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TIME TO PAY ATTENTION PEOPLE… NEW DANGERS WITH COVID-19?


SOURCE: MAYO CLINIC

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A new study suggests that the novel coronavirus(check out the video) COVID-19 can remain in the air for up to three hours, and live on surfaces such as plastic and stainless steel for up to three days.

Pre-existing conditions among people who are more likely to be affected included

  • diabetes
  • cancer
  • chronic lung disease
  • chronic heart disease
  • chronic kidney disease

Some infected people had mild symptoms (such as cold-like symptoms) or no symptoms at all.

CORONAVIRUS: WHAT ARE THE DANGERS?


SOURCE: MAYO CLINIC

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Where Do Coronaviruses Come From

Coronaviruses are common in many different species of animals, including camels and bats. Rarely, these coronaviruses can evolve and infect humans and then spread between humans. Recent examples of this include SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV.

Most coronaviruses infect animals, but not people. In the future, one or more of these other coronaviruses could potentially evolve and spread to humans, as has happened in the past. We still don’t understand why only certain coronaviruses are able to infect people.

Common human coronaviruses

Common human coronaviruses, including types 229E, NL63, OC43, and HKU1, usually cause mild to moderate upper-respiratory tract illnesses, like the common cold. Most people get infected with these viruses at some point in their lives. These illnesses usually only last for a short amount of time. Symptoms may include

  • runny nose
  • headache
  • cough
  • sore throat
  • fever
  • a general feeling of being unwell

Human coronaviruses can sometimes cause lower-respiratory tract illnesses, such as pneumonia or bronchitis. This is more common in people with cardiopulmonary disease, people with weakened immune systems, infants, and older adults.

Transmission

Human coronaviruses most commonly spread from an infected person to others through

  • the air by coughing and sneezing
  • close personal contact, such as touching or shaking hands
  • touching an object or surface with the virus on it, then touching your mouth, nose, or eyes before washing your hands
  • rarely, fecal contamination

In the United States, people usually get infected with common human coronaviruses in the fall and winter. However, you can get infected at any time of the year. Most people will get infected with one or more of the common human coronaviruses in their lifetime. Young children are most likely to get infected. However, people can have multiple infections in their lifetime.

Other human coronaviruses

Most people confirmed to have MERS-CoV infection have had severe respiratory illness with symptoms of:

  • fever
  • cough
  • shortness of breath

Some people also had diarrhea and nausea/vomiting. For many people with MERS, more severe complications followed, such as pneumonia and kidney failure. About 3 or 4 out of every 10 people reported with MERS have died. Most of the people who died had a pre-existing medical condition that weakened their immune system, or an underlying medical condition that hadn’t yet been discovered. Medical conditions sometimes weaken people’s immune systems and make them more likely to get sick or have severe illness.

Pre-existing conditions among people who got MERS have included

  • diabetes
  • cancer
  • chronic lung disease
  • chronic heart disease
  • chronic kidney disease

Some infected people had mild symptoms (such as cold-like symptoms) or no symptoms at all.

The symptoms of MERS start to appear about 5 or 6 days after a person is exposed, but can range from 2 to 14 days.

The coronavirus that originated in Wuhan, China, raised global concerns but, after a two day meeting, the World Health Organization has issued a statement saying the situation is not yet an emergency of international concern.

Meanwhile, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is monitoring the situation and will provide updated information as it becomes available.
In addition, Mayo Clinic continues to closely monitor the coronavirus outbreak and says staff is trained and prepared to care for patients, should the need arise.
Dr. Pritish Tosh, a Mayo Clinic infectious diseases specialist, says health care providers need to ask patients with respiratory illness and fever about their recent travel.
“It’s important we focus on patients with fever and respiratory symptoms, not just for the novel coronavirus, but also for other respiratory viruses that are circulating, such as influenza,” says Dr. Tosh. “Once these patients are identified, they should be given a mask to wear and put into a room where a health care provider can ask them about recent travel.”
Dr. Tosh adds, “They may have been to a part of the Middle East where there is ongoing MERS (Middle East respiratory syndrome) infections. They may also have been in Wuhan, China, or been close to someone who has been there.”
The coronavirus is in the same family of viruses as SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome) and MERS.

Key Facts about Use of E-Cigarette, or Vaping, Products


Key Facts about Use of E-Cigarette, or Vaping, Products

  • Electronic cigarettes—or e-cigarettes—are also called vapes, e-hookahs, vape pens, tank systems, mods, and electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS).
  • Using an e-cigarette is commonly called vaping.
  • E-cigarettes work by heating a liquid to produce an aerosol that users inhale into their lungs.
  • The liquid can contain: nicotine, tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabinoid (CBD) oils, and other substances, flavorings, and additives. THC is the psychoactive mind-altering compound of marijuana that produces the “high.”

Some of these products contain antifreeze / engine coolant. These products are harmful and can cause death if used improperly. Prolonged exposure or high concentrations of vapor or mist may cause mild irritation of the respiratory respiratory and headache, dizziness, nausea, vomiting, drowsiness, disturbances of the central nervous system, involuntary eye irritation. If swallowed may cause death if not given emergency services.

DANGEROUS: Key Facts about Vitamin E Acetate


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Key Facts about Vitamin E Acetate

  • Vitamin E acetate is used as an additive, most notably as a thickening agent in THC-containing e-cigarette, or vaping, products.
  • Vitamin E is a vitamin found in many foods, including vegetable oils, cereals, meat, fruits, and vegetables. It is also available as a dietary supplement and in many cosmetic products, like skin creams.
  • Vitamin E acetate usually does not cause harm when ingested as a vitamin supplement or applied to the skin. However, previous research suggests that when vitamin E acetate is inhaled, it may interfere with normal lung functioning.
Any of these products pictured here may contain dangerous substances that can kill you!!!

Latest Outbreak Information From The CDC:

  • This complex investigation spans all states, involves over 2,500 patients, and a wide variety of brands and substances and e-cigarette, or vaping, products.
  • As of December 3, 2019, CDC is only reporting hospitalized EVALI cases and EVALI deaths regardless of hospitalization status. CDC has removed non-hospitalized cases from previously reported case counts. See Public Health Reporting for more information.
  • As of December 17, 2019, a total of 2,506 cases of hospitalized e-cigarette, or vaping, product use-associated lung injury (EVALI) have been reported to CDC from 50 states, the District of Columbia, and two U.S. territories (Puerto Rico and U.S. Virgin Islands).
  • Fifty-four deaths have been confirmed in 27 states and the District of Columbia (as of December 17, 2019): Alabama, California, Connecticut, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, New Jersey, New York, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, and Virginia
  • The median age of deceased patients was 52 years and ranged from 17 through 75 years (as of December 17, 2019).
  • More deaths are currently under investigation.
  • Data suggest the outbreak peaked in September 2019. However, states continue to report new cases, including deaths, to CDC on a weekly basis.
  • Among cases of hospitalized EVALI patients reported to CDC with available data (as of December 3, 2019): 67% were male (among 2,155 patients with data on sex)
  • 78% were under 35 years old, with a median age of 24 years and age range from 13 to 77 years (among 2,159 patients with data on age)
  • By age group category: 16% of patients were under 18 years old;
  • 38% of patients were 18 to 24 years old;
  • 24% of patients were 25 to 34 years old; and
  • 23% of patients were 35 years or older.
  • 1,782 hospitalized patients had complete information* on substances used in e-cigarette, or vaping, products in the 3 months prior to symptom onset, of whom (as of December 3, 2019): 80% reported using THC-containing products; 35% reported exclusive use of THC-containing products.
  • 54% reported using nicotine-containing products; 13% reported exclusive use of nicotine-containing products.
  • 12% reported using cannabidiol (CBD)-containing products; 1% reported exclusive use of cannabidiol (CBD)-containing products.
  • 40% reported both THC- and nicotine-containing product use.
  • 5% reported no THC-, nicotine-, or CBD-containing product use.
  • Among hospitalized EVALI patients who reported using THC-containing e-cigarette, or vaping product brands: The most commonly reported product brand included Dank vapes (56%), followed by TKO (15%), Smart Cart (13%), and Rove (12%). However, regional differences in THC-containing product use were noted.