Tag Archives: dogs

Banana Peanut Butter Oatmeal cookies


Just what my doggies ordered. They love these cookies. It’s healthy and nutritious.

Banana, Peanut Butter Oatmeal cookies

INGREDIENTS

2 cups Oatmeal (soaked)

1/2” inch Water cover above oats

1 cup Banana

1/2 cup Peanut butter

2 cups All Purpose Flour

1 Tablespoon Olive oil

DIRECTIONS

Place 2 cups oatmeal in container and cover 1/2 inch water over the top. Leave that set until almost all the water has been absorbed. About 1.5 hour

2 cups Oatmeal
1/2” inch water to cover oatmeal
1/2 “ inch water over oatmeal soaking 1 to 1.5 hours

Heat oven to 350’ degree F. Grease 1” x 15”x 21” cookie sheet with the olive oil

Frozen bananas to peel
Peel banana’s
Golden banana’s from my trees

Place the banana, peanut butter and oatmeal.

Stir / Cream the ingredients together. Make sure all the bananas are mixed in good. You might want to mix the bananas prior to adding to the mix.

After getting those ingredients mixed time to add the flour.

Place the dough onto the cookie sheet and smooth out to thin layer.

Place in oven on center rack for 30 minutes. take out of oven. The sides should be pulled away from pan. Get the pizza cutter and cut your squares. Turn oven off and put the pan back into the oven and let bake until cool. You can make the size of the cookie fit your dog. I have 4 dogs in various sizes. From 85 to 15 pounds. So my cookies are various sizes.

After 30 minutes remove from the oven

Cut your squares and put them back into the oven until completely cool.

Remove from oven after completely cool. Put into an airtight container and refrigerator. I have 4 dogs and this last 3 weeks. You can also freeze them and just take out what you need.

Your dogs will love them until the last cookie…

You can adjust this recipe to your dogs taste or yours. I ate one and i couldn’t taste the peanut butter. I did a second recipe with 1 1/2 cups of peanut butter. I can taste the peanut butter and my dogs could really smell their treats baking and waited by the kitchen door.

Enjoy !!!

Fresh Hamburger Meat


Fresh chopped hamburger meat from your own kitchen doesn’t get any better. You choose your choice of meat and start chopping.

Most hamburger meat is a combination of several cows. So if one of them has an infection the whole bunch that was just made is infected. This way you know this is one cow.

London broil, top sirloin or chuck roast. Your choice. Just remember to have some fat on the piece of meat. Flavonoids are in the rendered fat. Yummy

I like to cut mine up into very small chunks. I leave my meat semi thawed, it’s easier to cut.

You can also use this for your dogs. If you can afford a Little treat every now and then. Don’t cook it. Leave it raw and mix with some slightly cooked veggies.

DO NOT DUMP YOUR PETS. EDUCATE and KEEP THEM SAFE WITH YOU…


Get The Answers You Need About Your Pets and COVID-19 With Dr. Karen Becker

It’s important to keep in mind that at the present time this is an ever-evolving situation rife with competing theories and conspiracies, widespread mis- and disinformation, politics, etc. My goal today is to update you about what we know at this point regarding COVID-19 and furry family members.

Animals and COVID-19

According to veterinary publication dvm360, there are reports of animals being abandoned or killed because their owners fear they might harbor COVID-19.1 This is an absolutely unnecessary and tragic situation.

While it’s clear we’re still learning about this virus, at this time the WHO website maintains this particular type of coronavirus can be transmitted from human to human. From the OIE World Organisation for Animal Health Questions and Answers on the 2019 Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19) webpage:2

“Are animals responsible for COVID-19 in people?

The predominant route of transmission of COVID-19 appears to be from human to human.

Current evidence suggests that the COVID-19 virus has an animal source. Ongoing investigations are important for identifying the animal source (including species involved) and establishing the potential role of an animal reservoir in this disease. Yet, to date, there is not enough scientific evidence to identify that source or to explain the route of transmission from an animal source to humans.

Genetic sequence data reveals that the COVID-19 virus is a close relative of other CoV found circulating in Rhinolophus bat (Horseshoe Bat) populations. There is the possibility that transmission to humans involved an intermediate host.

Priorities for research to investigate the animal source were discussed by the OIE informal advisory group on COVID-19 and were presented at the WHO Global Research and Innovation Forum (11-12 February 2020) by the President of the OIE Wildlife Working Group. The outcomes from the discussion of the OIE informal advisory group on COVID-19 can be found at the link.”

Pets, COVID-19, and Confirmed Infection in One Dog in Hong Kong

Also from the OIE World Organisation for Animal Health Questions and Answers on the 2019 Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19) webpage:3

“What do we know about COVID-19 virus and companion animals?

The current spread of COVID-19 is a result of human to human transmission. To date, there is no evidence that companion animals can spread the disease. Therefore, there is no justification in taking measures against companion animals which may compromise their welfare.

The Veterinary Services of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the People’s Republic of China reported to OIE evidence that a dog had tested positive to the COVID-19 virus following close exposure to its owners who were sick with COVID-19 – see Immediate Notification (03/01/2020) and Follow-up report no.1 (03/08/2020).

The test, conducted by real time PCR, showed the presence of genetic material from the COVID-19 virus. The dog [a 17-year-old Pomeranian] was not showing any clinical signs of the disease.

There is no evidence that dogs play a role in the spread of this human disease or that they become sick. Further studies are needed to understand if and how different animals could be affected by COVID-19 virus. The OIE will continue to provide updates as new information becomes available.

There is no evidence to support restrictions to movement or trade of companion animals.”

According to a post on March 9th in PetfoodIndustry.com:

“Veterinarians confirmed that the coronavirus had infected the dog too after taking nasal, oral and rectal swabs, along with fecal samples. The World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) published a report of the emerging disease, listing this case as the first known in dogs.

Nasal and oral samples tested positive for the presence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the name of virus responsible for COVID-19. However, the dog hasn’t shown any outward signs of illness. Follow-up oral and nasal samples taken on March 2 and 5 continues to test positive.

Doctors and veterinarians don’t know if the COVID-19 virus has the potential to be zoonotic, or transmitted from dogs to people.

Doctors don’t know if the dog got the virus directly from its owner, or through an intermediary species. Likewise, doctors don’t know how the virus was transmitted to the dog, whether by airborne particles, direct contact or bodily fluids.

In Hong Kong, health authorities quarantine mammalian pets from households with confirmed human cases of COVID-19 and place the animals under veterinary surveillance for 14 days, according to the report.”4

Why Pet Parents Should NOT Hit the Panic Button

Many veterinarians have called for calm after the announcement, reminding owners this doesn’t mean dogs can get sick from the virus or transmit it back to humans. Panic makes people do foolish, regrettable things, which is what has occurred in Wuhan. From a March 4th post in the Whole Dog Journal:

“Tragically, within days [of the report of the single infected dog], there were reports of a record number of dogs and other pets being abandoned in China’s streets, and thousands of pets being surrendered to overwhelmed animal shelters — despite the fact that there is no indication that the COVID-19 virus is zoonotic.

Time magazine reports that the crisis for pet dogs and cats is the worst in Wuhan, the capital city of the Hubei province where the first cases of COVID-19 are believed to have emerged. Time reports that when a person in Wuhan is found to have COVID-19, the authorities kill all animals in the home as a precaution.

This report was corroborated by a reporter for the BBC (British news service):

‘Volunteers in China say they’re struggling to keep up with the number of animals being abandoned as the country battles the virus outbreak. More than 2,000 people in China have died and more than 78,000 infections have been reported in the country.

Pet owners who fall sick or are caught up in quarantine can’t take their animals with them, and despite reassurance from the World Health Organization that animals can’t carry the virus, others are being dumped.’”5

The Centers for Disease Control is now advising people with COVID-19 to avoid close contact with their pets, but on February 28th, Dr. Jonathan Ball at the University of Nottingham has called the widespread panic about the news “incredibly irresponsible”:

“There is no evidence that the human novel coronavirus can infect dogs and it would be incredible for a virus to make so many species jumps in such a short space of time!

We have to differentiate between real infection and just detecting the presence of a virus – these are very different – and the fact that the test result was weakly positive would suggest that this is environmental contamination or simply the presence of coronavirus shed from the human contact that has ended up in the dog’s samples.

In truth this is incredibly irresponsible because the last thing we need to do is create mass hysteria about the possibility of dogs being infected, and therefore potentially transmitting this virus when there is absolutely no evidence for this whatsoever.”6

If You’re a Pet Parent, Do This Instead

From the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) COVID-19 website:

“The precise meaning of the positive test result from the one dog remains unclear and further evaluation is ongoing. Hong Kong officials said that dog continues to show no clinical signs of illness, remains under quarantine and is being cared for, and will continue to be monitored and tested.

We will keep you updated you as we learn more. At this time, the CDC, the World Health Organization (WHO), and the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) say there is no evidence that companion animals, including pets, spread COVID-19.

As always, it’s a good idea to wash your hands after being around animals, and animal owners should continue to include pets and other animals in their emergency preparedness planning, including keeping a two-week supply of food and medications on hand.”7

If someone in your household is diagnosed with the virus and you feel additional precautions are necessary, the following is from the CDC:

“Considerations for COVID-19 patients under home care and isolation who have pets or other animals:

People with COVID-19 should be advised to tell their public health point of contact that they have pets or other animals in their home.

In addition to other prevention measures, people with COVID-19 who are identified by public health officials as requiring home care and isolation should be advised to limit interaction with pets and other animals.

Specifically, while these people are symptomatic, they should maintain separation from pets as they would with other household members, and avoid direct contact with pets, including petting, snuggling, being kissed or licked, and sharing food. Service animals should be permitted to remain with their handlers.

If possible, a household member should be designated to care for pets in the home. If the individual in home care and isolation must care for pet(s), including service animals, they should ensure they wash their hands before and after caring for pets and wear a facemask while interacting with pets, until they are medically cleared to return to normal activities.”8

Nature to the Rescue?

The race is on to not only learn more about how COVID-19 affects other species but for biotech companies to produce a slew of pharmaceutical products in response to this latest disease outbreak.

Interestingly, the most accessible and effective treatment may already exist at your local health food store. Dr. Michel Chrétien’s Montreal laboratory is testing quercetin, an all-natural extract from plants, and its derivatives, as a possible “broad spectrum” antiviral medication. Clinical trials began in China a few weeks ago.9

Dr. Mercola has also published important recent articles on this topic, on February 24th: Vitamin C Works for Sepsis. Will It Work for Coronavirus? and on March 9th: Essential Nutrition to Protect Yourself From Coronavirus

FOLLOW Dr. Karen Becker VM, @Healthy Pets at Mercola

Is Sparky Still Perky?


As the BIG BOOM for “natural dog foods” roll out of the factories, what are the true nutrional values? Not all are as healthy as they claim. Food dyes that are dangerous for humans are coloring your pets food. The regulations are very bleak for pet foods. There is no requirement that pet food products have pre-market approval by the FDA. https://www.fda.gov/animal-veterinary/animal-food-feeds/pet-food

As you can see from the recall list several have been recalled for various facts over the past year. Make sure you do a check once in awhile on your pets food. Or sign up for the FDA Recall Notice by email. https://www.fda.gov/animal-veterinary/safety-health/recalls-withdrawals

If you don’t know yet that you should be reading the labels on your dog food as well as your food, this is your wake up call. Did you know that awesome colored dog food that is apealing to you could be very dangerous to your pet. The dyes I have listed can have an adverse reactions on your dogs health.

Its not only the pretty colored kibble. Canned dog foods and treats are also included.

We all know that humans need to avoid Red #3 and that it has been linked to cancer. As a result of efforts begun in the 1970s, in 1990 the U.S. FDA had instituted a partial ban on erythrosine, citing research that high doses have been found to cause cancer in rats. A 1990 study concluded that “chronic erythrosine ingestion may promote thyroid tumor formation in rats via chronic stimulation of the thyroid. In June 2008, the Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI) petitioned the FDA for a complete ban on erythrosine in the United States, but the FDA has not taken any further action.

That is just one of the dangerous dyes for all your pets.

Check out these other dangerous dyes. We need to pay close attention to the labels.

Red #40: Allura Red AC is a red azo dye that goes by several names, including FD&C Red 40. The study found “a possible link between the consumption of these artificial colours and a sodium benzoate preservative and increased hyperactivity”.

Yellow #5 & #6: Tartrazine appears to cause the most allergic and intolerance reactions of all the azo dyes. It also has been known to cause food intolerances. Tartrazine has been used in 3D Printing as a biocompatible photoblocker for generating transparent hydrogels with complex inner structures.

I hope this information provides you with the power of knowledge on these dangerous food dyes in pet foods. Eliminate the colored food from your pets diet and go with the plain colored food.

Just remember… It’s up to us for the care and health of our family pets.

TARGET MASSAGE


TARGET MASSAGE

Not only will your pet love the comforting feeling, but the benefits are endless.

nirvana-massage

Canine Acupressure Techniques to Promote Healing.

Maintaining a well-rounded training regime and providing incremental warm-up exercise before strenuous exercise are an important part of preventing injuries. But with any sport, the dog’s enthusiasm and natural drive can lead to incidental and repetitive injuries, despite our best prevention efforts. That’s why it’s best to formulate an approach to dealing with our dog’s injuries, before they happen.

With an injury that is severe and/or debilitating, a holistic veterinarian should be consulted immediately to diagnose the extent of the damage and prescribe treatment. Soft tissue injuries in particular can be deceiving, so have a veterinarian check your dog to be sure that no other issues or further tissue damage occurs. After the holistic vet has seen your dog and made the necessary recommendations or if the injury is a simple bruise or superficial abrasion, you can help expedite the healing process. Only the animal’s body can heal itself – but you can play a role in helping to create the physical “environment” in which healing can take place in a balanced, healthy manner.

 

dog-pressure-points-paws

Healing with acupressure

Acupressure, like acupuncture, is based on traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) concepts that have helped heal animals and humans alike for more than 3,000 years. The basic principle underlying the healing process is that vital substances of the body nourish the body while moving harmoniously throughout the body. Two of the vital substances are chi (or qi), which is life-promoting energy, and blood, a nutrient-rich body fluid. In TCM, blood includes both the blood as identified in conventional medicine and other body fluids, such as synovial fluids in the joints or the nutrient-rich fluid within the spinal column.

Any injury can cause disruption in the flow of chi and blood. Using acupressure points, also called acupoints, you can help reestablish the flow of chi and blood through an injured area thus creating the healing environment. The movement of chi and blood through the damaged tissue helps distribute the nutrients the body needs to heal quickly and well.

 reiki-pet

Surrounding the Dragon

“Surrounding the Dragon” is an acupoint selection technique that is specifically for enhancing the flow of chi and blood to and through a particular location on the body. This technique is used often as an effective tool for tendon and ligament joint injuries as well as for chronic issues such as arthritis and tendonitis.The “Dragon” is the painful, raging injury, arthritic joint, or site of scar tissue formation, which blocks the flow of chi and blood. Applying gentle pressure to specific acupoints surrounding the “offended” area stimulates the flow of the healing chi and blood while removing toxins and nourishing the tissues.everybody-loves-a-massageWhen Surrounding the Dragon, we stimulate acupoints located near – but not too close to – the insulted area because you do not want to “spank the crying baby.” This phrase is used in Chinese medicine to mean that you do not want to cause any further hurt when the area is already painful.  READ MORE

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