Tag Archives: survival disaster

My Heart Goes Out To Turkey and Syria


#Turkey, #Syria

ERUPTION UPDATE


This is a Civil Defense message.

This is an Eruption update for Tuesday, November 29th at 10 in the morning.

USGS – Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reports the leading edge of the lava flow on Mauna Loa’s northeast flank remains at a high elevation of over 9,000 feet and more than 5 miles from Saddle Road.  

As stated, the northeast flank of Mauna Loa is not populated and lava continues to not pose a threat to any communities or infrastructure, at this time.

Due to no threat to communities at this time, shelters that were opened yesterday at Old Kona Airport in Kailua-Kona and Ka`u Gymnasium in Pahala as a precaution, will be closed at noon today.

For those traveling Saddle Road /Daniel K. Inouye Highway, parking along the highway is unsafe and prohibited.  Hawaii Police Department report that vehicles that park along Saddle Road /Daniel K. Inouye Highway between the 16 and 31 Mile Markers will be subject to citation and will be towed. 

You will be informed of any changes that affect your safety. 

This is your Hawaii County Civil Defense Agency.Confirm Receipt© 2022 Everbridge, Inc.

lava Eruption: Filter for doorways and windows.


Measure you doorways and windows that you want to leave open to get fresh air.

Go to your hardware store and pick up HVAC Filters. They have various sizes. I used 20 x 25 on the doors and 16x 20 for the windows. You need 2 pieces of wood 1“x 2” x 8 feet per door. Windows I just used the duct tape

Tools you’ll need. Duct tape, scissors, utility knife, tape measure, filters.

Doorway: Cut your wood to the correct size. Lay the wood down and stick the filters in between the 2 pieces of wood. Measure both sides so it is even or your pañal will be crooked. Tape each side length wise first and flip it over and tape. Then tape each individual panel and go around the wood.

You won’t need wood for the windows. Just tape the panels together after measuring.

THE HEALTH HAZARDS OF VOLCANIC ASH (part 6 Precautions for Children)


THE HEALTH HAZARDS OF VOLCANIC ASH (part 6 Precautions for Children)

https://orgnatlife.com/2018/05/30/the-health-hazards-of-volcanic-ash-part-6-precautions-for-children/
— Read on orgnatlife.com/2018/05/30/the-health-hazards-of-volcanic-ash-part-6-precautions-for-children/

WARNING: VOLCANO ERUPTION CDC USGS HVO


This is a Civil Defense Message.

This is an Eruption message for Monday, November 28th at 12:30 AM.

USGS – Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reports an eruption at the summit of Mauna Loa is occurring.

USGS – Hawaiian Volcano Observatory and Civil Defense are activated and monitoring the situation.

The eruption is confined to the summit of Mauna Loa and there are no lava flow threats to communities and there is no evacuation requested at this time.

You will be informed of any changes that affect your safety. 

This is your Hawaii County Civil Defense Agency.Confirm Receipt© 2022 Everbridge, Inc.

Protecting your Skin … Cleansing your pores…Fire… Smoke and Ash Fallout. What to Do.


BY: ORGNAT LIFE

MOST IMPORTANTLY: KEEP YOUR FACE, HANDS and EYES COVERED.

Always wash your hands and change clothes as soon as you get home.

Try and keep the contamination to one area.

If you are one of the few that come home to one of the burnt out neighborhoods make sure you exercise caution while out in the elements.

That means anytime you are outside make sure you follow these simple emergency instructions to cleansing your body.

  • You do not want to inhale any of the elements that is on fire or has been burnt out.
  • Respiratory infections and many other illness can be blamed on large burn out fires as these.
  • Think about how many toxic products that are in our homes. Make sure if moving one of these items you are prepared with emergency protection gear.
  • Refrigerator, microwaves, cars, carpet, wood flooring that has been treated and those are just a few things that every home may have.

Your home and residing in the neighborhood: Set up an area that you can seal off. If you have a separate hall way that you can close off with plastic or a separate entry, perhaps through the side garage door(not a big one)with door to house. Handy to change contaminated clothes.

Even though your area may not have flames crawling up your street or that you can actually see, remember embers and ash can float through the air. It will glide until it gets caught on a branch or something to cling onto.

Make sure you bath each night before you go to bed.

Open your pores with warm water and use a good scrubby or washcloth with loads of soap. Soap up really good. Use cold water after to wash the soap off and close your pores.

Keep all of your smoke clothes in a plastic bag in your sealed area until you wash them. You don’t want to spread the smell or contaminate any other area.

If you are in close vicinity of the devastated areas: Do Not run any fans or air conditioning that has a connetion to outdoors. Close all doors, windows and vents. Close blinds and curtains to keep sun out and temperatures down in the house.

Global Warming? Inevitable Melt Down? The Race For Space.


By Orgnatlife.com   June 1, 2019

Are the rich running away from the earth? It seems Global Warming Is Inevitable No Matter What We Do, it’s just not working.

Experts claim rising of the earth’s temperature due to the increasing concentration of greenhouse gases. It is a result of human activities which include burning of fossil fuels and clearing forests for various purposes. All the plastic that we have feed into the oceans and landfills. All the pollution created by humans. We have fed our world nothing but garbage, Literally…

India’s Heatwave is melting the roadways.

Some scientists claim that the earth’s core is heating up and possible implosion could happen. Is the earth going to melt or swallow its self?

There are sink holes opening around the world. The largest sinkhole in the world is the Qattara Depression near Cairo, Egypt. The sinkhole, which is filled with sludge and quicksand, measures almost 50 miles (80 kilometers) long and 74 miles (120 kilometers) wide. Florida’s sinkholes have swallowed cars to humans.

There are many large sink holes in the USA. More are appearing every day.

Countries around the world are being flooded out. People homes are destroyed and they are homeless. USA floods have taken many homes and has left hundreds of thousands homeless.

The Pacific ring of fire, earthquakes, tornados, hurricanes, cyclones, wild fires, flooding, sand tornados. Entire towns are being wiped off the map.The entire world is being devastated. So is this related to the great race for space. Are those conspiracies reality for today and our future. Something to ponder on. Controlling the weather.

So as you will see there is a race to get you into space. That’s If you have the money of course. The cost of a private flight into space starts at a mere $200,000.00 up to $175 million. So pack your sunscreen your going to the moon….

2019 has got a whole list of exciting missions and launches.

There are so many exciting space events scheduled for 2019. From manned launches to scientific missions and the private sector of the space industry.


January
January 1 NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft arrives at the distant Solar System object Ultima Thule.
January 3, China makes history by the landing of its Chang’e 4 rover on the far side of the Moon.

February
NASA’s InSight lander continues drilling into the surface of Mars. Collecting samples of the Red Planet.
NASA’s Juno spacecraft performed a close flyby of Jupiter on February 12,
February 21 SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket was launched to take a lunar lander built by Israeli company SpaceIL to the Moon.


March
March 2 SpaceX has launched its crewed Dragon 2 spacecraft on its first test. This was an un-manned flight.
April
April 4 NASA’s Parker Solar Probe will make its next close approach to the Sun
April 11 SpaceX launched its second Falcon Heavy rocket, the launch of the Arabsat-6A spacecraft for Saudi Arabia.
May
May 23 SpaceX will use a Falcon 9 rocket to launch a batch of satellites for the company’s Starlink broadband.
May 27 A Russian Soyuz rocket will launch the Glonass M navigation satellite.
May 29 Russian cosmonauts Oleg Kononenko and Alexey Ovchinin will take a spacewalk outside the International Space Station
May 30 Russian Proton rocket will launch the Yamal 601 communications satellite for Gazprom Space Systems.


June
In June, we are expecting to see the first crewed launch of SpaceX’s Dragon 2 vehicle
June 3 The SpaceX Dragon CRS-17 cargo spacecraft will undock from the International Space Station.
June 5 China will attempt its first rocket launch from the sea
June 11 SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the Canadian Space Agency’s Radarsat Constellation Mission.
June 12 Ascent Abort-2: NASA will conduct a test of the Orion spacecraft’s Launch Abort System
June 20: An Ariane 5 rocket provided by Arianespace will launch the DirecTV 16 and Eutelsat 7C communications satellites.
June 20 Elon Musk says that SpaceX will perform a test flight of its Starship vehicle, intended to one day take humans to Mars.
June 21 Russian Proton rocket will launch the Spektr-RG X-ray observatory.
June 22 A SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket will launch the U.S. Air Force’s Space Test Program-2 mission.
June 24 Three Expedition 59 crewmembers will return to Earth after spending more than 6 months at the International Space Station.
June 27 A United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket will launch the fifth Advanced Extremely High Frequency (AEHF) satellite for the U.S. military.
Also scheduled to launch in June (from Spaceflight Now):
Rocket Lab will launch multiple small satellites into orbit on a rideshare mission arranged by Spaceflight. The mission, titled “Make It Rain,” will launch on an Electron rocket.
A Russian Rockot rocket will launch three Gonets M communications satellites from the Plesetsk Cosmodrome in Russia.
A Russian Soyuz rocket will launch the Russian Arktika-M 1 weather and communications satellite from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan.oth on their third spaceflight.
July
July 5 Russian Soyuz rocket will launch with the Meteor M2-2 polar-orbiting weather satellite and 40 small satellites.
July 9 India will launch the Chandrayaan-2 mission to the moon.
July 8 SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the Dragon cargo spacecraft (CRS-18) on a mission to the International Space Station.
July 16 Russian Proton rocket will launch the Blagovest No. 14L communications.
July 20 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing.
July 20 Three new Expedition 60 crewmembers will launch to the International Space Station in the Soyuz MS-13 spacecraft:
July 24 Arianespace will use an Ariane 5 ECA rocket to launch the Intelsat 39 communications satellite for SSL and the EDRS-C communications satellite for OHB System AG.
July 25 Crew Dragon Demo 2: SpaceX’s Crew Dragon spacecraft is scheduled to take its first manned test flight to the International Space Station.
July 25 United Launch Alliance Delta 4 rocket will launch the second GPS 3 satellite for the U.S. Air Force’s Global Positioning System.
July 31 Russia will launch a Progress cargo spacecraft on a mission to deliver cargo to the International Space Station.
Also scheduled to launch in July (from Spaceflight Now):
SpaceX will use a Falcon 9 rocket to launch the Amos 17 communications
Japan will launch the HTV-8 cargo resupply mission to the International Space Station
China will launch the Shijian 20 communications satellite
Arianespace will use a Vega rocket to launch the Falcon Eye 1 Earth-imaging satellite for the United Arab Emirates.


August
Aug. 1 Virgin Orbit’s LauncherOne rocket will launch 14 cubesats for NASA and other educational institutions for the ELaNa-20 rideshare mission.
Aug. Virgin Orbit’s LauncherOne rocket will launch 14 cubesats for NASA and other educational institutions for the ELaNa-20 rideshare mission.
Possible first contracted crew flight of SpaceX’s Dragon 2 in August, providing the test flight sticks to schedule. USCV-1 to the International Space Station (ISS).
Boeing will conduct an uncrewed test flight of its CST-100 Starliner vehicle at some point in August with plans for a first crewed test Flight.
September
Sept. 2 Arianespace Vega rocket will launch on the Small Spacecraft Mission Service (SSMS) proof-of-concept mission with multiple small satellites.
Sept. 25 Three new Expedition 61 crewmembers will launch to the International Space Station in the Soyuz MS-15 spacecraft.
Also scheduled to launch in September (from Spaceflight Now):
Japan will launch the HTV-8 cargo resupply mission to the International Space Station.
NASA’s OSIRIS-Rex spacecraft will swoop down to the surface of the asteroid Bennu in September and try to collect a sample.
October
Oct. 3 NASA astronaut Nick Hague, Russian cosmonaut Alexey Ovchinin and Hazzaa Ali Almansoori of the United Arab Emirates will return to Earth from the International Space Station.
Oct. 15 Arianespace Soyuz rocket will launch the first COSMO-SkyMed Second Generation (CSG 1) radar surveillance satellite for the Italian space agency. Flying as a secondary payload is the European Space Agency’s Characterizing Exoplanet Satellite (CHEOPS.
Oct. 19 Northrop Grumman will launch the Cygnus NG-12 cargo mission to the International Space Station.
Also scheduled to launch in October (from Spaceflight Now):
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the third GPS 3 satellite for the U.S. Air Force’s Global Positioning System.
A new planet-hunting mission from ESA will launch between October 15 and November 14. It’s called CHEOPS (Characterising Exoplanets Satellite), and it’ll look for planets orbiting bright stars close to our Solar System.


November
Also scheduled to launch in November (from Spaceflight Now):
Boeing’s CST-100 Starliner will launch on its first crewed test flight to the International Space Station.
An Arianespace Vega rocket will launch the United Arab Emirates’ Falcon Eye 2 Earth observation satellite.
December
Boeing’s CST-100 Starliner will launch on its first crewed test flight to the International Space Station.

Richard Branson’s Virgin Orbit company plans to send its first rocket to space sometime in 2019.

2018 Launches
March 1 GOES-S on an Atlas 5-541 rocket from Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station
March 20 TESS on a Falcon 9 rocket from Space Launch Complex 40
May 5 InSight on an Atlas 5-401 rocket from Space Launch Complex 3-East.
July 31 Parker Solar Probe on a Delta 4-Heavy rocket from Space Launch Complex
Sept. 12 ICESat 2 on a Delta 2-7420 rocket from Space Launch Complex 2-West.
To be determined: ICON on an air-launched Pegasus XL rocket staged from Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands

Truth is what we seek.. July 1, 2018


Truth is what we seek

Check out these Guys

Fantastic true reporting

Just the Facts and nothing more

Ikaika Marzo with Phillip Ong and John Stallman

Check out Ikaika Marzo on Facebook  Click Here

Phillip Ong on Youtube Click Here

So many super hero’s across this aina

Puna’s Super Hero’s continuing to help the community

 

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July 2, 2018 Lava Flow Continues (USGS Video)


Wow Life goes on here on the Big Island of Hawaii.

Several lava fissures starting to re-open.

More Lava at the shoreline coming, maybe from old lava tubes.

Pele is headed a little North west from what we have heard last few days

Today we have loud thunder or explosions. Big Clouds over the East Rift Zone.

The Year of the Lord’s Favor… Will FEMA GO BROKE IN 2018 ?


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2018 is this year going to reveal what we all have feared?

With so many natural disasters with in the past few years taxing FEMA’s piggy bank, what happens when its all gone?

What will America do when FEMA is broke? Do you have home owners insurance or renters insurance to cover your damages?

Just to name a few places. Texas, Hawaii, Louisiana, Florida, New York, New Jersey, East Coast, West Coast fires and Mudslides, Earth Quakes, Extended weather, unusual tornadoes and hurricane seasons are becoming more familiar everyday.

FEMA’s Budget 13.9 Billion dollars has been set aside for 2018

We are only into 6 months of the year and the balance left is $21 million at the end of May 2018. That does not include Hawaii’s Volcano Eruption.

 

 

U.S. Billion-Dollar Weather & Climate Disasters 2013-2018
  • Drought
  • Flooding
  • Freeze
  • Severe Storm
  • Tropical Cyclone
  • Wildfire
  • Winter Storm

 

2018
Hawaii Volcano Kilauea Eruption
May 3, 2018
Still continues to erupt lava, As of 6-15-2018 there are 700+ structures destroyed.  They have no idea how many more will be lost as the lava continues with no stopping in site.
Total Estimated Costs
TBD
Southeastern Severe Storms
March 2018
A potent severe storm system caused over 20 tornadoes across Alabama and also widespread hail damage from Texas to Florida. This system also created significant late-season snowfall and across many Eastern and Northeastern states.
Total Estimated Costs
TBD
3 Deaths
Northeast Winter Storm
March 2018
Powerful Nor’easter impacted Northeastern states MD, MA, NH, NJ, NY, PA, CT, DE, RA and VA. Damage due to high winds, heavy snow and heavy coastal erosion.
Total Estimated Costs
$1.8 Billion
9 Deaths
Central and Eastern Winter Storm
January 2018
A Nor’easter caused damage across many Northeastern states including MA, NJ, NY, CT, ME, NH, PA, MD, RI, SC, TN, VA, NC and GA.
Total Estimated Costs
$1.0 Billion
22 Deaths
2017
Western Wildfires, California Firestorm
Summer-Fall 2017
A historic firestorm damages or destroys over 15,000 homes, businesses and other structures across California in October. The combined destruction of the Tubbs, Atlas, Nuns and Redwood Valley wildfires represent the most costly wildfire event on record, also causing 44 deaths. Extreme wildfire conditions in early December also burned hundreds of homes in Los Angeles. Numerous other wildfires across many western and northwestern states burn over 9.8 million acres exceeding the 10-year annual average of 6.5 million acres. Montana in particular was affected by wildfires that burned in excess of 1 million acres. These wildfire conditions were enhanced by the preceding drought conditions in several states.
Total Estimated Costs
$18.0 ($18.2) Billion
54 Deaths
North Dakota, South Dakota and Montana Drought
Spring-Fall 2017
Extreme drought causes extensive impacts to agriculture in North Dakota, South Dakota and Montana. Field crops including wheat were severely damaged and the lack of feed for cattle forced ranchers to sell off livestock. This drought has also contributed to the increased potential for severe wildfires.
Total Estimated Costs
$2.5 Billion
0 Deaths
Hurricane Maria
September 2017
Category 4 hurricane made landfall in southeast Puerto Rico after striking the U.S. Virgin Island of St. Croix.
Maria’s high winds caused widespread devastation to Puerto Rico’s transportation, agriculture, communication and energy infrastructure. Extreme rainfall up to 37 inches caused widespread flooding and mudslides across the island. The interruption to commerce and standard living conditions will be sustained for a long period, as much of Puerto Rico’s infrastructure is rebuilt. Maria tied Hurricane Wilma (2005) for the most rapid intensification, strengthening from tropical depression to a category 5 storm in 54 hours. Maria’s landfall at Category 4 strength gives the U.S. a record three Category 4+ landfalls this year (Maria, Harvey, and Irma). A reanalysis on the number of deaths due to Maria is being conducted and will be updated in the coming months.
Total Estimated Costs
$90.0 ($90.9) Billion
65 Deaths
Hurricane Irma
September 2017
Category 4 hurricane made landfall at Cudjoe Key, Florida after devastating the U.S. Virgin Islands – St John and St Thomas – as a category 5 storm. The Florida Keys were heavily impacted, as 25% of buildings were destroyed while 65% were significantly damaged. Severe wind and storm surge damage also occurred along the coasts of Florida and South Carolina. Jacksonville, FL and Charleston, SC received near-historic levels of storm surge causing significant coastal flooding. Irma maintained a maximum sustained wind of 185 mph for 37 hours, the longest in the satellite era. Irma also was a category 5 storm for longer than all other Atlantic hurricanes except Ivan in 2004.
Total Estimated
Costs
$50.0 ($50.5) Billion
97 Deaths
Hurricane Harvey
August 2017
Category 4 hurricane made landfall near Rockport, Texas causing widespread damage. Harvey’s devastation
was most pronounced due to the large region of extreme rainfall producing historic flooding across Houston and surrounding areas. More than 30 inches of rainfall fell on 6.9 million people, while 1.25 million experienced over 45 inches and 11,000 had over 50 inches, based on 7-day rainfall totals ending August 31. This historic U.S. rainfall caused massive flooding that displaced over 30,000 people and damaged or destroyed over 200,000 homes and businesses.
Total Estimated Costs
$125.0 ($126.3) Billion
89 Deaths
Midwest Severe Weather
June 2017
Severe hail and high wind damage impacting Nebraska, Illinois and Iowa. More than one dozen tornadoes
touched down across parts of Iowa, in addition to other storm damage.
Total Estimated Costs
$1.4 Billion
0 Deaths
Midwest Severe Weather
June 2017
Severe hail, high winds and numerous tornadoes impact many states over several days including WY, TX, NE, KS, MO, IA, IL, PA, VA, NY.
Total Estimated Costs
$1.5 ($1.6) Billion
0 Deaths
Minnesota Hail Storm and Upper Midwest Severe Weather
June 2017
Severe hail and high winds cause considerable damage across Minnesota and Wisconsin. The Minneapolis metro area in particular was damaged from large, destructive hail impacting many buildings and vehicles. This damage is comparable to the May 15, 1998 Minnesota hail storm that was also very costly.
Total Estimated Costs
$2.4 Billion
0 Deaths
Colorado Hail Storm and Central Severe Weather
May 2017
Hail storm and wind damage impacting several states including CO, OK, TX, NM, MO. The most costly impacts were in the Denver metro region where baseball-sized hail caused the most expensive hail storm in Colorado history, with insured losses exceeding 2.2 (2.3) billion.
Total Estimated Costs
$3.4 ($3.5) Billion
0 Deaths
Missouri and Arkansas Flooding and Central Severe Weather
May 2017
A period of heavy rainfall up to 15 inches over a multi-state region in the Midwest caused historic levels of flooding along many rivers. The flooding was most severe in Missouri, Arkansas and southern Illinois where levees were breached and towns were flooded. There was widespread damage to homes, businesses, infrastructure and agriculture. Severe storms also caused additional impacts during the flooding event across a number of central and southern states.
Total Estimated Costs
$1.7 Billion
20 Deaths
South/Southeast Severe Weather
March 2017
Large hail and high winds in Texas north of the Dallas metro region caused widespread damage to structures and vehicles. Severe storms also caused damage across several other states (OK, TN, KY, MS, AL) due to the combination of high winds, hail and tornadoes.
Total Estimated Costs
$2.7 ($2.8) Billion
0 Deaths
Southeast Freeze
March 2017
Severe freeze heavily damaged fruit crops across several southeastern states (SC, GA, NC, TN, AL, MS, FL, KY, VA). Mid-March freezes are not climatologically unusual in the Southeast, however many crops were blooming 3+ weeks early due to unusually warm temperatures during the preceding weeks. Damage was most severe in Georgia and South Carolina. Crops most impacted include peaches, blueberries, strawberries and apples, among others.
Total Estimated Costs
$1.0 Billion
0 Deaths
Midwest Tornado Outbreak
March 2017
Tornado outbreak and wind damage across many Midwestern states (AR, IA, IL, KS, MI, MN, MO, NE, NY, OH, WI). Missouri and Illinois were impacted by numerous tornadoes while Michigan and New York were affected by destructive, straight-line winds following the storm system. Nearly one million customers lost power in Michigan alone due to sustained high winds, which affected several states from Illinois to New York.
Total Estimated Costs
$2.2 Billion
2 Deaths
Central/Southeast Tornado Outbreak
March 2017
Over 70 tornadoes developed during a widespread outbreak across many central and southern states causing significant damage. There was also widespread straight-line wind and hail damage. This was the second largest tornado outbreak to occur early in 2017.
Total Estimated Costs
$1.8 ($1.9) Billion
6 Deaths
California Flooding
February 2017
Heavy, persistent rainfall across northern and central California created substantial property and infrastructure damage from flooding, landslides and erosion. Notable impacts include severe damage to the Oroville Dam spillway, which caused a multi-day evacuation of 188,000 residents downstream. Excessive rainfall also caused flood damage in the city of San Jose, as Coyote Creek overflowed its banks and inundated neighborhoods forcing 14,000 residents to evacuate.
Total Estimated Costs
$1.5 Billion
5 Deaths
Southern Tornado Outbreak and Western Storms
January 2017
High wind damage occurred across southern California near San Diego followed by 79 confirmed tornadoes during an outbreak across many southern states including AL, FL, GA, LA, MS, SC and TX. This was the 3rd most tornadoes to occur in a single outbreak during a winter month (Dec.-Feb.) for records going back to 1950.
Total Estimated Costs
$1.1 Billion
24 Deaths
2016
Western/Southeast Wildfires
Summer-Fall 2016
Western and Southern states experienced an active wildfire season with over 5.0 million acres burned nationally. Most notable was the firestorm that impacted Gatlinburg, Tennessee with hurricane-force wind gusts in extremely dry conditions creating volatile wildfire behavior. These wildfires destroyed nearly 2,500 structures and caused 14 fatalities. The drought conditions in many areas of the Southeast and California worsened the wildfire potential.
Total Estimated Costs
$2.4 ($2.5) Billion
21 Deaths
West/Northeast/Southeast Drought
2016
California’s 5-year drought persisted during 2016 while new areas of extreme drought developed in states across the Northeast and Southeast. The long-term impacts of the drought in California have damaged forests where 100+ million trees have perished and are a public safety hazard. The agricultural impacts were reduced in California as water prices and crop fallowing declined. However, agricultural impacts developed in Northeast and Southeast due to stressed water supplies.
Total Estimated Costs
$3.5 ($3.6) Billion
0 Deaths
Hurricane Matthew
October 2016
Hurricane Matthew paralleled the Southeast coast from Florida to North Carolina causing widespread damage from wind, storm surge and inland flooding. The most costly impacts were due to historic levels of river flooding in eastern North Carolina where 100,000 homes, businesses and other structures were damaged. This inland flooding was comparable to Hurricane Floyd (1999) that also impacted
eastern North Carolina. Matthew narrowly missed landfall on Florida’s east coast as a powerful category 4 storm.
Total Estimated Costs
$10.0 ($10.5) Billion
49 Deaths
Louisiana Flooding
August 2016
A historic flood devastated a large area of southern Louisiana resulting from 20 to 30 inches of rainfall over several days. Watson, Louisiana received an astounding 31.39 inches of rain from the storm. Two-day rainfall totals in the hardest hit areas have a 0.2% chance of occurring in any given year: a 1 in 500 year event. More than 30,000 people were rescued from the floodwaters that damaged or destroyed over 50,000 homes, 100,000 vehicles and 20,000 businesses. This is the most damaging U.S. flood event since Superstorm Sandy impacted the Northeast in 2012.
Total Estimated Costs
$10.0 ($10.5) Billion
13 Deaths
Rockies and Northeast Severe Weather
July 2016
Severe storms across the Rockies and Northeastern states (CO, WY, VA, MD, PA, NJ, NY) caused large hail and high wind damage. Storm damage in Colorado was the most costly due to hail.
Total Estimated Costs
$1.5 Billion
0 Deaths
West Virginia Flooding and Ohio Valley Tornadoes
June 2016
Torrential rainfall caused destructive flooding through many West Virginia towns, damaging thousands of homes and businesses and causing considerable loss of life. Over 1,500 roads and bridges were damaged or destroyed making the impact on infrastructure comparable to the historic 2013 Colorado flood. The storm system also produced numerous tornadoes causing damage across several Ohio Valley states.
Total Estimated Costs
$1.0 Billion
23 Deaths
Rockies/Central Tornadoes and Severe Weather
May 2016
Sustained period of severe thunderstorms and tornadoes affecting several states including Montana, Colorado, Kansas, Missouri and Texas. The most concentrated days for tornado development were on May 22 and 24. Additional damage was created by straight-line high wind and hail damage.
Total Estimated Costs
$1.1 ($1.2) Billion
0 Deaths
Plains Tornadoes and Central Severe Weather
May 2016
Tornadoes and severe storms cause widespread damage across the Plains and Central states (NE, MO, TX, OK, KS, CO, IL, KY, TN) over a multi-day period. The damage from tornadoes and high wind was most costly in Nebraska and Missouri.
Total Estimated Costs
$1.7 ($1.8) Billion
2 Deaths
South/Southeast Tornadoes
April 2016
Large outbreak of tornadoes affects numerous states across the South and Southeast. Additional damage also from large hail and straight-line wind during the multi-day thunderstorm event.
Total Estimated Costs
$2.4 ($2.5) Billion
6 Deaths
Houston Flooding
April 2016
A period of extreme rainfall up to 17 inches created widespread urban flooding in Houston and surrounding suburbs. Thousands of homes and businesses were damaged and more than 1,800 high water rescues were conducted. This represents the most widespread flooding event to affect Houston since Tropical Storm Allison in 2001.
Total Estimated Costs
$2.7 ($2.8) Billion
8 Deaths
North/Central Texas Hail Storm
April 2016
Widespread severe hail damage across north and central Texas including the cities of Plano, Wylie, Frisco, Allen and San Antonio. The damage in San Antonio was particularly severe as the National Weather Service verified reports of hail size reaching 4.5 inches in diameter. This ranks as one of the most costly hail events to affect the United States.
Total Estimated Costs
$3.5 ($3.7) Billion
0 Deaths
North Texas Hail Storm
March 2016
Large hail and strong winds caused considerable damage in heavily populated areas of north Texas. This damage was most notable in the cities of Dallas, Fort Worth and Plano.
Total Estimated Costs
$2.1 ($2.2) Billion
0 Deaths
Southern Severe Weather
March 2016
Severe hail impacts the Fort Worth and Arlington metro region in Texas. Additional large hail and high wind damage occurred in other locations of Texas, Louisiana and Mississippi.
Total Estimated Costs
$1.2 ($1.3) Billion
1 Death
Texas and Louisiana Flooding
March 2016
Multiple days of heavy rainfall averaging 15 to 20 inches led to widespread flooding along the Sabine River basin on the Texas and Louisiana border. This prompted numerous evacuations, high-water rescues and destruction, as more than 1,000 homes and businesses were damaged or destroyed.
Total Estimated Costs
$2.3 ($2.4) Billion
5 Deaths
Southeast and Eastern Tornadoes
February 2016
Early outbreak of tornadoes and severe weather across many southern and eastern states including (AL, CT, FL, GA, LA, MA, MD, MS, NC, NJ, NY, PA, SC, TX, VA). There were at least 50 confirmed tornadoes causing widespread damage.
Total Estimated Costs
$1.0 ($1.1) Billion
10 Deaths
2015
Western Drought
2015
Drought conditions were present across numerous western states (CA, NV, OR, WA, ID, MT, UT, AZ) with the most severe conditions continuing to plague California for all of 2015. The agriculture sector was again impacted by a lack of rainfall resulting in hundreds of
thousands of acres of farmland remaining fallow and requiring excess groundwater pumping to irrigate existing agriculture interests. Wildfire conditions were further enhanced by the ongoing drought. California experienced extensive damage from both drought and wildfire impacts. Drought conditions did improve dramatically across Texas and Oklahoma, in the form of several major flood events.
Total Estimated Costs
$4.5 ($4.8) Billion
0 Deaths
Texas Tornadoes and Midwest Flooding
December 2015
A powerful storm system packing unseasonably strong tornadoes caused widespread destruction in the Dallas metropolitan region, damaging well over 1,000 homes and businesses. This same potent system also produced intense rainfall over several Midwestern states triggering historic flooding that has approached or broken records at river gauges in several states (MO, IL, AR, TN, MS, LA). The flooding has over topped levees and caused damage in numerous areas. This historic storm also produced high wind, snow and ice impacts from New Mexico through the Midwest and into New England. Overall, the storm caused at least 50 deaths from the combined impact of tornadoes, flooding and winter weather.
Total Estimated Costs
$2.0 ($2.1) Billion
50 Deaths
Western and Alaskan Wildfires
Summer-Fall 2015
Wildfires burned over 10.1 million acres across the U.S. in 2015, surpassing 2006 for the highest annual total of U.S. acreage burned since record-keeping began in 1960. The most costly wildfires occurred in California where over 2,500 structures were destroyed due to the Valley and Butte wildfires with the insured losses alone exceeding 1.0 (1.1) billion. The most extensive wildfires occurred in Alaska where over 5 million acres burned within the state. There was extensive burnt acreage across other western states, most notably (OR, WA, ID, MT, ND, CO, WY, TX).
Total Estimated Costs
$3.0 ($3.2) Billion
12 Deaths
South Carolina and East Coast Flooding
October 2015
Historic levels of flooding impacted South Carolina causing widespread damage to many homes, businesses, public buildings and infrastructure. This interrupted commerce and closed major transportation corridors (such as I-95) for weeks as rivers slowly receded. Locally extreme rainfall totals exceeding 20-inches were common resulting from the convergence of a powerful low pressure system / frontal boundary and copious moisture from Hurricane Joaquin in the Atlantic.
Total Estimated Costs
$2.0 ($2.1) Billion
25 Deaths
Central and Northeast Severe Weather
June 2015
Severe storms across numerous Central and Northeast states (CO, CT, IA, IL, MD, MI, NJ, NY, PA, SD, VA, WI) with widespread hail and high wind damage.
Total Estimated Costs
$1.2 ($1.3) Billion
1 Death
Texas and Oklahoma Flooding and Severe Weather
May 2015
A slow-moving system caused tremendous rainfall and subsequent flooding to occur in Texas and Oklahoma. The Blanco river in Texas swelled from 5 feet to a crest of more than 40 feet over several hours causing considerable property damage and loss of life. The city of Houston also experienced flooding which resulted in hundreds of high-water rescues. The damage in Texas alone exceeded 1.0 (1.1) billion. There was also damage in other states (KS, CO, AR, OH, LA, GA, SC) from associated severe storms.
Total Estimated Costs
$2.5 ($2.7) Billion
31 Deaths
Southern Plains Tornadoes
May 2015
Tornado outbreak across the Southern Plain states (IA, KS, NE, OK, CO, SD, TX) with 122 tornadoes. The most costly damage occurred across Texas and Oklahoma.
Total Estimated Costs
$1.3 ($1.4) Billion
4 Deaths
South/Southeast Severe Weather
April 2015
Severe storms across the South and Southeastern states (AL, AR, FL, GA, KS, LA, MS, NC, OK, SC, TN, TX). High winds and severe hail created the most significant damage in Texas.
Total Estimated Costs
$1.3 ($1.4) Billion
0 Deaths
Midwest/Ohio Valley Severe Weather
April 2015
Severe storms across the Midwest and Ohio Valley including the states (AR, IA, IL, IN, KS, KY, MI, MO, NC, OH, OK, PA, TN, TX, WI, WV). Large hail and high winds created the most damage across Missouri and Illinois.
Total Estimated Costs
$1.6 ($1.7) Billion
2 Deaths
Central and Eastern Winter storm, Cold Wave
February 2015
A large winter storm and associated cold wave impacted many central, eastern and northeastern states (CT, DE, GA, IL, KY, MA, MD, ME, MI, NC, NH, NJ, NY, OH, PA, RI, SC, TN, VA). The city of Boston was particularly impacted as feet of snow continued to accumulate causing load-stress on buildings and clogging transportation corridors. Total, direct losses in Massachusetts alone exceed 1.0 (1.1) billion for this event, with considerable damage in many other states.
Total Estimated Costs
$3.0 ($3.2) Billion
30 Deaths
2014
Western Drought
2014
Historic drought conditions affected the majority of California for all of 2014 making it the worst drought on record for the state. Surrounding states and parts of Texas, Oklahoma and Kansas also experienced continued severe drought conditions. This is a continuation of
drought conditions that have persisted for several years.
Total Estimated Costs
$4.0 ($4.2) Billion
0 Deaths
Rockies/Plains Severe Weather
September 2014
Severe storms across the Rockies and Plains states (CO, KS, TX). Large hail and high winds created significant damage across eastern Colorado and Texas, particularly in the Dallas metro area.
Total Estimated Costs
$1.4 ($1.5) Billion
 0 Deaths
Michigan and Northeast Flooding
August 2014
Heavy rainfall in excess of 5 inches caused significant flooding in cities across Michigan damaging thousands of cars, business, homes and other infrastructure. Flooding also occurred across Maryland and New York’s Long Island, as the slow-moving storm system delivered 24-hour rainfall exceeding 6 and 12 inches, respectively, creating more flood damage. Islip, NY received 13.57 inches of rain over a 24-hour period on Aug 12-13 setting a new 24-hour precipitation record for New York.
Total Estimated Costs
$1.0 ($1.1) Billion
2 Deaths
Rockies/Central Plains Severe Weather
June 2014
Severe storms across the Rockies and Central Plains states (NE, KS, WY, IA, AR). Wind gusts exceeding 90 mph and baseball to softball sized hail caused severe damage to structures and vehicles in central and eastern Nebraska.
Total
Estimated Costs
$1.9 ($2.0) Billion
2 Deaths
Rockies/Midwest/Eastern Severe Weather
May 2014
Severe storms across the Rockies, Midwest and Eastern states (CO, MT, IA, IL, IN, OH, SC, VA, PA, DE, NY) with the most costly damage in Colorado, Illinois and Pennsylvania.
Total Estimated Costs
$3.7 ($3.9) Billion
0 Deaths
Midwest/Southeast/Northeast Tornadoes and Flooding
April 2014
Tornado outbreak across the Midwest, Southeast and Northeast states
(AL, AR, DE, FL, GA, KS, MD, MO, MS, NC, NJ, NY, PA, TN, VA) with 83 confirmed tornadoes. Mississippi had its 3rd greatest number of tornadoes reported for any day since 1950. Torrential rainfall in the Florida panhandle also caused major flooding, as Pensacola set new 1-day and 2-day precipitation records of 15.55 and 20.47 inches, respectively. Flooding rains were also reported in coastal Alabama, as Mobile received 11.24 inches of rain, the third greatest calendar day rainfall total for the city.
Total Estimated Costs
$1.7 ($1.8) Billion
33 Deaths
Plains Severe Weather
April 2014
Severe storms across the Plains states (IL, KS, MO, TX) causing considerable hail and wind damage in Texas.
Total Estimated Costs
$1.4 ($1.5) Billion
0 Deaths
Midwest/Southeast/Northeast Winter Storm
January 2014
Winter storm caused widespread damage across numerous Midwest, Southeast and Northeastern states (AL, GA, IL, IN, KY, MD, MI, MO, MS, NC, NJ, NY, OH, PA, SC, TN, VA).
Total Estimated Costs
$2.2 ($2.3) Billion
16 Deaths
2013
Western/Plains Drought/Heatwave
Spring-Fall 2013
The 2013 drought slowly dissipated from the historic levels of the 2012 drought, as conditions improved across many Midwestern and Plains states. However, moderate to extreme drought did remain or expand into western states (AZ, CA, CO, IA, ID, IL, KS, MI, MN, MO, ND, NE, NM, NV, OK, OR, SD, TX, UT, WA, WI, WY). In comparison to 2011 and 2012 drought conditions the US experienced only moderate crop losses across the central agriculture states.
Total Estimated Costs
$10.4 ($11.3) Billion
53 Deaths
Ohio Valley Tornadoes
November 2013
Late-season outbreak of tornadoes and severe weather over the Ohio Valley (IL, IN, KY, MI, MO, OH) with 70 confirmed tornadoes. Most severe impacts occurred across Illinois and Indiana.
Total Estimated Costs
$1.1 ($1.2) Billion
8 Deaths
Colorado Flooding
September 2013
A stalled frontal boundary over Colorado led to record rainfall, as some areas received > 15 inches over several days. This resulted in historic flooding across numerous cities and towns. Destruction of residences, businesses and transportation infrastructure was widespread.
Total Estimated Costs
$1.5 ($1.6) Billion
9 Deaths
Midwest Severe Weather
August 2013
Severe weather and large hail causes considerable damage across Minnesota and Wisconsin.
Total Estimated Costs
$1.0 ($1.1) Billion
0 Deaths
Midwest/Plains/Northeast Tornadoes
May 2013
Outbreak of tornadoes and severe weather over the Midwest, Plains and Northeast (IL, IN, KS, MO, NY, OK, TX) with 92 confirmed tornadoes including the deadly tornado that struck El Reno, OK. There was also significant damage resulting from hail and straight-line wind.
Total Estimated Costs
$1.8 ($2.0) Billion
10 Deaths
Midwest/Plains/East Tornadoes
May 2013
Outbreak of tornadoes and severe weather over the Midwest, Plains and Eastern states (GA, IA, IL, KS, MO, NY, OK, TX) with 59 confirmed tornadoes including the deadly tornado that impacted Moore, OK. Many destructive tornadoes remained on the ground for an extended time.
Total Estimated Costs
$2.4 ($2.6) Billion
27 Deaths
Illinois Flooding and Severe Weather
April 2013
A slow-moving storm system created rainfall totals of 5 to 10 inches across northern and central Illinois including the Chicago metro. This resulted in damage to many homes and businesses. There was also severe weather damage from wind and hail across Indiana and Missouri.
Total Estimated Costs
$1.1 ($1.2) Billion
4 Deaths
Midwest/Plains Severe Weather
April 2013
Severe weather across the Midwest and Plains states (IN, KS, MO, NE) with a total of 26 confirmed tornadoes. Considerable damage resulting from hail and straight-line wind.
Total Estimated Costs
$1.4 ($1.6) Billion
1 Death
Southeast Severe Weather
March 2013
Severe weather over the Southeast (MS, AL, GA, TN) with 10 confirmed tornadoes. Considerable damage resulting from large hail and straight-line wind.
Total Estimated Costs
$2.0 ($2.2) Billion
1 Death

PETS, VOLCANO AND YOU


A volcano eruption can put many animals at risk.

Nothing, No-one, nor any animal or wild life is exempt from the vapors and / or ashes. Who ever is in the path of the downfall will be severally burned and death is usually imminent.

Animals who inhale or ingest volcanic ash are at risk for fluoride poisoning. This could cause internal bleeding, long-term bone damage and teeth loss.

Cows, sheep, goats and horses should be rounded up and put in a closed barn, provided with hay and clean water until the ash dissipated.

Birds were also affected by the volcano. The ponds became heavy with mud and they were unable to fly because their wings were covered with ash.

Guidelines for pet owners concerning animal health after a volcano:

  • if you notice any symptoms or smell sulfur, rotten eggs or a strong acidic smell take reasonable action to protect your pets by limiting their time outdoors
  • any pets with respiratory problems should be well protected from the atmosphere
  • cover outdoor aviaries to protect birds
  • find suitable shelter for any pets that usually live outdoors.

“Pet owners should limit the amount of time that they and their animals spend outside if they detect the ash and consult a vet if they have any concerns about the health of their pets.”

Make sure that you bathe your pet often in Luke warm. Keep any wounds covered and dry. Change bandages everyday for any wounds.

Fine Glass textured ash can cut the lungs if inhaled. Keep all pets in doors or completely covered and out of the elements as well as possible.

 

I know that the ASPCA steps up during all Natural Disasters to rescue all animals. I have witnessed that first hand during a volcano eruption 15 miles from my home. They came and rescued trapped animals with trucks, trailers and by helicopter. Please help this organization that really does their job…

Please Help and Donate Today.

ASPCA NEEDS OUR HELP.. Please DONATE TODAY
ASPCA logo. (PRNewsfoto/ASPCA)

The Struggle For These Animals Are “REAL”


LINKS FOR FUND RAISERS

EMERGENCY DONATIONS NEEDED FOR HAWAII

The Struggle For These Animals Are “REAL”

As you all know by now, on the Big Island of Hawaii on May 3, 2018 we had an volcano eruption. Leilani Estates was the first Subdivision to be affected. Many animals at that time were left behind. Some had no choice but to leave their pets.

This community has come together with many volunteers. They have activated their own search and rescue efforts. The Rescue Agency pay for all the gas, food and any other expenses. Now with donations starting to come in has made a big improvement for the rescue animals. People have taken animals into their homes for temporary housing. Everyone is pitching in where they can. The Rescue Agency’s are full. Some have erected temporary structures to house the animals.

June 5, 2018 UPDATE: There have been 4 of new areas added for the animals to be rescued.

All Of Hawaii’s Animal Rescue Agency’s are still rescuing the Animals Left Behind in this Crisis.

A Special Shout Out To All Of the Hawaii and Mainland Rescue Agency’s For Pitching In and Helping.

The Animals Thank You

Every Agency Could Use A $1 DONATION

 


JOIN US ON FACEBOOK


JOIN US ON FACEBOOK


Hawaii Lava Flow Animal Rescue

The Hawaiʻi Lava Flow Animal Rescue Network (HLFARN) was created to serve as an informational hub for those needing assistance with pets and animals on farms during the 2018 eruption of Kilauea on the Big Island of Hawaiʻi. But it has become so much more than that. HLFARN has blossomed from a group of strangers into an Ohana; a family of people whose love for animals has taken them into the path of an erupting volcano to rescue pets and farm animals that have been left behind.

https://www.gofundme.com/hlfarn



BIG ISLAND LOST AND FOUND PETS ONLY

We are sending out a “HOLLA” for you to share Please.

We have several Lost and Found pets that need their owners. They were scared and hungry, but now are safe. All organizations are looking for people to Sharing posts with friends and family is #1, volunteering time to help with the pets and offer space in their homes for these pets. Short Stay and Long Stay, permanent and temporary.

Please Contact : https://www.facebook.com/groups/BigIslandLostAndFoundPetsOnly/about/


WORLD WIDE LINKS FOR DONATIONS

CHECK US OUT ON FACEBOOK

The Vog Measurement and Prediction Project – VMAP.. Healthy Weather???


The Vog Measurement and Prediction Project (VMAP) provides real-time vog forecasts. With the help of our project collaborators vog forecasts are available to the public through this web site. Comments and inquiries can be directed to the appropriate contact. We welcome constructive comments from all VMAP users, and strive to provide the best possible service consistent with our mission and resources. Inquiries into actual measured values and concerns regarding hazardous conditions should be directed to the appropriate agency such as the Hawaii State Department of Health. The VMAP website is intended to be complementary to the data provided by other state and federal agencies.

Vog is primarily a mixture of sulfur dioxide (SO2) gas and sulfate (SO4) aerosol. SO2 (invisible) reacts with oxygen and moisture in the air to produce SO4 aerosol (visible). SO2 is expected to be the main problem in areas near the vent (Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, Pahala, Na`alehu, Hawaiian Ocean View Estates) and SO4 aerosol is expected to be the main problem at locations far from the vent (Kona and farther north and west). For more information on vog visit the FAQ page here.

Vog and Your Health

The links and material on this page are provided to summarize findings about the effects of vog on health.

Health Effects

How vog affects human health is the topic of active research. Children and those with pre-existing lung conditions are the most vulnerable to its effects. Some studies show that children and those with pre-existing respiratory problems are more likely to visit a medical clinic or emergency room during vog episodes. Although vog exposure has not been shown to cause childhood asthma, it has been shown to aggravate asthma in those already diagnosed with the condition.

When exposed to vog, some people report eye, nose, throat, and/or skin irritation, coughing and/or phlegm, chest tightness and/or shortness of breath, headache, and increased susceptibility to respiratory ailments. Some people also report fatigue and/or dizziness. One researcher also found vog is associated with high blood pressure. Another researcher found a link to anxiety. More detail on the health effects on vog can be found in the References section, or by visiting the International Volcanic Health Hazard Network.

Disclaimer: The information contained in the VMAP website is for general information purposes only. While we endeavor to keep the information accurate and up-to-date, we make no representations, warranties, or guarantees about the completeness, accuracy, reliability, suitability, or availability with respect to the VMAP website or the information, products, services, or related graphics contained on the VMAP website for any purpose. Although every effort is made to avoid interruptions to VMAP access, any reliance upon any information presented is strictly at your own risk. In no event will the University of Hawaii at Manoa, the UH-M Department of Atmospheric Sciences, the VMAP team, or any personnel or collaborator associated with VMAP be liable for any losses or damages (direct or indirect) without limitation whatsoever in connection with the use of the VMAP website. The general public is welcome to use the VMAP at this time and by its use implicitly agrees to the terms of this disclaimer.

CLICK HERE FOR VMAP

 

THE HEALTH HAZARDS OF VOLCANIC ASH (part 6 Precautions for Children)


THE HEALTH HAZARDS OF VOLCANIC ASH

A guide for the public

This   document   has   been   prepared   by   the International  Volcanic  Health  Hazard  Network (IVHHN), Cities and Volcanoes Commission, GNS Science and the United States Geological Survey (USGS)  to  promote  the  safety  of  those  who experience volcanic ashfall. This guide explains the potential health effects of volcanic ash and gives details on how to protect yourself and your family in the event of a volcanic ash fall.

Precautions for Children

Children face the same hazards from the suspension of ash as other age groups, but their exposure may be increased because
they are physically smaller and are less likely to adopt reasonable, prudent, preventive measures to avoid unnecessary
exposure to ash. While evidence suggests that ingestion of small amounts of ash is not hazardous, we recommend that you take
the following precautions.
  • Keep children indoors if possible.
  • Children should be advised against strenuous play or running when ash is in the air, since exertion leads to heavier breathing, drawing small particles more deeply into the lungs.
  • Communities in heavy ash fall areas may wish to organize day-care programs to free parents for clean-up tasks.
  • If children must be outdoors when ash is present in the air, they should wear a mask (preferably one approved by IVHHN). Many masks, however, are designed to fit adults rather than children.
  • Take particular care to prevent children playing in areas where ash is deep on the ground or piled up.
  • Long Pants, Long Sleeve Shirts, mask, goggles, Hats and gloves.

Reduce the exposure to ash:

The most effective way to reduce exposure, especially for people with particular susceptibilities (e.g., children and infants, older people and those with existing respiratory (lung) or cardiovascular (heart and blood vessels) disease) is to shelter somewhere which is not ashy, ideally inside a building where you can stay indoors for some time, if necessary. If you are very concerned about your health, take advice from a health professional.

Take steps to keep ash out of your indoor environment:

  • Close doors and windows, where possible.
  • If possible, seal up large gaps and spaces to the outdoors. For example, you could use tape and plastic sheeting, or rolled-up towels.
  • Try to set up a single entry/exit point for the building. Leave ashy clothes/shoes outside
  • Do not use any appliances (e.g., air conditioners) which suck in air from the outside. If the indoor environment is ashy, try to gently clean away the ash (e.g., using damp cloths)
  • Don’t use vacuum cleaners as they can blow out fine ash, back into the indoor space.

If you are staying indoors for a long time:

  • Make sure that the indoor environment does not get too hot. If it gets too hot, consider evacuating.
  • Don’t use cooking and heating stoves, or other appliances, which produce smoke.
  • Do not smoke cigarettes or other products.
  • Do not use un-fluted gas heaters, or outdoor appliances such as gas patio heaters or barbecues, indoors, due to risk of carbon monoxide poisoning.

Once the ash has settled, it important to remove it through clean-up activities, using water to dampen it first. You must wear a face mask if you are cleaning up settled ash.

When should I use respiratory protection?

If you cannot remove yourself from the ash, you may wish to use some sort of respiratory protection (e.g., face mask), or may be advised to do so by governmental or humanitarian agencies. Masks may be worn when:

1) you are outdoors and there is ash in the air (either during ash fall or afterwards, when it may be remobilized by wind, vehicles and human activities);

2) ash is being mobilized indoors or outdoors by activities such as removal/cleaning-up.

Masks can be worn during waking hours. It is not recommended to wear a face mask while sleeping as it will probably not stay fitted to the face, and it is harder to breathe with a face mask on.

Who can wear respiratory protection?

People with existing respiratory or cardiovascular disease should talk to a health professional about whether facemasks are suitable. Care should be taken to ensure that it is not harder to breathe when using any form of respiratory protection.

Masks are not usually designed to fit children’s faces (although some manufacturers are now producing small masks aimed at children but not infants). Exposure for children and infants should be reduced by staying in a non-ashy (indoor) environment wherever possible. If you do give a mask to a child, show the child how to fit it well, and be very careful it does not make breathing difficult.

What types of respiratory protection are most effective?

The following information will help you decide on which type of respiratory protection to use, but other factors, such as the cost and availability of the protective products, may also need to be taken into account.

When you wear respiratory protection, the effectiveness depends particularly on two factors:

1) how effective the mask or material is at filtering particles (stopping the ash from passing through the material);

2) the fit of the mask or material to the face (preventing particles from entering around the edges).

  • The most effective respiratory protection for adults is to wear a well-fitting, industry-certified face mask such as an N95 mask (also called P2, FFP2 or DS2 in different parts of the world). The certification will be printed on the mask. Such masks are usually disposable.
    • These are highly-efficient at filtering ash and are also usually designed to fit adult faces well, but may be too big for children.
    • Due to their tight fit, they may feel uncomfortable.
    • Using highly-effective masks can make breathing harder; if you have existing respiratory or cardiovascular disease, talk to a health professional about whether such masks are suitable for you.
    • These masks come in many different shapes and sizes. Some fold out into a mask shape and some have a ready-made cup-shape. Some have a valve on the front to improve comfort by letting hot, humid air out. All of these masks will be highly-effective at filtering ash, if worn properly.
  • Some non-certified face masks state that they are designed to filter ‘PM2.5’ (small particles less than 2.5 micrometres in diameter), which is likely to be the most harmful fraction of the ash.
    • These are probably highly-efficient at filtering ash but are often not designed to fit well to the face and so may not be very effective.
  • A standard, pleated surgical mask will be good at filtering ash as long as it fits well to the face. If it does not, it will provide less protection than an industry-certified face mask.
  • Simple healthcare masks (rectangular, non-pleated) do not filter ash well and also do not have ways to make a good seal to the face.
  • Hard-cup (also called nuisance-dust), ‘fashion’ and scooter masks are less effective at filtering ash compared to industry-certified and surgical masks, and may not fit well to the face.
  • Cloth materials (e.g., bandanas, t-shirts, veils, handkerchiefs) worn over the nose and mouth are less effective at filtering ash than most masks, so will offer less protection and they also tend not to fit well.
    • Increasing the number of layers of cloth improves the ability to filter ash but will still be less effective at filtering ash than most face masks.
  • Wetting materials does not improve the ability of masks or cloth to filter volcanic ash.

How should I put on a face mask?

  • With clean hands, take the mask out of the packaging. Avoid contaminating the inside of the mask with ash.
  • Open up any flaps and prepare the straps/loops for tying around the head or ears.
  • Fit the mask over the nose and mouth.
  • Fit the straps to the head:
    • If the mask has elasticated, adjustable straps, put them over your head with the top strap above your ears, around the top of your head, and the lower strap below your ears, towards the bottom of your head. Tighten the straps until the mask makes a seal around your face and is comfortable.
    • If the mask has non-adjustable straps, tie them snuggly around the head.
    • If the mask has ear loops, you may need to use the loops to tighten the mask (you could tie a knot in the loops if the mask is baggy on your face).
  • With both hands, gently press the nose clip over the nose so that it fits well across the nose and onto the face below the eyes. Do not pinch the clip.
  • Press the edges of the mask onto your face (around the cheeks and chin).
  • Once you have fitted the mask, cover the mask with both hands, being careful not to change the fit. If you are using a mask without a valve, breathe out sharply. If you are using a mask with a valve, cover the valve with your hand before breathing out, or breathe in sharply, instead. You should not be able to feel any air escaping/entering around the edges of the mask. Readjust the fit until the seal is tight.
  • If you cannot get the mask to fit, try to find a different mask which fits your face better.

Make sure your choice of respiratory protection fits to your face!

  • A good face mask may have a flexible metal nose clip, adjustable straps and may also have foam around the edges to help with the seal to your face.
  • When your face mask fits properly, there should be a good seal around your face so that you cannot feel any air coming in around the edges.
  • Make sure that spectacle/goggle frames do not affect the seal between the face mask and your face.
  • If you have facial hair, the face mask will not be as effective, because it cannot make a good seal to your face.
  • You can improve the fit and effectiveness of a face mask by tying a layer of cloth over it, although you are likely to find this less comfortable and you should not tie the cloth so tight that it makes breathing harder.

How long will a face mask last for?

  • Disposable masks are designed for single use (so packaging will often state that they should be disposed of after 8 hours) but they can be worn until you notice that they are clogged and/or breathing becomes harder, or if you notice the mask starting to break.
  • However, you may choose to replace them sooner for hygiene reasons and should check frequently for any degradation or growth of mold.
  • Some industrially-certified face masks have a ‘use-by’ date printed on them. After this date, the manufacturer cannot guarantee the integrity of the mask materials.
  • If supplies are limited, disposable masks can be stored for re-use in a clean bag or box to ensure that dust from the outside does not contaminate them. They should not be hung in a dusty environment.
  • Some manufacturers now make non-disposable masks for community use. These can often be washed, for hygiene reasons, but washing will not remove particles from the filtering layer, so they must also be discarded when they become clogged and/or breathing becomes harder, or if you notice the mask starting to break.For further information on the health hazards of volcanic ash and preparedness for ash fall, please download the IVHHN pamphlets available at: http://www.ivhhn.org/pamphlets.htmlThe above material is reproduced from the NEW IVHHN guidelines on Protection from Breathing Ash. Please visit that page for the source research and references.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

THE HEALTH HAZARDS OF VOLCANIC ASH (part 2 EYES)


THE HEALTH HAZARDS OF VOLCANIC ASH

A guide for the public

This   document   has   been   prepared   by   the International  Volcanic  Health  Hazard  Network (IVHHN), Cities and Volcanoes Commission, GNS Science and the United States Geological Survey (USGS)  to  promote  the  safety  of  those  who experience volcanic ashfall. This guide explains the potential health effects of volcanic ash and gives details on how to protect yourself and your family in the event of a volcanic ash fall.

Eye Symptoms

Eye irritation is a common health effect as pieces of grit can cause painful scratches in the front of the eye (corneal
abrasions) and conjunctivitis. Contact lens wearers need to be especially aware of this problem and leave out their lenses to
prevent corneal abrasion from occurring.

Common symptoms include:

  • Eyes feeling as though there are foreign particles in
  • them.
  • Eyes becoming painful, itchy or bloodshot.
  • Sticky discharge or tear
  • Corneal abrasions or scratches.
  • Acute conjunctivitis or the inflammation of the conjunctival sac that surrounds the eyeball due to the presence of ash, which leads to redness, burning of the eyes, and photosensitivity.

Eye protection

In fine-ash environments, wear goggles or corrective eyeglasses instead of contact lenses to protect eyes from irritation.

EYE FIRST AID

To minimize potential eye irritation:

  • Wear sunglasses (wrap-around styles are best) or goggles. The best are swimmers goggles that fit tight around the eyes.
  • Stay indoors when pollution levels are at their peak
  • Flush eyes with cool water or eye wash
  • Apply a cool compress to relieve discomfort
  • Lubricating eye drops may help prevent soreness or itching
  • Contact lens wearers should remove their lenses at the first sign of eye irritation and thoroughly clean them in their medicated cleaning solution

If symptoms persist you should seek advice from your doctor or optometry.

 

THE HEALTH HAZARDS OF VOLCANIC ASH (part 3 SKIN)

 

THE HEALTH HAZARDS OF VOLCANIC ASH (part 1 LUNGS)


THE HEALTH HAZARDS OF VOLCANIC ASH

A guide for the public

This   document   has   been   prepared   by   the International  Volcanic  Health  Hazard  Network (IVHHN), Cities and Volcanoes Commission, GNS Science and the United States Geological Survey (USGS)  to  promote  the  safety  of  those  who experience volcanic ashfall. This guide explains the potential health effects of volcanic ash and gives details on how to protect yourself and your family in the event of a volcanic ash fall.

What is volcanic ash?

Volcanic ash is composed of fine particles of fragmented volcanic
rock (less than 2 mm diameter). Volcanic ash is often hot very
close to the volcano but is cool when it falls at greater distances.
It is formed during volcanic explosions, from avalanches of hot
rock that flow down the side of volcanoes, or from red-hot liquid
lava spray. Ash varies in appearance depending upon the type of
volcano and the form of the eruption. Thus, it can range in color
from light grey to black and can vary in size from being like grit
to being as fine as talcum powder. Airborne ash blocks out
sunlight, reducing visibility and sometimes causes complete
darkness during day light.
Large ash deposits can incorporate into existing soils and become the future topsoil of a volcanic region. The fertility of the soils around many volcanoes is due to old ash deposits. This beneficial effect of volcanism outweighs, over time, the hazards.
Eruptions can also generate thunder and lightning from
friction between the fine, airborne particles which can be
localized above the volcano or accompany large ash plumes as
they move downwind from infrequent eruptions, so
fertile volcanic areas are often densely populated.
Freshly fallen ash particles can have acid coatings which may
cause irritation to the lungs and eyes. This acid coating is rapidly
removed by rain, which may then pollute local water supplies.
Acidic ash can also damage vegetation, leading to crop failure.
In most eruptions, volcanic ash causes relatively few health problems, but generates much anxiety. People can be more
fearful of the health hazards of volcanic ash and gases than of the risk of dying from more major hazards, such as pyroclastic
flows. However, ash falls can affect very wide areas around volcanoes and may cause major disruption to normal living.
Medical services can expect an increase in the number of patients
with respiratory and eye symptoms during and after an
ashfall event (see IVHHN guidelines on advice to the medical community).

What are the effects of ash on health?

Effects of ash on health may be divided into several categories:

Respiratory effects, eye symptoms, skin irritation and indirect
effects.

Respiratory effects

In some eruptions, ash particles can be so fine that they are
breathed deep into the lungs. With high exposure, even healthy
individuals will experience chest discomfort with increased
coughing and irritation.
Common acute (short-term) symptoms include:
  • Nasal irritation and discharge (runny nose).
  • Throat irritation and sore throat, sometimes accompanied by dry coughing.
  • People with pre-existing chest complaints may develop severe bronchitic symptoms which last some days beyond
  • exposure to ash (for example, hacking cough, production of sputum, wheezing, or shortness of breath).
  • Airway irritation for people with asthma or bronchitis; common complaints of people with asthma include
  • shortness of breath, wheezing and coughing.
  • Breathing becomes uncomfortable.
In rare circumstances, long-term exposure to fine volcanic ash may lead to serious lung diseases. For these diseases to occur, the
ash must be very fine, contain crystalline silica (for the disease silicosis to occur) and the people must be exposed to the ash in
high concentrations over many years. Exposure to crystalline silica in volcanic ash is typically of short duration (days to weeks),
and studies suggest that the recommended exposure limits (similar in most countries) can be exceeded for short periods of
time for the general population.
People suffering from asthma or other lung problems such as bronchitis and emphysema, and severe heart problems are most at risk.

 

Why are people with chronic lung problems at special risk?

The fine ash particles irritate the airways and cause them to
contract, making breathing more difficult in people who already have
lung problems. The fine dust also causes the lining of the airways to
produce more secretions which can cause people to cough and breathe
more heavily. Asthma sufferers, especially children who may be
heavily exposed to the ash when they play, may suffer bouts of
coughing, tightness of the chest and wheezing. Some people who have never knowingly had asthma before, may experience asthma symptoms following an ash fall, especially if they go outdoors in the ash and over-exert themselves.

What factors affect respiratory symptoms?

The development of respiratory symptoms from the inhalation of volcanic ash depends on a number of factors. These include the
concentration of particles in the air, the proportion of fine particles in the ash, the frequency and duration of exposure, the
presence of crystalline silica and volcanic gases or aerosols mixed with the ash, and meteorological conditions. Existing
health conditions and the use of respiratory protective
equipment will also influence the symptoms experienced.

THE HEALTH HAZARDS OF VOLCANIC ASH (part 2 EYES)

THE HEALTH HAZARDS OF VOLCANIC ASH (part 4 Indirect health effects )


THE HEALTH HAZARDS OF VOLCANIC ASH

A guide for the public

This   document   has   been   prepared   by   the International  Volcanic  Health  Hazard  Network (IVHHN), Cities and Volcanoes Commission, GNS Science and the United States Geological Survey (USGS)  to  promote  the  safety  of  those  who experience volcanic ashfall. This guide explains the potential health effects of volcanic ash and gives details on how to protect yourself and your family in the event of a volcanic ash fall.

Indirect Effects of Ash Fall

As well as the short and long term health risks, indirect impacts of large ash falls must also be considered. These mainly arise from the secondary consequences of ash fall.

Effects on roads

The reduction in visibility from airborne ash alone may cause accidents. This danger is compounded by ash
covering roads. Not only are road markings covered up, but thin layers of either wet or dry ash are very
slippery, reducing traction. Thick deposits of ash may make roads impassable, cutting off communities from
basic supplies.

Effects on Power

Ash fall can lead to power cuts. These may have implications for health due to lack of heating
or other infrastructural requirements that depend on electricity. Wet ash is conductive, so it is essential
that safe operating procedures are stringently followed when cleaning power supply equipment.

Effects on water supplies

Ash fall can cause contamination of water or clogging and damage of water supply equipment. Small, open
water supplies such as domestic water tanks with roof drainage are especially vulnerable to volcanic ash fall,
and even small quantities of ash may cause problems for potability. While the risk of toxicity is low, the pH
may be reduced or chlorination inhibited. During and after ash falls, there is also likely to be extra water
demand for clean-up, resulting in water shortages.

Effects on sanitation

(waste water disposal etc).
The temporary disablement of municipal sanitation systems may lead to increased disease in affected areas.

Risk Of Roof Collapse

1) Roofs can collapse from the weight of ash, resulting in injury or death for those underneath.
2) There is a danger of roof collapse whilst clearing ash from roofs due to the increased load of a person on an already overloaded roof.
3) In several eruptions people have died after falling from their roofs while cleaning up ash.

Animal Health

If the ash is coated in hydrofluoric acid, the ash can be very toxic to grazing animals if they ingest ash-covered grass and soil.

THE HEALTH HAZARDS OF VOLCANIC ASH (part 3 SKIN)


THE HEALTH HAZARDS OF VOLCANIC ASH

A guide for the public

This   document   has   been   prepared   by   the International  Volcanic  Health  Hazard  Network (IVHHN), Cities and Volcanoes Commission, GNS Science and the United States Geological Survey (USGS)  to  promote  the  safety  of  those  who experience volcanic ashfall. This guide explains the potential health effects of volcanic ash and gives details on how to protect yourself and your family in the event of a volcanic ash fall.

 

Skin Irritation

While not common, volcanic ash can cause skin irritation for some people, especially if the ash is acidic.

Symptoms include:

  • Irritation and reddening of the skin.
  • Secondary infections due to scratching.

Protective Clothing should be worn when you are outdoors.

  • Long Sleeve Shirt
  • Long Pants
  • Socks and Shoes
  • Gloves
  • Hat

Depending on the type of volcano Kilauea is a basaltic shield volcano, erupting a type of basalt known as tholeiite. This type of lava is the dominant extrusive during the shield building (the main stage) of hawaiian volcanism and is the dominant basalt type erupted on Earth.

Pele’s hair is a form of lava. It is named after Pele, the Hawaiian goddess of volcanoes. It can be defined as volcanic glass fibers or thin strands of volcanic glass.[1] The strands are formed through the stretching of molten basaltic glass from lava, usually from lava fountains, lava cascades, and vigorous lava flows.

Pele’s hair is extremely light, so the wind often carries the fibers high into the air and to places several kilometers away from the vent. It is common to find fibers of Pele’s hair on high places like top of trees, radio antennas, and electric poles.

Pele’s hair does not only occur in Hawaii. It can be found near other volcanoes around the world, for example in Nicaragua (Masaya), Italy (Etna), Ethiopia (Erta’ Ale), and Iceland, where it is known as “nornahár” (“witches’ hair”).[2] It is usually found in gaps in the ground, mostly near vents, skylights, ocean entry, or in corners where Pele’s hair can accumulate.

It is not recommended to touch Pele’s hair, because it is very brittle and very sharp, and small broken pieces can enter the skin. Gloves should be worn while examining it.

For those of you who have sensitive skin you should avoid skin contact with volcanic ash as it will cause an allergic reaction or also called dermatitis , if the volcanic ash already on your skin you should wash your skin with soap and clean water .

Although skin irritation are not always experienced by all people , but if the volcanic ash was mixed with harmful substances you should be careful , because it could be such a dangerous substance that can irritate your skin .

Some of the symptoms that occur to the skin due to volcanic ash

  • The occurrence of red rash on the skin
  • Incidence of red spots on the skin
  • Experiencing skin hives

Some tips to prevent the bad effects of volcanic ash :

  • Use a mask or wet cloth to cover your nose
  • Use goggles to prevent your eyes from volcanic ash
  • You should not wear contact lenses for a while
  • Use eye drops or the like to clean up your eyes
  • Use long sleeves or long pants so that your skin does not come into direct contact with volcanic ash
  • To clean up volcanic ash should be sprayed with water so as not volcanic ash floating .
  • Use a damp cloth to clean the items exposed to dust
  • Wash your skin is exposed to volcanic ash with water and soap
  • When washing cloth or clothing that has been exposed to volcanic ash should be cleaned first before being mixed with other clothing .

THE HEALTH HAZARDS OF VOLCANIC ASH (part 4 Indirect health effects )

THE HEALTH HAZARDS OF VOLCANIC ASH (part 5 What to do to protect yourself against ash)


THE HEALTH HAZARDS OF VOLCANIC ASH

A guide for the public

This   document   has   been   prepared   by   the International  Volcanic  Health  Hazard  Network (IVHHN), Cities and Volcanoes Commission, GNS Science and the United States Geological Survey (USGS)  to  promote  the  safety  of  those  who experience volcanic ashfall. This guide explains the potential health effects of volcanic ash and gives details on how to protect yourself and your family in the event of a volcanic ash fall.

What to do to Protect Yourself Against Ash

Limit Driving

Immediately after an ash fall, even a light one, driving conditions, visibility and air quality can be dramatically
affected, especially by the resuspension of ash by traffic.
Rainfall has a sudden but temporary effect in improving air quality until the ash dries out again. We recommend that, following an ash fall, you refrain from driving and stay indoors if possible. If you must drive, maintain a large distance from the vehicle in front of
you and drive slowly.

Reduce ash in your house

Keep all doors and windows closed whenever possible.

Eye protection

In fine-ash environments, wear goggles or corrective eyeglasses instead of contact lenses to protect eyes from irritation.

Protection

Those undertaking clean-up operations should always wear effective dust masks (see IVHHN Recommended
Masks document at http://www.ivhhn.org). If no approved mask is available, a fabric mask improvised from cloth
will filter out the larger ash particles which may contribute to throat and eye irritation. Dampening
the fabric with water will improve its effectiveness. People with chronic bronchitis, emphysema or asthma
are advised to stay inside and avoid unnecessary exposure to ash.

Drinking Water

After light ash fall it is usually safe to drink water contaminated with ash, but it is better to filter off the
ash particles before drinking. However, ash increases the chlorine requirement in disinfected surface-collected
water which, therefore, can be microbiologically unsafe to drink. Ash will usually make drinking water
unpalatable (sour, metallic or bitter-tasting) before it presents a health risk. The safest way to ensure your well-being is to stock up on water prior to the event. Collect enough drinking water for at least a week (up to one gallon , or 3-4 litres, per person per day). If you rely on collecting rainwater, cover the tank and disconnect any down pipes before ash fall occurs.

Home-grown food

Ash-covered vegetables grown in fields are safe to eat after washing with clean water

Clean Up

Lightly water down the ash deposits before they are removed by shoveling, being careful not to excessively
wet the deposits on roofs, causing excess loading and danger of collapse. Dry brushing can produce very high
exposure levels and should be avoided. Hosing uses large quantities of water and may cause water
shortages in heavily-populated areas.

PROTECT YOURSELF FROM VOLCANIC ASH…


BIG ISLAND LOST AND FOUND PETS ONLY


BIG ISLAND LOST AND FOUND PETS ONLY

We are sending out a “HOLLA” for you to share Please.

We have several Lost and Found pets that need their owners. They were scared and hungry, but now are safe. All organizations are looking for people to Sharing posts with friends and family is #1, volunteering time to help with the pets and offer space in their homes for these pets. Short Stay and Long Stay, permanent and temporary.

Please Contact : https://www.facebook.com/groups/BigIslandLostAndFoundPetsOnly/about/

HELP PUNA STAY STRONG… Animals Need Help…


LINKS FOR FUND RAISERS

EMERGENCY DONATIONS NEEDED FOR HAWAII


JOIN US ON FACEBOOK


JOIN US ON FACEBOOK


Hawaii Lava Flow Animal Rescue

The Hawaiʻi Lava Flow Animal Rescue Network (HLFARN) was created to serve as an informational hub for those needing assistance with pets and animals on farms during the 2018 eruption of Kilauea on the Big Island of Hawaiʻi. But it has become so much more than that. HLFARN has blossomed from a group of strangers into an Ohana; a family of people whose love for animals has taken them into the path of an erupting volcano to rescue pets and farm animals that have been left behind.

https://www.gofundme.com/hlfarn



BIG ISLAND NEEDS HELP WITH THE ANIMALS… PLEASE HELP…


Please check out the GOFUNDME page. https://www.gofundme.com/hlfarn

Orgnat Life Products

The Community and the Shelters are overwhelmed and need your help today.

Hawaii Lava Flow Animal Rescue

The Hawaiʻi Lava Flow Animal Rescue Network (HLFARN) was created to serve as an informational hub for those needing assistance with pets and animals on farms during the 2018 eruption of Kilauea on the Big Island of Hawaiʻi. But it has become so much more than that. HLFARN has blossomed from a group of strangers into an Ohana; a family of people whose love for animals has taken them into the path of an erupting volcano to rescue pets and farm animals that have been left behind.

We are a grassroots movement to help the residents displaced from Leilani Estates and lower Puna to evacuate their beloved companions and friends. As a group of volunteers, we have rescued over 200 animals thus far. We continue to help residents, their furry friends, and…

View original post 222 more words

SAMPLING… BIG ISLAND HAWAII Air Quality Is Questionable. How much are they really NOT telling us.


SAMPLING… Air Quality Is Questionable.

How much are they really NOT telling us.

This is what I was greeted with this morning.

The STRANGEST SMELL came over Hawaiian Paradise Park and Orchidland at 9:30 am this morning as these wispy strange looking clouds came over. I called my friend Lisa ask her if she smells a strange odor. Yes i smell that also.Then about 10:00 am military plane shows up going through all these clouds back and forth. I call my friend Lisa to tell her to look she is up mountain from me. she says yes i see. My face and lips were stinging when I came back in. The plane kept coming again and again. Don’t know what it was, but it made me cough and my skin is itchy too.

They keep down Playing the PGV (Puna Geothermal Venture Plant) facts. Those facts could kill the whole community in Puna district and then some. They really have no idea. It depends on a lot of factors: wind speed, cloud formation, height and weight, time of day, Day Or Night . So many factors and a lot of people are acting like “it’s all good, I got this”… “Do you really got this”.?

YOU COULD SAY THIS IS A REAL CLIFF HANGER…


What is happening to our Earth, Our Home…?

Tragic events keep afflicting our planet, our home.

 

Are these the new weather arrangements for the future.

Is this this final`e for our planet?

The last whooorahhhh?

Our rapid destruction, our tragic end.

We sometimes think the change is rapid when it is time that has worn out the soles of our planet. The abuse that humans have inflicted upon this great earth we call home. A Great Chapter I see as closing before our very eyes.

 

Filmed January 23, 2016 around 10:45am PST.

SAY GOODBYE… Homes Fall Into Ocean In Pacifica Beach, Drone footage reveals erosion on Pacifica Coast, California.

San Francisco is falling apart at the ocean seams. Cliffside neighborhood in Pacifica that is threatened by erosion.

Esplanade Avenue in the San Francisco suburb are teetering on the cliff’s edge as other portions of the bluff appear to have disintegrated into the crashing waves below.


 


 


 

The coastal land loss of Jean Lafitte


CHEM – TRAILS OVER BIG ISLAND HAWAII AS VOLCANO IS ERUPTING.


May 21, 2018  I Can’t Believe My Eyes…

Funny How we have Military Exercises at Mauna Kea and we have a Volcano Eruption and now Chem-trails. Between the Volcano letting steam off, fissure 17 has bad gas and 20 is non stop and NOW the BIG BOYS flying last night and again this morning. This is what I ended up with this morning.

The Big Boy was high in the air, right into the sun…

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

UPDATE: KEEP YOUR WINDOWS OPEN AND THE POLLUTION OUT… Home Made Window Filters.


***UPDATE AT BOTTOM***

WARNING: This only filters low smoke and ash.

*DOES NOT* filter out (So2) Sulfur Dioxide, chemicals, gases or heavy smoke/ ash.

Needs To Be Used With A Fan, (Box / Square fan is best). At this point what ever you have will work. I am using a small VORNADO 40 and it is pulling cool air in just fine.

YOU NEED TO MEASURE YOUR WINDOWS OR DOORWAYS.

Head on over to the hardware store near you and pick up your HVAC AIR REPLACEMENT FILTERS, Duct Tape and a cutting utility knife (if you don’t have one)..

I bought the #9 rated filter. That was the highest rated the store had.

Actually the store was pretty empty as far as supplies goes. Plenty of people wanting and looking for solutions. I also wanted a indoor air conditioner and came up empty handed for those. Home Depot Hilo, Hawaii would not sell the floor models. Don’t understand their problem on that during a crisis. Sell what ever you can to the people is my motto.

Any how!!! Back to our important project…

  • Remove the filters from the plastic and lay the filters on a solid surface. I used the kitchen floor.
  • Tape each seam of the two filters together.
  • Make sure to over lap other side by 1″ inch.
  • Tape all the seams and flip over and tape .

 

 

 

If you come up short by a couple of inches, you can cut a piece of cardboard and add it to the top with duct tape to the filter paper surface.

 

 

 

 

 

I did a couple larger than the opening and the fit was great that way also. This one filled up the entire window ledge opening. It is held by the shampoo bottle.

OK HAD TO ADD 2 PIECES WOOD TO STURDY UP THE FILTERS FOR THE SLIDER DOOR.

 

The wind blew hard and it bent. So I put a 1″x 2″ on each side and duct taped the wood to each side and then went across at the seams of filter connections with tape on both sides.

 

 

 

 

 

 

See how easy it is to protect yourself from minor pollutants…

***Just remember this is protection from Light smoke and ash only!!!***

You can also use this in a car or truck window if you are displaced by the volcano eruption.

 

WARNING: Possible Explosions From Kilauea Volcano…??? HVO REPORTS


HVO/USGS Volcanic Activity Notice MAY 9, 2018

Volcano: Kilauea (VNUM #332010)

Current Volcano Alert Level: WARNING

Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Issued: Wednesday, May 9, 2018, 8:02 AM HST
Source: Hawaiian Volcano Observatory
Notice Number:
Location: N 19 deg 25 min W 155 deg 17 min
Elevation: 4091 ft (1247 m)
Area: Hawaii

Volcanic Activity Summary: The steady lowering of the lava lake in “Overlook crater” within Halemaʻumaʻu at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano has raised the potential for explosive eruptions in the coming weeks. If the lava column drops to the level of groundwater beneath Kīlauea Caldera, influx of water into the conduit could cause steam-driven explosions. Debris expelled during such explosions could impact the area surrounding Halemaʻumaʻu and the Kīlauea summit. At this time, we cannot say with certainty that explosive activity will occur, how large the explosions could be, or how long such explosive activity could continue.

Residents of the Kīlauea summit area should learn about the hazards of ashfall, stay informed of the status of the volcano and area closures, and review family and business emergency plans.

Resource on volcanic ash hazards: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanic_ash/

She has emptied below water level NOW

Remarks: HAZARDS

Primary hazards of concern should this activity occur are ballistic projectiles and ashfall.

BALLISTIC PROJECTILES
During steam-driven explosions, ballistic blocks up to 2 m (yards) across could be thrown in all directions to a distance of 1 km (0.6 miles) or more. These blocks could weigh a few kilograms (pounds) to several tons.

Smaller (pebble-size) rocks could be sent several kilometers (miles) from Halemaʻumaʻu, mostly in a downwind direction.

ASHFALL
Presently, during the drawdown of the lava column, rockfalls from the steep enclosing walls of the Overlook crater vent impact the lake and produce small ash clouds. These clouds are very dilute and result in dustings of ash (particles smaller than 2 mm) downwind.

Should steam-driven explosions begin, ash clouds will rise to greater elevations above ground. Minor ashfall could occur over much wider areas, even up to several tens of miles from Halemaʻumaʻu. In 1924, ash may have reached as high as 20,000 feet above sea level. Small amounts of fine ash from these explosions fell over a wide area as far north as North Hilo (Hakalau), in lower Puna, and as far south as Waiohinu.

GAS
Gas emitted during steam-drive explosions will be mainly steam, but will include some sulfur dioxide (SO2) as well. Currently, SO2 emissions remain elevated.

WARNING TIME

Steam-driven explosions at volcanoes typically provide very little warning. Once the lava level reaches the groundwater elevation, onset of continuous ashy plumes or a sequence of violent steam-driven explosions may be the first sign that activity of concern has commenced.

BACKGROUND

Kīlauea’s lava lake began to drop on May 2, 2018. From its peak on May 2 to the most recent measurement at 9 pm on May 6, the lava lake surface dropped a total of more than 200 m (656 ft). The subsidence was at a relatively constant rate of about 2 meters (yards) per hour.

Measurements of subsidence have not been possible since May 6 because of thick fume and the increasing depth to the lava surface. However, thermal images indicate continued lowering of the lake surface since that time, consistent with deflationary tilt recorded at Kīlauea’s summit. Therefore, we infer that the lake surface continues to drop at roughly the same rate. So, while HVO cannot report exact depths of the receding lava lake, we can monitor the overall trend.

USGS and HVO scientists are monitoring changes at the summit 24/7 and watching for signs that hazardous conditions have increased, or may increase. HVO is working closely with Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park and Hawai’i County Civil Defense to respond to this situation.

FOR MORE INFORMATION

Updates on activity will be posted on the HVO website at https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/status.html

You can receive these updates by email through a free subscription service: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/vns2/

Hawai’i County Civil Defense will issue its own hazard notices should that become necessary: http://www.hawaiicounty.gov/active-alerts/

Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park status is posted on their web page:
https://www.nps.gov/havo/index.htm

Resources on volcanic ash can be found at:
https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanic_ash/

Contacts: askHVO@usgs.gov

Next Notice: Daily updates on all volcanic activity at Kīlauea are issued each morning and posted on out website: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/status.html

You can sign up to receive these messages automatically by visiting https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/vns2/

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory is one of five volcano observatories within the U.S. Geological Survey and is responsible for monitoring volcanoes and earthquakes in Hawai`i.

Dynamic Illustration of Kilauea Seismicity and Eruption of 2018 May 6


Dynamic Illustration of Kilauea Seismicity and Eruption of 2018

Returning home is a scary feeling when you don’t know what to expect.


Lava Insurance too expensive for most islanders…


Specialty insurance, added extras… These days those are typical words homeowners are hearing from the insurance companies. Time to have a “CHECK UP” on your homeowners insurance policy. Make sure you are covered for what you “THINK” you are covered for. Better to find out before something happens.

35 Homes Destroyed and 2 new Fissures open in LEILANI ESTATES… Disaster Grows!!!


Disaster looms for many residents of a subdivision in Hawaii. It seems every hour you hear the lava has consumed another house in Leilani Estates on the Big Island of Hawaii. Residents are growing restless not knowing if their house has joined the list of  the others that have been destroyed by Pele. Locals say she is reclaiming the land.

RISING FROM THE VOG… Leilani Estates Eruption 2018 Residents return to get their pets


A line of traffic is seen going towards Pahoa town, Sunday, May 6, 2018, near Pahoa, Hawaii. Scientists reported lava spewing more than 200 feet (61 meters) into the air in Hawaii’s recent Kilauea volcanic eruption, and some of the more than 1,700 people who evacuated prepared for the possibility they may not return for quite some time. (AP Photo/Marco Garcia)

May 6, 2018 7 am cars lined the street hoping for a chance to retrieve their animals and belongings. “Lookie Loos” lined up also at the gateway entrance to the homes that have been evacuated since May 3, 2018.

As the morning progressed into lunch time, so did the lines. Growing ever longer down both sides of the highway. Residents patiently waiting their turn to go to their homes. The County and Police notified everyone in the lines that “RESIDENTS ONLY” would be allowed in. The lines slimmed down a bit, but continued till 6pm when all residents had to leave the area for mandatory curfew.

Hawaii Volcano Eruption Update – Sunday Morning (May 6, 2018)

A few minutes prior to curfew the Civil Defense put out “EMERGENCY BROADCAST” to ALL Leilani Estates residents to “GO NOW”. CDC did not say why, but I am assuming it was the Sulfur Dioxide Levels, possibly to high for human safety.

Leilani Estates eruption area should had been restricted to residents only or escorted by residents ONLY. What took them so long to come to that realization. The residents are still evacuating. Some Residents that were able to get to their homes today, came back to their homes that had been broken into and things were stolen.

The residents have had people approach them and TRESPASS on their property asking if they could look at the lava and take pictures.. Disrespecting the property owners who are mourning the loss of their homes, property and possibly animals… All for a photo opportunity that will make the trespassers money and famous for a second.

 

Hawaii Volcano Eruption Update – Sunday Morning (May 7, 2018)

VOLCANO ERUPTION MAY 3, 2018 10:30AM BIG ISLAND OF HAWAII


VOLCANO ERUPTION MAY 3, 2018 10:30AM.

FEATHERY LOOKING CLOUDS SURROUNDED ABOVE ME AND FORMED THIS BIRD LOOKING CLOUD.

Hey!!! This is what I was treated to the morning of the eruption. This image transformed over my head / property as the 10:30 earthquake hit. It was amazing to me and that is why i took still photos. Just amazing what I see sometimes. One by one the clouds came above me and within 5 minutes this appeared. GOD protects those who believe in the higher powers of life. You are all welcome to comment. Please SHARE with your friends.

 PROTECT YOUR ANIMALS DURING TIMES OF ANXIETY.

ANXIETY WRAPS

The Aftermath of Tragedy, not just once but twice.


DONATE TO THE AMERICAN RED CROSS TODAY

The Aftermath of Tragedy, not just once but twice.

As we start to see enormous changes in our weather more disasters are bound to happen.

In the past few weeks we have seen mother nature roar her ugly head and destroy city after city. Millions are displaced and left without homes that were in the path of Harvey And Irma. In the midst of the hurricanes comes the earthquake and tropical storm to hit Mexico.

 

The damages are in the billions.

Recovery starts here.

Donate $1 and share this with yours friends and family.

We can and will re-build.

DONATE TODAY

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How to Open a Can of food in an Emergency


How to Open a Can of food in an Emergency

It’s 411 to your 911 situations. Getting stuck without a can opener is no problem when you know this little life hack survival trick. In minutes you can be enjoying your ravioli or tuna sandwich. It’s no joke when you are hungry and you forgot to put a can opener in your gear.

First video shows you how to open the can with a spoon. I tried this and it works. You might want to wear a pair of garden gloves to cushion your hand. Be very careful of sharp edges. Quarter way through the can I was really missing my P38 opener….

Get the Best… Flashlights that will last through the storm

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qyw1qagL25s

Remember to stay calm in all emergency situations so you can think rationally. Make sure you have an emergency bag in your home and all vehicles. Check out our list of what you need in case of a disaster.

You don’t want to be caught by surprise in a disaster. Make sure you have at least the basic items. Flashlight, Battery-powered or hand-crank radio (NOAA Weather Radio, if possible), Extra batteries, First aid kit, Medications (7-day supply), Multi-purpose tool
Sanitation and personal hygiene items, Copies of personal documents (medication list and pertinent medical information, proof of address, deed/lease to home, passports, birth certificates, insurance policies), Cell phone with chargers, Family and emergency contact information and good old Extra cash. Not your ATM or credit cards the machines may not be working.

Second video shows you how to open a can on the concrete. For me being a woman and older this was easier than the spoon trick.

It is always better to be prepared ahead of time.

Today we showed you two ways to open a can of food in case you can’t find your “John Wayne”. I always keep a “John Wayne”, P38 (military can opener) on my key ring, in the glove box of my car and a few in my survival gear. You do not want to starve while you wait out the disaster.

Get the Best… Flashlights that will last through the storm

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World’s Largest Wave Was 62.3-Foot Surge in Atlantic: Scientists


wave-map

The largest wave ever recorded was a six-story monster in the North Atlantic Ocean, scientists have revealed.

A World Meteorological Organization (WMO) expert committee found data from a buoy between Iceland and the U.K.

Scientists attributed the 62.3-foot surge to a “very strong cold front, which produced winds of up to 43.8 knots [50.4 miles per hour] over the area” on Feb. 4, 2013.

The previous record of 59.96 feet was measured on December 8, 2007, also in the North Atlantic.

The WMO Commission for Climatology’s Extremes Evaluation Committee classified it as “the highest significant wave height as measured by a buoy.”

The committee consisted of scientists from Great Britain, Canada, the U.S. and Spain.

54 FT wave North Shore Oahu, Hawaii
54 FT wave North Shore Oahu, Hawaii

“This is the first time we have ever measured a wave of 19 meters. It is a remarkable record,” WMO Assistant Secretary-General Wenjian Zhang said. “It highlights the importance of meteorological and ocean observations and forecasts to ensure the safety of the global maritime industry and to protect the lives of crew and passengers on busy shipping lanes.”

Wave height is defined as the distance from the crest of one wave to the trough of the next. The highest waves typically occur in the North Atlantic, because wind circulation patterns and atmospheric pressure in winter leads to intense extra-tropical storms.


Waves are created by wind energy being transferred onto the water. Large waves occur when strong winds hit the ocean and then the water travels over large distances, growing in size.

Because of this, the area from the Grand Banks underwater plateaus off the Canadian coast around Newfoundland to south of Iceland and to the west coast of the U.K. are prime locations for giant waves.

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WARNING: Hawaiian residents “FISHING THE WATERS”


WARNING: Hawaiian residents “FISHING THE WATERS”

Fukushima reaches US shores. #4

An energy map provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) shows the intensity of the tsunami in the Pacific Ocean caused by the magnitude 8.9 earthquake which struck Japan on March 11, 2011.
An energy map provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) shows the intensity of the tsunami in the Pacific Ocean caused by the magnitude 8.9 earthquake which struck Japan on March 11, 2011.

On 5 July 2012, the Japanese National Diet-appointed Fukushima Nuclear Accident Independent Investigation Commission (NAIIC) submitted its inquiry report to the Japanese Diet.[40] The Commission found the nuclear disaster was “manmade”, that the direct causes of the accident were all foreseeable prior to 11 March 2011. The report also found that the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant was incapable of withstanding the earthquake and tsunami. TEPCO, the regulatory bodies (NISA and NSC) and the government body promoting the nuclear power industry (METI), all failed to correctly develop the most basic safety requirements—such as assessing the probability of damage, preparing for containing collateral damage from such a disaster, and developing evacuation plans for the public in the case of a serious radiation release. Meanwhile, the government-appointed Investigation Committee on the Accident at the Fukushima Nuclear Power Stations of Tokyo Electric Power Company submitted its final report to the Japanese government on 23 July 2012.[41] A separate study by Stanford researchers found that Japanese plants operated by the largest utility companies were particularly unprotected against potential tsunami.[6]

TEPCO admitted for the first time on 12 October 2012 that it had failed to take stronger measures to prevent disasters for fear of inviting lawsuits or protests against its nuclear plants.[7][8][9][10] There are no clear plans for decommissioning the plant, but the plant management estimate is thirty or forty years.[17] A frozen soil barrier is being constructed in order to prevent ongoing exposure of running groundwater with melted down nuclear fuel.[18]

glowing-fish

In 2013, the World Health Organization (WHO) indicated that the residents of the area who were evacuated were exposed to low amounts of radiation and that radiation-induced health impacts are likely to be low.[31][32] In particular, the 2013 WHO report predicts that for evacuated infant girls, their 0.75% pre-accident lifetime risk of developing thyroid cancer is calculated to be increased to 1.25% by being exposed to radioiodine, with the increase being slightly less for males.

 

The risks from a number of additional radiation-induced cancers are also expected to be elevated due to exposure caused by the other low boiling point fission products that were released by the safety failures. The single greatest increase is for thyroid cancer, but in total, an overall 1% higher lifetime risk of developing cancers of all types, is predicted for infant females, with the risk slightly lower for males, making both some of the most radiation-sensitive groups.[32] Along with those within the womb, which the WHO predicted, depending on their gender, to have the same elevations in risk as the infant groups.[33]

A screening program a year later in 2012 found that more than a third (36%) of children in Fukushima Prefecture have abnormal growths in their thyroid glands.[34] As of August 2013, there have been more than 40 children newly diagnosed with thyroid cancer and other cancers in Fukushima prefecture as a whole.

In 2015, the number of thyroid cancers or detections of developing thyroid cancers numbered 137.[35] However whether these incidences of cancer are elevated above the rate in un-contaminated areas and therefore were due to exposure to nuclear radiation is unknown at this stage.

caution-radiation

Data from the Chernobyl accident showed that an unmistakable rise in thyroid cancer rates following the disaster in 1986 only began after a cancer incubation period of 3–5 years,[36] however whether this data can be directly compared to the Fukushima nuclear disaster is still yet to be determined.[37]

A survey by the newspaper Mainichi Shimbun computed that of some 300,000 people who evacuated the area, approximately 1,600 deaths related to the evacuation conditions, such as living in temporary housing and hospital closures have occurred as of August 2013, a number comparable to the 1,599 deaths directly caused by the earthquake and tsunami in the Fukushima Prefecture in 2011. With the exact cause of the majority of these evacuation related deaths not being specified, as according to the municipalities, that would hinder application for condolence money compensation[38][39] by the relatives of the deceased.

Do you Know what to pack for a disaster?

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What you Need to Survive a Disaster


LEARN CPR
LEARN CPR

Be Prepared for an Emergency.

Being prepared means being equipped with the proper supplies you may need in the event of an emergency or disaster. Keep your supplies in an easy-to-carry emergency preparedness kit that you can use at home or take with you in case you must evacuate.
At a minimum, you should have the basic supplies listed below:

first-aid-chart-for-survival
first-aid-chart-for-survival

 

Water: one gallon per person, per day (3-day supply for evacuation, 2-week supply for home)
Food: non-perishable, easy-to-prepare items (3-day supply for evacuation, 2-week supply for home).
Flashlight [Available on the Red Cross Store]
Battery-powered or hand-crank radio (NOAA Weather Radio, if possible) [Available on the Red Cross Store]
Extra batteries
First aid kit [Available on the Red Cross Store]
Medications (7-day supply) and medical items
Multi-purpose tool
Sanitation and personal hygiene items
Copies of personal documents (medication list and pertinent medical information, proof of address, deed/lease to home, passports, birth certificates, insurance policies)
Cell phone with chargers
Family and emergency contact information
Extra cash
Emergency blanket [Available on the Red Cross Store]
Map(s) of the area
Get Prepared this Season
Consider the needs of all family members and add supplies to your kit. Suggested items to help meet additional needs are:Medical supplies (hearing aids with extra batteries, glasses, contact lenses, syringes, etc)
Baby supplies (bottles, formula, baby food, diapers)
Games and activities for children
Pet supplies (collar, leash, ID, food, carrier, bowl)
Two-way radios
Extra set of car keys and house keys
Manual can opener
Additional supplies to keep at home or in your survival kit based on the types of disasters common to your area:Whistle
N95 or surgical masks
Matches

Rain gear
Towels
Work gloves
Tools/supplies for securing your home
Extra clothing, hat and sturdy shoes
Plastic sheeting
Duct tape
Scissors
Household liquid bleach
Entertainment items
Blankets, pillows, sheets

Healthy Choices For A Healthy Lifestyle