto a new COVID-19 symptom.

There are many strains, forms or types of this virus that have all originated from one original virus. It has come in many forms over the years. Animal related to human to slaughtering of millions of chickens throughout the world. Now COVID-19 drops in and kills thousands accross the world. Closes many countries including the USA, right when becoming happy and financially secure once again was actually happening.

We already know the usual symptoms are a dry or constant cough, shortness of breath, fever, flu-like symptoms and headaches. All of these are already proven to be COVID-19 symptoms of a person suffering from the COVID-19 virus.

However, newer symptoms related to the corona virus form COVID-19 are starting to appear as scientists, doctors and experts fighting time to get more information to get a handle on this COVID-19 virus.

Now dermatologists in France have found the virus can cause unusual manifestations on the skin that might signal infection.

According to the New York Post, the French National Union of Dermatologists-Venereologists (SNDV), found dermatological signs like pseudo-frostbite, hives, blisters and persistent redness have been associated with COVID-19. The sudden redness can be painful, said the doctors.

FRANCE – SNDV REPORTS in a press release.: “We are alerting the public and the medical profession in order to detect these potentially contagious patients as quickly as possible.
The doctors advised patients to seek medical consultations in the event they experience such symptoms.
According to The Hospitalist, skin manifestations were also observed in one-fifth of a group of patients with COVID-19 in the Alessandro Manzoni Hospital in Lecco, in northern Italy.

Honestly, DOES ANYONE KNOW What We Are Dealing With?

What is a Virus?


A virus is a submicroscopic infectious agent that replicates only inside the living cells of an organism. Viruses can infect all types of life forms, from animals and plants to microorganisms, including bacteria and archaea.[1] Since Dmitri Ivanovsky‘s 1892 article describing a non-bacterial pathogen infecting tobacco plants, and the discovery of the tobacco mosaic virus by Martinus Beijerinck in 1898,[2] about 5,000 virus species have been described in detail,[3] of the millions of types of viruses in the environment.[4] Viruses are found in almost every ecosystem on Earth and are the most numerous type of biological entity.[5][6] The study of viruses is known as virology, a subspeciality of microbiology.

By derivative work: MouagipAntigenicShift HiRes.png: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID). – AntigenicShift HiRes.png, Public Domain, Link

An influenza pandemic is a global outbreak of a new influenza A virus that is very different from current and recently circulating human seasonal influenza A viruses. Influenza A viruses are constantly changing, making it possible on very rare occasions for non-human influenza viruses to change in such a way that they can infect people easily and spread efficiently from person to person.

Pigs experimentally infected with the strain of swine flu that caused the human pandemic of 2009–10 showed clinical signs of flu within four days, and the virus spread to other uninfected pigs housed with the infected ones and then to humans.

DO NOT DUMP YOUR PETS. EDUCATE and KEEP THEM SAFE WITH YOU…


Get The Answers You Need About Your Pets and COVID-19 With Dr. Karen Becker

It’s important to keep in mind that at the present time this is an ever-evolving situation rife with competing theories and conspiracies, widespread mis- and disinformation, politics, etc. My goal today is to update you about what we know at this point regarding COVID-19 and furry family members.

Animals and COVID-19

According to veterinary publication dvm360, there are reports of animals being abandoned or killed because their owners fear they might harbor COVID-19.1 This is an absolutely unnecessary and tragic situation.

While it’s clear we’re still learning about this virus, at this time the WHO website maintains this particular type of coronavirus can be transmitted from human to human. From the OIE World Organisation for Animal Health Questions and Answers on the 2019 Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19) webpage:2

“Are animals responsible for COVID-19 in people?

The predominant route of transmission of COVID-19 appears to be from human to human.

Current evidence suggests that the COVID-19 virus has an animal source. Ongoing investigations are important for identifying the animal source (including species involved) and establishing the potential role of an animal reservoir in this disease. Yet, to date, there is not enough scientific evidence to identify that source or to explain the route of transmission from an animal source to humans.

Genetic sequence data reveals that the COVID-19 virus is a close relative of other CoV found circulating in Rhinolophus bat (Horseshoe Bat) populations. There is the possibility that transmission to humans involved an intermediate host.

Priorities for research to investigate the animal source were discussed by the OIE informal advisory group on COVID-19 and were presented at the WHO Global Research and Innovation Forum (11-12 February 2020) by the President of the OIE Wildlife Working Group. The outcomes from the discussion of the OIE informal advisory group on COVID-19 can be found at the link.”

Pets, COVID-19, and Confirmed Infection in One Dog in Hong Kong

Also from the OIE World Organisation for Animal Health Questions and Answers on the 2019 Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19) webpage:3

“What do we know about COVID-19 virus and companion animals?

The current spread of COVID-19 is a result of human to human transmission. To date, there is no evidence that companion animals can spread the disease. Therefore, there is no justification in taking measures against companion animals which may compromise their welfare.

The Veterinary Services of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the People’s Republic of China reported to OIE evidence that a dog had tested positive to the COVID-19 virus following close exposure to its owners who were sick with COVID-19 – see Immediate Notification (03/01/2020) and Follow-up report no.1 (03/08/2020).

The test, conducted by real time PCR, showed the presence of genetic material from the COVID-19 virus. The dog [a 17-year-old Pomeranian] was not showing any clinical signs of the disease.

There is no evidence that dogs play a role in the spread of this human disease or that they become sick. Further studies are needed to understand if and how different animals could be affected by COVID-19 virus. The OIE will continue to provide updates as new information becomes available.

There is no evidence to support restrictions to movement or trade of companion animals.”

According to a post on March 9th in PetfoodIndustry.com:

“Veterinarians confirmed that the coronavirus had infected the dog too after taking nasal, oral and rectal swabs, along with fecal samples. The World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) published a report of the emerging disease, listing this case as the first known in dogs.

Nasal and oral samples tested positive for the presence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the name of virus responsible for COVID-19. However, the dog hasn’t shown any outward signs of illness. Follow-up oral and nasal samples taken on March 2 and 5 continues to test positive.

Doctors and veterinarians don’t know if the COVID-19 virus has the potential to be zoonotic, or transmitted from dogs to people.

Doctors don’t know if the dog got the virus directly from its owner, or through an intermediary species. Likewise, doctors don’t know how the virus was transmitted to the dog, whether by airborne particles, direct contact or bodily fluids.

In Hong Kong, health authorities quarantine mammalian pets from households with confirmed human cases of COVID-19 and place the animals under veterinary surveillance for 14 days, according to the report.”4

Why Pet Parents Should NOT Hit the Panic Button

Many veterinarians have called for calm after the announcement, reminding owners this doesn’t mean dogs can get sick from the virus or transmit it back to humans. Panic makes people do foolish, regrettable things, which is what has occurred in Wuhan. From a March 4th post in the Whole Dog Journal:

“Tragically, within days [of the report of the single infected dog], there were reports of a record number of dogs and other pets being abandoned in China’s streets, and thousands of pets being surrendered to overwhelmed animal shelters — despite the fact that there is no indication that the COVID-19 virus is zoonotic.

Time magazine reports that the crisis for pet dogs and cats is the worst in Wuhan, the capital city of the Hubei province where the first cases of COVID-19 are believed to have emerged. Time reports that when a person in Wuhan is found to have COVID-19, the authorities kill all animals in the home as a precaution.

This report was corroborated by a reporter for the BBC (British news service):

‘Volunteers in China say they’re struggling to keep up with the number of animals being abandoned as the country battles the virus outbreak. More than 2,000 people in China have died and more than 78,000 infections have been reported in the country.

Pet owners who fall sick or are caught up in quarantine can’t take their animals with them, and despite reassurance from the World Health Organization that animals can’t carry the virus, others are being dumped.’”5

The Centers for Disease Control is now advising people with COVID-19 to avoid close contact with their pets, but on February 28th, Dr. Jonathan Ball at the University of Nottingham has called the widespread panic about the news “incredibly irresponsible”:

“There is no evidence that the human novel coronavirus can infect dogs and it would be incredible for a virus to make so many species jumps in such a short space of time!

We have to differentiate between real infection and just detecting the presence of a virus – these are very different – and the fact that the test result was weakly positive would suggest that this is environmental contamination or simply the presence of coronavirus shed from the human contact that has ended up in the dog’s samples.

In truth this is incredibly irresponsible because the last thing we need to do is create mass hysteria about the possibility of dogs being infected, and therefore potentially transmitting this virus when there is absolutely no evidence for this whatsoever.”6

If You’re a Pet Parent, Do This Instead

From the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) COVID-19 website:

“The precise meaning of the positive test result from the one dog remains unclear and further evaluation is ongoing. Hong Kong officials said that dog continues to show no clinical signs of illness, remains under quarantine and is being cared for, and will continue to be monitored and tested.

We will keep you updated you as we learn more. At this time, the CDC, the World Health Organization (WHO), and the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) say there is no evidence that companion animals, including pets, spread COVID-19.

As always, it’s a good idea to wash your hands after being around animals, and animal owners should continue to include pets and other animals in their emergency preparedness planning, including keeping a two-week supply of food and medications on hand.”7

If someone in your household is diagnosed with the virus and you feel additional precautions are necessary, the following is from the CDC:

“Considerations for COVID-19 patients under home care and isolation who have pets or other animals:

People with COVID-19 should be advised to tell their public health point of contact that they have pets or other animals in their home.

In addition to other prevention measures, people with COVID-19 who are identified by public health officials as requiring home care and isolation should be advised to limit interaction with pets and other animals.

Specifically, while these people are symptomatic, they should maintain separation from pets as they would with other household members, and avoid direct contact with pets, including petting, snuggling, being kissed or licked, and sharing food. Service animals should be permitted to remain with their handlers.

If possible, a household member should be designated to care for pets in the home. If the individual in home care and isolation must care for pet(s), including service animals, they should ensure they wash their hands before and after caring for pets and wear a facemask while interacting with pets, until they are medically cleared to return to normal activities.”8

Nature to the Rescue?

The race is on to not only learn more about how COVID-19 affects other species but for biotech companies to produce a slew of pharmaceutical products in response to this latest disease outbreak.

Interestingly, the most accessible and effective treatment may already exist at your local health food store. Dr. Michel Chrétien’s Montreal laboratory is testing quercetin, an all-natural extract from plants, and its derivatives, as a possible “broad spectrum” antiviral medication. Clinical trials began in China a few weeks ago.9

Dr. Mercola has also published important recent articles on this topic, on February 24th: Vitamin C Works for Sepsis. Will It Work for Coronavirus? and on March 9th: Essential Nutrition to Protect Yourself From Coronavirus

FOLLOW Dr. Karen Becker VM, @Healthy Pets at Mercola

TIME TO PAY ATTENTION PEOPLE… NEW DANGERS WITH COVID-19?


SOURCE: MAYO CLINIC

Español

A new study suggests that the novel coronavirus(check out the video) COVID-19 can remain in the air for up to three hours, and live on surfaces such as plastic and stainless steel for up to three days.

Pre-existing conditions among people who are more likely to be affected included

  • diabetes
  • cancer
  • chronic lung disease
  • chronic heart disease
  • chronic kidney disease

Some infected people had mild symptoms (such as cold-like symptoms) or no symptoms at all.

AYUDO A CONTROLAR EL VIRUS COVID-19 LAVANDO MIS MANOS MUCHAS.


Las Manos a Lavar – Gallina Pintadita 3 – Oficial – Canciones infantiles para niños y bebés

Los Centros para el Control y la Prevención de Enfermedades (CDC) están vigilando de cerca un brote de enfermedad respiratoria causada por un nuevo coronavirus que se identificó por primera vez en Wuhan, en la provincia de Hubei, en China. Esta es una situación emergente que está cambiando rápidamente y los CDC continuarán brindando información actualizada a medida que esté disponible. Los CDC trabajan a toda hora para proteger la salud de las personas. Es función de los CDC preocuparse y actuar rápidamente cada vez que haya un problema potencial para la salud pública. Hay información adicional sobre la respuesta de los CDC al  COVID-19 en inglés. Leer Más

  • Las Manos a Lavar (Letra):
  • La, la, la las manos a lavar
  • A lavar La, la, la las manos
  • a lavar A lavar Para tomar un pan Las manitas,
  • a lavar Antes de comer el lunch Las manitas,
  • a lavar Si fuiste al baño, entonces…
  • Las manitas, a lavar Si tocaste algo sucio en suelo Las manitas,
  • a lavar A lavar las manos
  • Chic, chic, chic
  • A lavar las manos
  • Chic, chic, chic
  • La, la, la, la las manos a lavar
  • La, la, la las manos a lavar
  • A lavar La, la, la las manos a lavar
  • A lavar Al llegar de un paseo
  • Si fuiste al baño
  • Si tomaste el autobús
  • Si jugaste en el piso
  • Espuma, espuma y manos a lavar
  • © Bromelia Produções

CARTOON HUMOR: WASH YOUR HANDS… LAVA LAS MANOS`


MUST SEE VIDEO… TiKToK CORONAVIRUS SONG GONE VIRAL lol


 

coronavirus song vietnam health department
VIDEO BELOW STORY

 

Vietnamese Corona virus TikTok songs taking over the internet as a challenge.

Thanks to YouTuber: Nikki Châu Ngọc Trân who translated this into English.

IN HER OWN WORDS, Nikki Châu Ngọc Trân

Hi everyone. I came across the video and liked it so much, I translated the lyrics into English and add as subtitles. The original video is here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BtulL….

My English translation is here. Vietnamese original text is below. I took some tiny creative license with the translation to make the text flow in English, such as “fight coronavirus” instead of “push back coronavirus”.

VIDEO CONTEXT:
Ghen means jealous. Cô Vy appears to be a word play on Covid. Cô means lady. Vy is a common Vietnamese name. The video is portraying the virus as someone who’s trying to come between a couple. At the beginning of the video the couple was fighting and at the end they came together. And yes, the video does perpetuate gender roles. (This song is based on another song the same musicians made: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vk8_0…)

TRANSLATED TEXT:
“‘Ghen Cô Vy’ is creation of the Vietnamese Institute of Occupational and Environmental Health, in collaboration with musicians Khac Hung, Min, and Erik.

Through this project, we aim to empower and strengthen trust in the community, so that we can join hands to combat COVID-19 (aka nCoV-2019).

In this critical moment of fighting the virus, we hope the song will ignite our spirits and reduce stress for the frontline fighters of this war: the team of experts, physicians, health workers and millions of other workers who are in the frontline of exposure and daily struggle with this disease.

Let our community take the initiative in implementing preventive habits as recommended by health experts, and let us spread goodness and kindness to win the disease together.”

CREDITS:
Producer: Institute of Occupational and Environmental Health
Music & Lyrics: Khắc Hưng
Singer: Min x Erik
Visual: Yang Animation Artist

ORIGINAL VIETNAMESE TEXT:
“‘Ghen Cô Vy’ là 1 dự án sáng tạo của Viện Sức khoẻ nghề nghiệp và môi trường, hợp tác với nhạc sĩ Khắc Hưng , ca sĩ Min và ca sĩ Erik.

Qua dự án này, chúng tôi mong muốn được tiếp thêm sức mạnh và niềm tin cho cộng đồng, để chúng ta cùng chung tay chống dịch COVID-19 (hay còn gọi là nCoV-2019).

Trong thời khắc quan trọng chiến đấu với dịch bệnh này, chúng tôi mong ca khúc có thể truyền thêm lửa và bớt chút căng thẳng cho những chiến sĩ tuyến đầu của cuộc chiến này. Đó là đội ngũ chuyên gia, các y bác sĩ, các nhân viên y tế và hàng triệu người lao động, những người ở tiền tuyến vẫn tiếp xúc và đấu tranh hàng ngày với dịch bệnh.

Cộng đồng chúng ta hãy cùng nhau chủ động thực hiện các thói quen phòng bệnh theo khuyến cáo của các cơ quan chuyên môn và lan toả những điều tử tế, tốt đẹp để cùng nhau chiến thắng dịch bệnh.”

“Jealous Coronavirus” music video from Vietnamese Health Dept. w/ English subtitles

https://youtu.be/6Ud_MP3dj7k

 

 

UPDATE: Chinese Doctor Who Issued Early Warning on Coronavirus Dies


REPORTED BY: THE WALL STREET JOURNAL, Chao Deng, Josh Chin 134 mins ago

 

corona virus sars mers emergency teamWUHAN, China—A Chinese doctor who became a folk hero after he was arrested for warning about the dangers of the deadly new virus now spreading around the world died on Friday after becoming infected with it.
Li Wenliang, a 33-year-old ophthalmologist based in Wuhan, the epicenter of the outbreak, had captivated the country and triggered an extraordinary outpouring of emotion as he ailed.

In social-media posts, many Chinese directed their frustration at government officials who many believe didn’t respond quickly enough despite clear evidence of the developing epidemic. Millions of people flocked to a live stream about Dr. Li that was run by local media outside the hospital where he was being treated.

“An all-out effort to save him was unsuccessful,” the hospital said. “We deeply grieve the loss.”

The World Health Organization on Thursday reported 28,285 confirmed cases globally, including more than 3,700 new ones. A total of 565 people have died, it said. Singapore, which has the second-largest number of cases outside China, reported two new infections, including one with no apparent link to China.
Chinese state media reported Thursday night that Dr. Li’s heart had stopped at around 9:30 p.m., and that he was immediately put on life support. The hospital where Dr. Li was being treated later said authorities were still fighting to keep him alive and then announced his death at 2:58 a.m. Friday.
After initial reports of Dr. Li’s death began circulating online late Thursday in China, including from the official social-media accounts of Communist Party publications, he was mourned and celebrated as a symbol of the public’s determination to find answers to still-unanswered questions about how officials first responded to the outbreak.

READ MORE THE WALL STREET JOURNAL

 

Please Help to get some choppers

dentures
CLICK HERE FOR FULL STORY

CORONAVIRUS: WHAT ARE THE DANGERS?


SOURCE: MAYO CLINIC

Español

Where Do Coronaviruses Come From

Coronaviruses are common in many different species of animals, including camels and bats. Rarely, these coronaviruses can evolve and infect humans and then spread between humans. Recent examples of this include SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV.

Most coronaviruses infect animals, but not people. In the future, one or more of these other coronaviruses could potentially evolve and spread to humans, as has happened in the past. We still don’t understand why only certain coronaviruses are able to infect people.

Common human coronaviruses

Common human coronaviruses, including types 229E, NL63, OC43, and HKU1, usually cause mild to moderate upper-respiratory tract illnesses, like the common cold. Most people get infected with these viruses at some point in their lives. These illnesses usually only last for a short amount of time. Symptoms may include

  • runny nose
  • headache
  • cough
  • sore throat
  • fever
  • a general feeling of being unwell

Human coronaviruses can sometimes cause lower-respiratory tract illnesses, such as pneumonia or bronchitis. This is more common in people with cardiopulmonary disease, people with weakened immune systems, infants, and older adults.

Transmission

Human coronaviruses most commonly spread from an infected person to others through

  • the air by coughing and sneezing
  • close personal contact, such as touching or shaking hands
  • touching an object or surface with the virus on it, then touching your mouth, nose, or eyes before washing your hands
  • rarely, fecal contamination

In the United States, people usually get infected with common human coronaviruses in the fall and winter. However, you can get infected at any time of the year. Most people will get infected with one or more of the common human coronaviruses in their lifetime. Young children are most likely to get infected. However, people can have multiple infections in their lifetime.

Other human coronaviruses

Most people confirmed to have MERS-CoV infection have had severe respiratory illness with symptoms of:

  • fever
  • cough
  • shortness of breath

Some people also had diarrhea and nausea/vomiting. For many people with MERS, more severe complications followed, such as pneumonia and kidney failure. About 3 or 4 out of every 10 people reported with MERS have died. Most of the people who died had a pre-existing medical condition that weakened their immune system, or an underlying medical condition that hadn’t yet been discovered. Medical conditions sometimes weaken people’s immune systems and make them more likely to get sick or have severe illness.

Pre-existing conditions among people who got MERS have included

  • diabetes
  • cancer
  • chronic lung disease
  • chronic heart disease
  • chronic kidney disease

Some infected people had mild symptoms (such as cold-like symptoms) or no symptoms at all.

The symptoms of MERS start to appear about 5 or 6 days after a person is exposed, but can range from 2 to 14 days.

The coronavirus that originated in Wuhan, China, raised global concerns but, after a two day meeting, the World Health Organization has issued a statement saying the situation is not yet an emergency of international concern.

Meanwhile, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is monitoring the situation and will provide updated information as it becomes available.
In addition, Mayo Clinic continues to closely monitor the coronavirus outbreak and says staff is trained and prepared to care for patients, should the need arise.
Dr. Pritish Tosh, a Mayo Clinic infectious diseases specialist, says health care providers need to ask patients with respiratory illness and fever about their recent travel.
“It’s important we focus on patients with fever and respiratory symptoms, not just for the novel coronavirus, but also for other respiratory viruses that are circulating, such as influenza,” says Dr. Tosh. “Once these patients are identified, they should be given a mask to wear and put into a room where a health care provider can ask them about recent travel.”
Dr. Tosh adds, “They may have been to a part of the Middle East where there is ongoing MERS (Middle East respiratory syndrome) infections. They may also have been in Wuhan, China, or been close to someone who has been there.”
The coronavirus is in the same family of viruses as SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome) and MERS.