Tag Archives: may2018volcanoeruption

Rockfall generates a short-lived explosion at Halema‘uma‘u crater


Rockfall generates a short-lived explosion at Halema‘uma‘u crater, at 8:27 a.m. HST, May 9.

An ash column rises from the Overlook crater at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano today. The USGS-Hawaiian Volcano Observatory’s interpretation is that the explosion was triggered by a rockfall from the steep walls of Overlook crater.

The summit lava lake level has dropped about 220 m (722 ft) below the crater rim from April 30-May 7. The water table is about 460m (1970 ft) below the caldera floor. This explosion was due to a rockfall and not the interaction of magma with the water table.

This photograph was taken at 8:29 a.m. HST on May 9, from the Jaggar Museum overlook. The explosion was short-lived. Geologists examining the ash deposits on the rim of Halema‘uma‘u crater found fresh lava fragments hurled from the lava lake. This explosion was not caused by the interaction of the lava lake with the water table. When the ash cleared from the crater about an hour after the explosion, geologists were able to observe the lava lake surface, which is still above the water table.

#usgs #hvo #hawaiianvolcanoobservatory #kilauea #volcano #PuuOo #KilaueaErupts #LeilaniEstatesEruption #leilaniestates

WARNING: Possible Explosions From Kilauea Volcano…??? HVO REPORTS


HVO/USGS Volcanic Activity Notice MAY 9, 2018

Volcano: Kilauea (VNUM #332010)

Current Volcano Alert Level: WARNING

Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Issued: Wednesday, May 9, 2018, 8:02 AM HST
Source: Hawaiian Volcano Observatory
Notice Number:
Location: N 19 deg 25 min W 155 deg 17 min
Elevation: 4091 ft (1247 m)
Area: Hawaii

Volcanic Activity Summary: The steady lowering of the lava lake in “Overlook crater” within Halemaʻumaʻu at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano has raised the potential for explosive eruptions in the coming weeks. If the lava column drops to the level of groundwater beneath Kīlauea Caldera, influx of water into the conduit could cause steam-driven explosions. Debris expelled during such explosions could impact the area surrounding Halemaʻumaʻu and the Kīlauea summit. At this time, we cannot say with certainty that explosive activity will occur, how large the explosions could be, or how long such explosive activity could continue.

Residents of the Kīlauea summit area should learn about the hazards of ashfall, stay informed of the status of the volcano and area closures, and review family and business emergency plans.

Resource on volcanic ash hazards: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanic_ash/

She has emptied below water level NOW

Remarks: HAZARDS

Primary hazards of concern should this activity occur are ballistic projectiles and ashfall.

BALLISTIC PROJECTILES
During steam-driven explosions, ballistic blocks up to 2 m (yards) across could be thrown in all directions to a distance of 1 km (0.6 miles) or more. These blocks could weigh a few kilograms (pounds) to several tons.

Smaller (pebble-size) rocks could be sent several kilometers (miles) from Halemaʻumaʻu, mostly in a downwind direction.

ASHFALL
Presently, during the drawdown of the lava column, rockfalls from the steep enclosing walls of the Overlook crater vent impact the lake and produce small ash clouds. These clouds are very dilute and result in dustings of ash (particles smaller than 2 mm) downwind.

Should steam-driven explosions begin, ash clouds will rise to greater elevations above ground. Minor ashfall could occur over much wider areas, even up to several tens of miles from Halemaʻumaʻu. In 1924, ash may have reached as high as 20,000 feet above sea level. Small amounts of fine ash from these explosions fell over a wide area as far north as North Hilo (Hakalau), in lower Puna, and as far south as Waiohinu.

GAS
Gas emitted during steam-drive explosions will be mainly steam, but will include some sulfur dioxide (SO2) as well. Currently, SO2 emissions remain elevated.

WARNING TIME

Steam-driven explosions at volcanoes typically provide very little warning. Once the lava level reaches the groundwater elevation, onset of continuous ashy plumes or a sequence of violent steam-driven explosions may be the first sign that activity of concern has commenced.

BACKGROUND

Kīlauea’s lava lake began to drop on May 2, 2018. From its peak on May 2 to the most recent measurement at 9 pm on May 6, the lava lake surface dropped a total of more than 200 m (656 ft). The subsidence was at a relatively constant rate of about 2 meters (yards) per hour.

Measurements of subsidence have not been possible since May 6 because of thick fume and the increasing depth to the lava surface. However, thermal images indicate continued lowering of the lake surface since that time, consistent with deflationary tilt recorded at Kīlauea’s summit. Therefore, we infer that the lake surface continues to drop at roughly the same rate. So, while HVO cannot report exact depths of the receding lava lake, we can monitor the overall trend.

USGS and HVO scientists are monitoring changes at the summit 24/7 and watching for signs that hazardous conditions have increased, or may increase. HVO is working closely with Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park and Hawai’i County Civil Defense to respond to this situation.

FOR MORE INFORMATION

Updates on activity will be posted on the HVO website at https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/status.html

You can receive these updates by email through a free subscription service: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/vns2/

Hawai’i County Civil Defense will issue its own hazard notices should that become necessary: http://www.hawaiicounty.gov/active-alerts/

Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park status is posted on their web page:
https://www.nps.gov/havo/index.htm

Resources on volcanic ash can be found at:
https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanic_ash/

Contacts: askHVO@usgs.gov

Next Notice: Daily updates on all volcanic activity at Kīlauea are issued each morning and posted on out website: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/status.html

You can sign up to receive these messages automatically by visiting https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/vns2/

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory is one of five volcano observatories within the U.S. Geological Survey and is responsible for monitoring volcanoes and earthquakes in Hawai`i.

Dynamic Illustration of Kilauea Seismicity and Eruption of 2018 May 6


Dynamic Illustration of Kilauea Seismicity and Eruption of 2018

Returning home is a scary feeling when you don’t know what to expect.


Lava Insurance too expensive for most islanders…


Specialty insurance, added extras… These days those are typical words homeowners are hearing from the insurance companies. Time to have a “CHECK UP” on your homeowners insurance policy. Make sure you are covered for what you “THINK” you are covered for. Better to find out before something happens.

35 Homes Destroyed and 2 new Fissures open in LEILANI ESTATES… Disaster Grows!!!


Disaster looms for many residents of a subdivision in Hawaii. It seems every hour you hear the lava has consumed another house in Leilani Estates on the Big Island of Hawaii. Residents are growing restless not knowing if their house has joined the list of  the others that have been destroyed by Pele. Locals say she is reclaiming the land.

RISING FROM THE VOG… Leilani Estates Eruption 2018 Residents return to get their pets


A line of traffic is seen going towards Pahoa town, Sunday, May 6, 2018, near Pahoa, Hawaii. Scientists reported lava spewing more than 200 feet (61 meters) into the air in Hawaii’s recent Kilauea volcanic eruption, and some of the more than 1,700 people who evacuated prepared for the possibility they may not return for quite some time. (AP Photo/Marco Garcia)

May 6, 2018 7 am cars lined the street hoping for a chance to retrieve their animals and belongings. “Lookie Loos” lined up also at the gateway entrance to the homes that have been evacuated since May 3, 2018.

As the morning progressed into lunch time, so did the lines. Growing ever longer down both sides of the highway. Residents patiently waiting their turn to go to their homes. The County and Police notified everyone in the lines that “RESIDENTS ONLY” would be allowed in. The lines slimmed down a bit, but continued till 6pm when all residents had to leave the area for mandatory curfew.

Hawaii Volcano Eruption Update – Sunday Morning (May 6, 2018)

A few minutes prior to curfew the Civil Defense put out “EMERGENCY BROADCAST” to ALL Leilani Estates residents to “GO NOW”. CDC did not say why, but I am assuming it was the Sulfur Dioxide Levels, possibly to high for human safety.

Leilani Estates eruption area should had been restricted to residents only or escorted by residents ONLY. What took them so long to come to that realization. The residents are still evacuating. Some Residents that were able to get to their homes today, came back to their homes that had been broken into and things were stolen.

The residents have had people approach them and TRESPASS on their property asking if they could look at the lava and take pictures.. Disrespecting the property owners who are mourning the loss of their homes, property and possibly animals… All for a photo opportunity that will make the trespassers money and famous for a second.

 

Hawaii Volcano Eruption Update – Sunday Morning (May 7, 2018)

VOLCANO ERUPTION MAY 3, 2018 10:30AM BIG ISLAND OF HAWAII


VOLCANO ERUPTION MAY 3, 2018 10:30AM.

FEATHERY LOOKING CLOUDS SURROUNDED ABOVE ME AND FORMED THIS BIRD LOOKING CLOUD.

Hey!!! This is what I was treated to the morning of the eruption. This image transformed over my head / property as the 10:30 earthquake hit. It was amazing to me and that is why i took still photos. Just amazing what I see sometimes. One by one the clouds came above me and within 5 minutes this appeared. GOD protects those who believe in the higher powers of life. You are all welcome to comment. Please SHARE with your friends.

 PROTECT YOUR ANIMALS DURING TIMES OF ANXIETY.

ANXIETY WRAPS