Tag Archives: healthy food

HOMEMADE TAMALES, STEP BY STEP


HOMEMADE TAMALES, STEP BY STEP

https://orgnatlife.com/2021/01/10/homemade-tamales-step-by-step/
— Read on orgnatlife.com/2021/01/10/homemade-tamales-step-by-step/

5 Best Sugar Substitutes to Replace Processed Sugar and High Fructose Corn Syrup


Best Sugar Substitutes to Replace Processed Sugar Do you know what the best Sugar Substitutes to Replace Processed Sugar are? If you are trying to …

5 Best Sugar Substitutes to Replace Processed Sugar and High Fructose Corn Syrup

Dr. Becker’s Bites


https://drbeckersbites.com/

We are excited to introduce Dr. Becker’s Forever Dog Bites. This unique one-of-a-kind treat was crafted by years of research that can be found in the newly released book, “The Forever Dog.”

Sloppy Joe’s


We are using spices and veggies instead of ketchup to flavor our yummy kid friendly and adult pleasing yummy homemade sloppy joes. No preservatives.

Add 1/4 of each green, red and yellow peppers 🫑 cut up into your choice of size and 1 onion. If your making this for kid’s you may want to dice the peppers and onion’s into very small pieces. I like 1” inch piece’s for adults. You can also purée in the blender for a smoother texture.

While the meat 🥩 is cooking cut up your veggies 🥗 and onions 🧅 .. Cook your meat 🥩 down and drain the grease.

Add your onion 🧅 and 🫑 peppers. Add 1 teaspoon salt.

Add 2 Teaspoons of garlic. I use 2 of the frozen 5 gram cubes. ( 1 Teaspoon each cube ). Continue cooking

Cook down until soft and onion’s are translucent.

  • 1 pound Hamburger
  • 1 teaspoon Salt
  • 1 tablespoon White Sugar
  • 1 teaspoon Celery Salt
  • 1/2 cup Brown Sugar
  • 1 tablepoon All Spice
  • 1 can Tomato Paste 6 oz
  • 1 1/2 cups Water

Adding water 1/2 cup at a time. Mix it up until all the water is gone.

Simmer for 45 minutes

You can adjust the serving size by increasing all the ingredients. This makes approximately 6 to 8 sandwiches.

Yummy ready to go

I toasted some fresh baked garlic pepper Jack cheese bread. It paired wonderfully. So buns for the kids and add cheese or a different bread for the adults.

Enjoy

COOKING 101: ULTIMATE LOW SUGAR BANANA NUT BREAD


When I say ULTIMATE I mean only 3/4 cup Brown Sugar and NO vegetable oil.

ULTIMATE LOW SUGAR BANANA NUT BREAD

This recipe is the best banana nut bread I have tested lately. In the past year I have made 11 banana nut bread recipes.

This recipe is so full of natural flavor without all the sugar. You can taste the hint of cinnamon and vanilla.

There is no Rancid vegetable oil in this recipe either. I am switching out all vegetable oils for animal fat rich butter, lard and what ever else I can try.

This is a very dense, but fluffy quick bread

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Prep Time: 20 to 30 minutes
Cook Time: 60 to 65 minutes
Total Time: 95 minutes
Yield: 8 servings +
Skill Level: Beginner / Easy
Kitchen Appliance: Food Processor, Mixer or by hand and Oven

Ingredients

  • 2 cups all-purpose flour or what ever flour you want to use
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, softened to room temperature
  • 3/4 cup packed light or dark brown sugar
  • 2 large eggs, at room temperature
  • 1/3 cup plain sour cream
  • 2 cups mashed bananas (about 4 large ripe bananas)
  • 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
  • optional: 3/4 cup (100g) chopped pecans or walnuts

Instructions

  • Adjust the oven rack to the lower third position and preheat the oven to 350°F (177°C).
  • Grease a 9×5-inch loaf pan. Set aside.
  • Whisk or stir the flour, baking soda, salt, and cinnamon together in a large bowl.
  • Using a mixer, whisk or a really good spoon, cream the butter and brown sugar together until smooth and creamy, about 4 minutes.
  • Add the eggs one at a time, stirring well after each addition.
  • Stir in the yogurt, mashed bananas, and vanilla extract on medium speed until combined.
  • Slowly mix the wet ingredients into the dry ingredients until no flour pockets remain.
  • Do not overmix.
  • Fold in the nuts, if using.
  • Spoon the batter into the prepared baking pan and bake for 60-65 minutes.
  • Loosely cover the bread with aluminum foil after 30 minutes to help prevent the top and sides from getting too brown.
  • A toothpick inserted in the center of the loaf will come out clean when the bread is done.
  • Remove from the oven and allow the bread to cool completely in the pan set on a wire rack.
  • Cover and store banana bread at room temperature for 2 days or in the refrigerator for up to 1 week.
  • Banana bread tastes best on day 2 after the flavors have settled together.

You can finish this recipe off with butter, cream cheese frosting or Ice Cream.

Bon Appetit` ENJOY!!!

DASH DIET, Needs More Research, What’s your opinion?


healthlife-sign

SOURCED FROM: MAYO CLINIC, Wikipedia

IS THIS DIET HEART SMART?

DASH DIET:  MAYO CLINIC reports healthy eating to lower your blood pressure.
The DASH diet emphasizes the right portion sizes, variety of foods and nutrients. Discover how DASH can improve your health and lower your blood pressure.

DASH stands for Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension. The DASH diet is a lifelong approach to healthy eating that’s designed to help treat or prevent high blood pressure (hypertension). The DASH diet plan was developed to lower blood pressure without medication in research sponsored by the National Institutes of Health.

The DASH diet encourages you to reduce the sodium in your diet and eat a variety of foods rich in nutrients that help lower blood pressure, such as potassium, calcium and magnesium.
By following the DASH diet, you may be able to reduce your blood pressure by a few points in just two weeks. Over time, the top number of your blood pressure (systolic blood pressure) could drop by eight to 14 points, which can make a significant difference in your health risks.
Because the DASH diet is a healthy way of eating, it offers health benefits besides just lowering blood pressure. The DASH diet is also in line with dietary recommendations to prevent osteoporosis, cancer, heart disease, stroke and diabetes.
DASH diet: Sodium levels

The DASH diet emphasizes vegetables, fruits and low-fat dairy foods — and moderate amounts of whole grains, fish, poultry and nuts.
In addition to the standard DASH diet, there is also a lower sodium version of the diet. You can choose the version of the diet that meets your health needs:

Standard DASH diet. You can consume up to 2,300 milligrams (mg) of sodium a day.
Lower sodium DASH diet. You can consume up to 1,500 mg of sodium a day.
Both versions of the DASH diet aim to reduce the amount of sodium in your diet compared with what you might get in a typical American diet, which can amount to a whopping 3,400 mg of sodium a day or more.
The standard DASH diet meets the recommendation from the Dietary Guidelines for Americans to keep daily sodium intake to less than 2,300 mg a day.
The American Heart Association recommends 1,500 mg a day of sodium as an upper limit for all adults. If you aren’t sure what sodium level is right for you, talk to your doctor.
DASH diet: What to eat

Both versions of the DASH diet include lots of whole grains, fruits, vegetables and low-fat dairy products. The DASH diet also includes some fish, poultry and legumes, and encourages a small amount of nuts and seeds a few times a week.

You can eat red meat, sweets and fats in small amounts. The DASH diet is low in saturated fat, trans fat and total fat.
Here’s a look at the recommended servings from each food group for the 2,000-calorie-a-day DASH diet.
Grains: 6 to 8 servings a day
Grains include bread, cereal, rice and pasta. Examples of one serving of grains include 1 slice whole-wheat bread, 1 ounce dry cereal, or 1/2 cup cooked cereal, rice or pasta.
Focus on whole grains because they have more fiber and nutrients than do refined grains. For instance, use brown rice instead of white rice, whole-wheat pasta instead of regular pasta and whole-grain bread instead of white bread. Look for products labeled “100% whole grain” or “100% whole wheat.”
Grains are naturally low in fat. Keep them this way by avoiding butter, cream and cheese sauces.
Vegetables: 4 to 5 servings a day
Tomatoes, carrots, broccoli, sweet potatoes, greens and other vegetables are full of fiber, vitamins, and such minerals as potassium and magnesium. Examples of one serving include 1 cup raw leafy green vegetables or 1/2 cup cut-up raw or cooked vegetables.
Don’t think of vegetables only as side dishes — a hearty blend of vegetables served over brown rice or whole-wheat noodles can serve as the main dish for a meal.
Fresh and frozen vegetables are both good choices. When buying frozen and canned vegetables, choose those labeled as low sodium or without added salt.
To increase the number of servings you fit in daily, be creative. In a stir-fry, for instance, cut the amount of meat in half and double up on the vegetables.
Fruits: 4 to 5 servings a day
Many fruits need little preparation to become a healthy part of a meal or snack. Like vegetables, they’re packed with fiber, potassium and magnesium and are typically low in fat — coconuts are an exception.
Examples of one serving include one medium fruit, 1/2 cup fresh, frozen or canned fruit, or 4 ounces of juice.
Have a piece of fruit with meals and one as a snack, then round out your day with a dessert of fresh fruits topped with a dollop of low-fat yogurt.
Leave on edible peels whenever possible. The peels of apples, pears and most fruits add interesting texture to recipes and contain healthy nutrients and fiber.
Remember that citrus fruits and juices, such as grapefruit, can interact with certain medications, so check with your doctor or pharmacist to see if they’re OK for you.
If you choose canned fruit or juice, make sure no sugar is added.
Dairy: 2 to 3 servings a day
Milk, yogurt, cheese and other dairy products are major sources of calcium, vitamin D and protein. But the key is to make sure that you choose dairy products that are low-fat or fat-free because otherwise they can be a major source of fat — and most of it is saturated.
Examples of one serving include 1 cup skim or 1 percent milk, 1 cup low-fat yogurt, or 1 1/2 ounces part-skim cheese.
Low-fat or fat-free frozen yogurt can help you boost the amount of dairy products you eat while offering a sweet treat. Add fruit for a healthy twist.
If you have trouble digesting dairy products, choose lactose-free products or consider taking an over-the-counter product that contains the enzyme lactase, which can reduce or prevent the symptoms of lactose intolerance.
Go easy on regular and even fat-free cheeses because they are typically high in sodium.
Lean meat, poultry and fish: 6 one-ounce servings or fewer a day
Meat can be a rich source of protein, B vitamins, iron and zinc. Choose lean varieties and aim for no more than 6 one-ounce servings a day. Cutting back on your meat portion will allow room for more vegetables.
Examples of one serving include 1 egg or 1 ounce of cooked meat, poultry or fish.
Trim away skin and fat from poultry and meat and then bake, broil, grill or roast instead of frying in fat.
Eat heart-healthy fish, such as salmon, herring and tuna. These types of fish are high in omega-3 fatty acids, which are healthy for your heart.
Nuts, seeds and legumes: 4 to 5 servings a week
Almonds, sunflower seeds, kidney beans, peas, lentils and other foods in this family are good sources of magnesium, potassium and protein.
They’re also full of fiber and phytochemicals, which are plant compounds that may protect against some cancers and cardiovascular disease.
Serving sizes are small and are intended to be consumed only a few times a week because these foods are higher in calories.
Examples of one serving include 1/3 cup nuts, 2 tablespoons seeds or nut butter, or 1/2 cup cooked beans or peas.
Nuts sometimes get a bad rap because of their fat content, but they contain healthy types of fat — monounsaturated fat and omega-3 fatty acids. Nuts are high in calories, however, so eat them in moderation. Try adding them to stir-fries, salads or cereals.
Soybean-based products, such as tofu and tempeh, can be a good alternative to meat because they contain all of the amino acids your body needs to make a complete protein, just like meat.
Fats and oils: 2 to 3 servings a day
Fat helps your body absorb essential vitamins and helps your body’s immune system. But too much fat increases your risk of heart disease, diabetes and obesity.
The DASH diet strives for a healthy balance by limiting total fat to less than 30 percent of daily calories from fat, with a focus on the healthier monounsaturated fats.
Examples of one serving include 1 teaspoon soft margarine, 1 tablespoon mayonnaise or 2 tablespoons salad dressing.
Saturated fat and trans fat are the main dietary culprits in increasing your risk of coronary artery disease. DASH helps keep your daily saturated fat to less than 6 percent of your total calories by limiting use of meat, butter, cheese, whole milk, cream and eggs in your diet, along with foods made from lard, solid shortenings, and palm and coconut oils.
Avoid trans fat, commonly found in such processed foods as crackers, baked goods and fried items.
Read food labels on margarine and salad dressing so that you can choose foods that are lowest in saturated fat and free of trans fat.
Sweets: 5 servings or fewer a week
You don’t have to banish sweets entirely while following the DASH diet — just go easy on them. Examples of one serving include 1 tablespoon sugar, jelly or jam, 1/2 cup sorbet, or 1 cup lemonade.
When you eat sweets, choose those that are fat-free or low-fat, such as sorbets, fruit ices, jelly beans, hard candy, graham crackers or low-fat cookies.
Artificial sweeteners such as aspartame (NutraSweet, Equal) and sucralose (Splenda) may help satisfy your sweet tooth while sparing the sugar. But remember that you still must use them sensibly. It’s OK to swap a diet cola for a regular cola, but not in place of a more nutritious beverage such as low-fat milk or even plain water.
Cut back on added sugar, which has no nutritional value but can pack on calories.
DASH diet: Alcohol and caffeine

Drinking too much alcohol can increase blood pressure. The Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommends that men limit alcohol to no more than two drinks a day and women to one or less.
The DASH diet doesn’t address caffeine consumption. The influence of caffeine on blood pressure remains unclear. But caffeine can cause your blood pressure to rise at least temporarily.

If you already have high blood pressure or if you think caffeine is affecting your blood pressure, talk to your doctor about your caffeine consumption.
DASH diet and weight loss

While the DASH diet is not a weight-loss program, you may indeed lose unwanted pounds because it can help guide you toward healthier food choices.
The DASH diet generally includes about 2,000 calories a day. If you’re trying to lose weight, you may need to eat fewer calories. You may also need to adjust your serving goals based on your individual circumstances — something your health care team can help you decide.

Tips to cut back on sodium

The foods at the core of the DASH diet are naturally low in sodium. So just by following the DASH diet, you’re likely to reduce your sodium intake. You also reduce sodium further by:

Using sodium-free spices or flavorings with your food instead of salt
Not adding salt when cooking rice, pasta or hot cereal
Rinsing canned foods to remove some of the sodium
Buying foods labeled “no salt added,” “sodium-free,” “low sodium” or “very low sodium”
One teaspoon of table salt has 2,325 mg of sodium. When you read food labels, you may be surprised at just how much sodium some processed foods contain.
Even low-fat soups, canned vegetables, ready-to-eat cereals and sliced turkey from the local deli — foods you may have considered healthy — often have lots of sodium.
You may notice a difference in taste when you choose low-sodium food and beverages. If things seem too bland, gradually introduce low-sodium foods and cut back on table salt until you reach your sodium goal. That’ll give your palate time to adjust.
Using salt-free seasoning blends or herbs and spices may also ease the transition. It can take several weeks for your taste buds to get used to less salty foods.
Putting the pieces of the DASH diet together

Try these strategies to get started on the DASH diet:
Change gradually. If you now eat only one or two servings of fruits or vegetables a day, try to add a serving at lunch and one at dinner. Rather than switching to all whole grains, start by making one or two of your grain servings whole grains. Increasing fruits, vegetables and whole grains gradually can also help prevent bloating or diarrhea that may occur if you aren’t used to eating a diet with lots of fiber. You can also try over-the-counter products to help reduce gas from beans and vegetables.
Reward successes and forgive slip-ups. Reward yourself with a nonfood treat for your accomplishments — rent a movie, purchase a book or get together with a friend. Everyone slips, especially when learning something new. Remember that changing your lifestyle is a long-term process. Find out what triggered your setback and then just pick up where you left off with the DASH diet.
Add physical activity. To boost your blood pressure lowering efforts even more, consider increasing your physical activity in addition to following the DASH diet. Combining both the DASH diet and physical activity makes it more likely that you’ll reduce your blood pressure.
Get support if you need it. If you’re having trouble sticking to your diet, talk to your doctor or dietitian about it. You might get some tips that will help you stick to the DASH diet.

Remember, healthy eating isn’t an all-or-nothing proposition. What’s most important is that, on average, you eat healthier foods with plenty of variety — both to keep your diet nutritious and to avoid boredom or extremes. And with the DASH diet, you can have both.

 

 

Wikipedia Reports: DASH DIET needs more medical references for verification or relies too heavily on primary sources.

The DASH diet (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) is a dietary pattern promoted by the U.S.-based National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), an agency of the United States Department of Health and Human Services) to prevent and control hypertension. The DASH diet is rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and low-fat dairy foods. It includes meat, fish, poultry, nuts, and beans, and is limited in sugar-sweetened foods and beverages, red meat, and added fats. In addition to its effect on blood pressure, it is designed to be a well-balanced approach to eating for the general public. DASH is recommended by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) as a healthy eating plan. The DASH diet is one of three healthy diets recommended in the 2015-2020 US Dietary Guidelines, which also include the Mediterranean diet or a vegetarian diet. The AHA considers the DASH diet «specific and well-documented across age, sex and ethnically diverse groups».
The DASH diet is based on NIH studies that examined three dietary plans and their results. None of the plans were vegetarian, but the DASH plan incorporated more fruits and vegetables, low fat or nonfat dairy, beans, and nuts than the others studied. The DASH diet reduced systolic blood pressure by 6 mm Hg and diastolic blood pressure by 3 mm Hg in patients with high normal blood pressure (formerly called “pre-hypertension”). Those with hypertension dropped by 11 and 6 mm Hg, respectively. These changes in blood pressure occurred with no changes in body weight. The DASH dietary pattern is adjusted based on daily caloric intake ranging from 1,600 to 3,100 dietary calories. Although this diet is associated with a reduction of blood pressure and improvement of gout, there are uncertainties around whether its recommendation of low-fat dairy products is beneficial or detrimental. The diet is also advised to diabetic or obese individuals.
The DASH diet was further tested and developed in the Optimal Macronutrient Intake Trial for Heart Health (OmniHeart diet). “The DASH and DASH-sodium trials demonstrated that a carbohydrate-rich diet that emphasizes fruits, vegetables, and low-fat dairy products and that is reduced in saturated fat, total fat, and cholesterol substantially lowered blood pressure and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. OmniHeart demonstrated that partial replacement of carbohydrate with either protein (about half from plant sources) or with unsaturated fat (mostly monounsaturated fat) can further reduce blood pressure, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and coronary heart disease risk.”
In January 2018, DASH was named the number 1 for “Best Diets Overall” for the eighth year in a row,, and also as “For Healthy Eating”, and “Best Heart-Healthy Diet”; and tied number 2 “For Diabetes”(out of 40 diets tested) in the U.S. News & World Report’s annual “Best Diets” rankings.
The DASH diet is similar to the Mediterranean diet and the AHA diet.

PROS and CONS

It’s Your Life, Take Care Of It…

PROS: Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension, or DASH, has been voted as the best overall diet for several years…(DASH) was developed by a panel of experts at the National Institutes of Health to help Americans lower their blood pressure, but as it turns out it is also effective at weight loss as well.

CONS: DASH is not a weight loss plan for those looking for a “quick fix” solution. In the aforementioned U.S. News and World Report Best Diets rankings, DASH only ranked number nine for “best weight loss diets”. As with other diets, it must be adopted as a long-term lifestyle change in order to work.

All the information in this article is found in MAYO CLINIC, Wikipedia.

We do not endorse any product or research. It is up to you to make your own conclusion which is right for you.

 

 

 

KETO DIET… Not all Hype


Keto Diet

The ketogenic diet is all about eating the right foods in the right proportions. When you get it right, it’ll trigger your body to start burning stored fat.

Is it a Diet or is it a Lifestyle change? That’s the question… Are you seeking to medically repair an illness or weight loss permantely.

In the 1920’s it was medically introduced to treat epilepsy in children. Today it helps diabetics regulate their blood sugar levels. It’s also being introduced to cancer patients for weight control.

Yes, you can use it as a diet method and loose the weight you need and go back to the same old lifestyle. But, by returning to sugar and yeast you are creating a YO-YO diet lifestyle. It’s better to try and balance a nutrious diet.

What foods can you eat?

Ewoldt says:

  • nuts
  • seeds
  • full-fat cheese and other dairy products
  • plain Greek yogurt
  • non-starchy and fibrous vegetables
  • oils
  • along with smaller amounts of meats, eggs and fish, become keto diet mainstays.


You’ll need to sharply limit carbohydrates

  • bread and baked goods
  • sweets
  • pasta
  • breakfast cereals
  • starchy vegetables like potatoes, sweet potatoes
  • corn and peas
  • beans
  • fruit
  • beer

Does it really work for weight loss?

Yes — but that answer comes with a qualifier. It takes two to three weeks on the diet to start fat burning (ketosis) in the body. So, don’t expect instant results. Some studies have shown that adhering to low- or very-low-carbohydrate ketogenic diets helps people lose weight. However, long term there is little difference between a ketogenic diet and a higher carbohydrate diet.

Ketogenic diet for Epilepsy

The ketogenic diet is a high-fat, adequate-protein, low-carbohydrate diet that in medicine is used primarily to treat difficult-to-control epilepsy in children and now for adults.

The diet forces the body to burn fats rather than carbohydrates. Normally, the carbohydrates contained in food are converted into glucose, which is then transported around the body and is particularly important in fueling brain function.

However, if little carbohydrate remains in the diet, the liver converts fat into fatty acids and ketone bodies. The ketone bodies pass into the brain and replace glucose as an energy source.

An elevated level of ketone bodies in the blood, a state known as ketosis, leads to a reduction in the frequency of epileptic seizures.

Around half of children and young people with epilepsy who have tried some form of this diet saw the number of seizures drop by at least half, and the effect persists even after discontinuing the diet.

Some evidence indicates that adults with epilepsy may benefit from the diet, and that a less strict regimen, such as a modified Atkins diet, is similarly effective.

APPLE CINNAMON EMPANADAS BAKED


  • Prep Time: 90 minutes
  • Cook Time: 10 minutes
  • Total Time: 100 minutes
  • Yield: 20 servings +

Yummy Sweet Empanadas filled with apples and cinnamon. Great to make for party appetizers or regular snack size for ice cream ala mode.

Apple Filling Instructions

Ingredients

  • 9 medium apples, peeled, cored and sliced
  • 3 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 8 tablespoons salted butter (1 Cube/ Stick)
  • 4 tablespoons cornstarch
  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • 2 1/2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
  1. Peel apples and remove core. Cut in Half and slice length wise 1/4″ thick,, after cut into 1/2 inch pieces.
  2. Melt butter in saucepan remove pan from heat
  3. Add lemon juice, sugar, cinnamon, cornstarch and water. Stir together until all is mixed. I let it sit for about 10 minutes so the cornstarch and sugar have a chance to dissolve really good.
  4. Bring covered pot to a boil and turn to medium heat. Simmer for 5 minutes while stirring frequently or until apples are al dente soft. Still Firm
  5. Remove from heat and let cool. At least 2 hours, better if over night.
  6. You can make this a few days ahead and refrigerator. Great to prepare and freeze or can it.

Pie Crust

  • You can buy already made pie crust dough in your stores refrigerated section by the cookie dough if you need it quickly.
  • I prefer the HOMEMADE DOUGH listed below.

Ingredients:

Dough only makes 1 dozen handy snack size and 20 small appetizer size

  • 3 cups (375 g) all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon (2 ml) salt
  • 2 teaspoons (10 ml) sugar
  • 3/4 cups (185 ml) cold unsalted butter, cubed
  • 1 egg
  • 6-8 tablespoons (90-120 ml) cold water
  • Place all you ingredients in the food processor, bread maker or in a bowl and mix till dough is completely mixed.
  • Roll dough till 1/8″ thickness. Use Large Cookie, Biscuit cutter, coffee cup for appetizer size or medium sized cereal bowl to make large hand size. Lay on cookie sheet separated with plastic wrap and leave in refrigerator for 30 minutes or until firm
  • (This dough can be made up to 2 days ahead of time, just refrigerate or freeze the circles with wax paper in between.)

Fill Dough

  • Remove your dough from refrigerator
  • Fill circles with desired filling
  • Brush edges with water, fold over in half. Press edges together and crimp with fork. This ensures that the filling will stay inside.
  • Refrigerate them before baking or frying, especially if you’re making more than a dozen. Refrigerate for at least 20 minutes.

Baking Instructions

  • Preheat oven to 400 F
  • Remove from refrigerator
  • Arrange on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper or a really good non stick pan. Brush tops with egg wash, olive oil or butter if desired.
  • Bake small appetizer empanadas for 15-18 minutes or until golden brown; larger empanadas for 18-25 minutes or until golden.
  • Watch closely so they don’t burn.
  • Convection oven may be lowered to 375 F

Bon Appetit… Enjoy

Prune paste


Time: 20 Minutes Skill Level: Easy Suggested age: 6 months and up

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup prunes
  • 2/3 Cups Water

Combine prunes and 2/3 cup water in a small saucepan and bring to a boil. Lower heat to medium-low, cover and simmer until very soft, about 10 minutes.  

Carefully transfer prune mixture to a food processor and purée until smooth.  

The purée will keep refrigerated in an airtight container for up to 3 days or in the freezer for up to 3 months.  

Nutritional Info:
  • Serving: about 1/4 cup
  • 110 calories
  • 5mg sodium
  • 26g carbohydrates
  • 2g dietary fiber
  • 13g sugar
  • 1g protein.

SIMPLE TUNA CASSEROLE


YUMMY, NUTRIOUS and GOOD FOR YOU.

This recipe is simple and easy. Best of all no preservatives, no extra sugar and no extra yeast.

If you ever wonder why you are eating so little but gaining so much. It’s the quality of your food. If you are constantly consuming your meals from boxes, cans and the frozen meals off the shelf of the market. There lies your problem. Garbage in, Garbage weight you will gain.

This is fresh hot delicious food you will enjoy eating and your body will thank you…

Total Time: 1 hour 15 mins

Ingredients:

  • 12 ounce can Tuna (drained)
  • 2 cups frozen Peas (if you don’t like Peas, Pick them out, It gives a special sweetness to the casserole)
  • 3/4 stick Butter
  • 1/2 teaspoon Salt
  • 1 teaspoon Salt (No it’s not a Typo)
  • 1 teaspoon ground Black Pepper
  • 2 tablespoons Flour
  • 2 1/2 cups Whole Milk or Cream (590 ml)
  • 1/2 cup Gouda Cheese
  • 1/2 Monterey Jack
  • 13″ x 9″ x 4″ casserole dish with lid or foil

Butter your casserole dish

Take a 1 teaspoon of the butter and grease the entire 13″ x 9″ x 4″ or any dish with similar dimensions. Glass preferred.

Take a mason jar or any jar with a lid:

Add Pepper, Salt, Flour and Milk or Cream. And shake till all the flour is combined and smooth. You may want to shake for a few minutes and let rest and return in 10 minutes and shake some more. Take the remaining butter throw it in a pan along with your rue and warm over stove constantly stirring until steam arises from surface. Remove from Heat.

Boil your water add the 1 teaspoon salt after the water boils. Place Peas in first make sure water is still boiling. Add the Pasta in and boil for 10 minutes stirring occasionally. Drain, Place drained Pasta and Peas into the casserole dish. Take the flour rue and stir for a few minutes and make sure there are no lumps. Pour over Pasta and stir gently until all pasta and peas are thoroughly covered in the rue. Place cheese evenly over the pasta one at a time so it is evenly covered with both cheeses.

BAKE AT 350 Degrees for 20 minutes or until cheese is slightly brown. Cover with lid or foil and continue to cook for 25 minutes, Remove from oven and let sit for 15 minutes and serve.

This is fantastic if you want to freeze small portions for later. Frozen dinners with no preservatives or extra sodium you don’t need.

Bon Appetite… Enjoy

Anxiety, Linked To Grocery Shopping And Meal Time


Time consumption of grocery shopping… I am actually having anixety because I have to dedicate a few more hours to my grocery shopping now. Taking my mobile phone in so I can check the ingredients on the labels.
Where have the days gone when you could going shopping for an hour or so. Putting our trust in the manufactors of our food products is really become a risky business.
Reading labels these days has become a spelling bee, because of the additives. Processed foods have so many additives. In my view food has become unhealthy and toxic.

So many questions I have to ask myself and to remember them all is taxing my brain.
It use to be so simple. What is the experation date?

Not only additives but dangerous listeria and E.coli. We need to ask what country is this being processed, made or grown in? Has this item or is it on a recall list? https://www.recalls.gov/

Checking everything is a BIG time consumming task.

Check your labels and look up all the ingredients you don’t know. If you are going to buy any boxed, processed, frozen or fresh meat . I try not to buy pre-packaged foods but sometimes you don’t have a choice. I know you say “no time”. I have found a few ways to curb cooking time.

I bought a bread maker and I now make my own bread. I eat good bread all the time. Unbleached Flour, Salt, Sugar, Butter, Water and only 2 teaspoons of yeast per 2 pounds of dough that I cook in my oven. You can let the bread maker make 1 LB loaves of bread quickly while you do something else. It just turns out a little heavier than I like sometimes. I use those loaves for yummy french toast. But my yeast is cut by 2\3 and so is the sugar compared to store bought bread. Best of all no preservatives.

Don’t get me wrong. I still buy dry pasta and rice. I have no time to make fresh pasta. I occaionally have bought the fresh made pasta at the store. But that comes with preservestives also. Soon I hope to try and make my own. It’s very simple and you can make the dough in a bread maker or food processor. Fresh pasta is a simple homemade treat with a pasta press machine. Endless pasta recipes. So come back for yummy pasta recipes in a few months. Till then check out these Italian Grandmas for recipes. https://youtu.be/wKOgzfgI48c

Let your machines do the work while you enjoy the benefits of a healthy product made by you.

Making meals from “real” food really can be super easy. I bought a Multi Cooker / Pressure cooker and I drop in frozen meat, veggies and seasonings. You’ll have pleanty of time to take a shower or get the kids into the tub. 30 to 45 minutes later you have a meal.

You can prepare most of your veggies ahead of time. You could make it for a whole week while you watch tv. Just put them in a container and refrigerate or freeze them. Or if you must buy frozen vegtables. READ the ingrediant label. Some have preservatives.

Check out my recipes for the bread maker and plain old simple recipes for a healthier life style. BLOG

I Know Who I Am NOT…


By Chad Rhodes

When was the last time you took a long look into that mirror? When was the last time you have done the “Me Check”? And if you did, did you ask yourself what have I been thinking???? Mental Check Up is worth a million my friend… If You assume you are “Un-Breakable”, your not. We sometimes forget that we are all humans.

Stop consuming your life and live it

Stop feeling sorry for yourself and start living

Stop Playing the victim and start living

We all need to keep up with these small things that could change our life rapidly into the dark side . Don’t keep that door closed on the “I can’t” corner. Open up and let it go so you can dump off the excess.

Don’t you wonder why we all think that we can not do something. That small hesitation, that we all have right before we are about to board a “Risk”. Our fears take over, even when we know we can.

Don’t be fooled it happens to everyone. You just need the correct tools to combat the negative fields that seem to pile up at times..

Listen to a great inspirational speech by Matthew McConaughey

We all have that moment when we can change it to reflect the positive. Just remember we can all find ourselves on the positive side when we let go of the excess. You might ask what is excess. That you must ask yourself. What makes you crazy, your fears, the negative influences. You’ll find it when you start to look for it. Then You Can Open That Door and Throw It Away.

If you’re suicidal, we recommend contacting the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline toll-free at 800-273-8255. Additional crisis and suicide hotlines are available in the category below, Crises and Suicide. Need help for domestic violence? Call toll-free: 800-799-7233 (SAFE).

#VacationHawaii

AMERICA, CODE BLUE… Young Pregnant Women Down!


USA Reports: Cardiac Arrest In Younger Pregnant Women Is On The Rise

BY: Chad Rhodes

NYU – School Of Medicine has conducted a study for the past 12 years on Heart Disease in pregnant women. Between 2002 and 2014 Cardiac Arrest has been the leading cause of death for 25% of young pregnant women. Heart Disease has been the number one cause of death for women for many years, but for younger women this is a drastic change compared to earlier years.

The disease in young women has been increasing and raising great concerns not only for the mother, but for the health of the unborn child also.  The risk factors for heart disease continue to increase in the United States. “High blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes are all higher in our younger women. Stress is another factor in High Risk pregnancy.

Rise in obesity in society plays a big part. Between more junk food available and the convenience of the “Drive Thru food”. Adding yeast to many packaged food and many drinks also.

Don’t get me started on Soda. This is a heart Killer, Diet KILLER.

You could ask if the younger women are getting enough “Quality” exercise, food and fluid intake. We all know with our busy lives exercise is the last thing we want to do after work all day. Making a wholesome meal for the family is about all the energy you can muster up. You end up asking yourself, where do I fit the time in?

The family entrees from the frozen section become your main staples. The concentrated amounts of sodium and preservatives is off the charts. Not only are you adding all this to your body that is creating it’s own voyage of problems to your heart risk factors.

Exercise does not have to mean Hitting the Gym 3 times a week. You can walk, band workout and create a new healthy diet. Include fresh home cooked meals that are lean, ending bad calorie intake.

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Healthy Ingredients

Get the kids to help you in the kitchen with dinner. Bringing your kids up with healthy choices makes their lifestyle an asset to their healthy future. Kids are great for washing the vegetables and mixing things up relieves you from 30 minutes of stress and time.

Most parents can not spend hours away from the kids, house or work. My solution is to incorporate the kids activities with yours.

Weekends are a good place to start. Take the kids for a walk every morning, that gets all of you on the road to increased blood flow through your body. As we all know the heart needs lots of exercise and if you sit for 8 hours a day, you need this more than those who stand up for work.

The U.K. Side

BJOG: UK Reports, Nearly one in four cardiac arrests in pregnancy are associated with complications of obstetric anesthesia.

Nearly one in four cardiac arrests in pregnancy are associated with complications of obstetric anesthesia, according to a new study published today (Friday 24 February) in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology (BJOG).

The aim of this study was to estimate the incidence of cardiac arrest in the UK obstetric population, describe how cardiac arrest in pregnancy is managed and report maternal and fetal outcomes. Using the UK Obstetric Surveillance System (UKOSS), researchers identified 66 women who had experienced a cardiac arrest in pregnancy among 2.3 million who gave birth between 2011 and 2014.

The three year study shows that maternal cardiac arrest in the UK is very rare (a 1 in 36,000 risk) and that maternal survival rates of 58% were possible due to timely resuscitation and rapid perimortem caesarean section (PMCS). In the 66 women involved in the study, cardiac output was restored in 48 and 49 women had a PMCS. The results also show that time from collapse to PMCS was significantly shorter in women who survived. 58 babies were delivered, 12 were stillborn.

Results found that the main association of collapse among antenatal women was obstetric anesthesia, given as an epidural, spinal or combined spinal-epidural. 16 (24%) of the women in the study had a cardiac arrest following obstetric anesthesia (all survived).

Meanwhile, 12 of the 16 women (75%) who had a cardiac arrest following obstetric anesthesia were obese (defined as having a Body Mass Index of 30kg/m2 or more). This supports the view that obese pregnant women are at a higher risk of complications of anesthesia, as the increased body fat makes procedures technically more difficult.

The study also shows that hypovolaemia (a decrease in blood volume), venous thromboembolism (a formation of blood clots in the vein) and amniotic fluid embolism (when amniotic fluid or other debris makes its way into the mother’s blood) are the main non-anaesthetic causes of cardiac arrest. As recommended in the most recent MBRRACE-UK report, there is a pressing need to improve systems focused on preventing and responding appropriately to these complications.”

In addition, of the 66 women who arrested in pregnancy, 27 had co-morbidities which may have contributed to maternal arrest. The most common problems reported were asthma, mental health problems, cardiac disease, hypertension, hematological, autoimmune and endocrine problems.

The researchers suggest a revision of multi-disciplinary training for healthcare professionals, and a revision of supervision and support on the labor ward.

Dr Virginia Beckett, lead author and consultant obstetrician and gynecologist at Bradford Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, said:

“Our study shows that management of cardiac arrest in pregnancy in the UK, following the introduction of training such as the Managing Obstetric Emergencies and Trauma (MOET) course, has resulted in a 58% maternal survival rate. The main reasons for this appear to be the involvement of senior medical professionals and swift PMCS.

“American data shows that up to one third of women who arrest die with their baby still in utero. In the UK, we take a very different approach; in this study, PMCS was carried out in 49 (74%) of the 66 women involved (only two women remained undelivered when they should have had a PMCS). This is close to a five-fold improvement. Rapid PMCS saves women’s lives.

“However, our study shows that the single, biggest association of maternal cardiac arrest is a complication of anesthesia. Further research is needed into this finding which presents an opportunity to reduce the incidence of maternal cardiac in the UK.

Mr Edward Morris, Vice President for Clinical Quality at the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (RCOG), said:

“This study demonstrates the importance of robust multi-disciplinary risk assessment processes in antenatal care, as well as team training to manage obstetric emergencies. It is also a great example of the value of collecting high quality data through UKOSS to improve outcomes for patients.

“Childbirth can be unpredictable and timely access to specialist care is critical; especially for those considered at higher risk due to per-existing health conditions. This data supports existing evidence that maternal cardiac arrest is becoming more common, and there may be opportunities to further improve survival rates through detailed analysis of this data.

“Obesity has reached pandemic proportions globally, with around one in five pregnant women in the UK considered obese. This increases their risk of miscarriage, stillbirth and neonatal death as well gestational diabetes, blood clots, per-eclampsia, more complicated labors, and severe bleeding after the birth. Although they survived, a high proportion of the women who had cardiac arrests following obstetric anesthesia were obese.

“Maintaining a normal body weight can reduce the risk of complications for both mother and baby. Women should keep active and eat well prior to conception and limit weight gain during pregnancy in order to improve their own health and provide their baby with the best start in life.”

Mr Michael Masch, Deputy Editor-in-chief of BJOG, added:

“Although about 60 percent of women survived, and most received timely resuscitation and perimortem caesarean section, this study highlights the necessity for regular multi-disciplinary training in specific arrest management. Further research into the links between anesthesia and cardiac arrest is also warranted.”

Ends

For media inquiries or copies of the study please contact the RCOG press office on 020 7772 6357 or email .

Notes to editors:

VA Beckett, M Knight, and P Sharpe. The CAPS Study: Incidence, management and outcomes of cardiac arrest in pregnancy in the UK: a prospective, descriptive study. BJOG 2017: DOI: 10.1111/1471-0528.14521

The article can be found here: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1471-0528.14521/full

This study was funded by a grant from Wellbeing of Women.

BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology is owned by the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (RCOG) but is editorially independent and published monthly by Wiley. The journal features original, peer-reviewed, high-quality medical research in all areas of obstetrics and gynecology worldwide. Please quote ‘BJOG’ or ‘BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology’ when referring to the journal. To keep up to date with our latest papers, follow @BJOGTweets.

The Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists is a medical charity that champions the provision of high quality women’s healthcare in the UK and beyond. It is dedicated to encouraging the study and advancing the science and practice of obstetrics and gynecology. It does this through postgraduate medical education and training and the publication of clinical guidelines and reports on aspects of the specialty and service provision.

Eating Clean Does Not Mean Starving Yourself


23 Ways To Eat Clean

Replace processed, fake foods with these healthier clean eating foods.

Cleaner, healthier eating

Healthy eating isn’t always easy, especially with junk foods tempting you at the grocery store, corner deli, and even the office kitchen. Though clean eating at every meal isn’t always realistic, you can take steps to limit processed food. Here, we show how common foods morph from real (i.e. apples) to highly processed (apple toaster pastries).

Has YOUR Diet been High Jacked by the manufactures? The #1 reason your belly fat won’t go away is Hidden SUGAR! Manufactures have replaced sugar with Corn Syrup, Artificial Sugar Syrup and other sugar substitutes. Read your labels. Same for sodium. Your goal: Choose from natural foods as often as possible, go with foods that are somewhat processed in a pinch, and limit your intake of highly processed items to none.

1. Apples
1st choice (natural state): Apple
2nd choice (somewhat processed): Applesauce
Limit (highly processed): Apple toaster pastry
Shopping tip: While applesauce is a healthy choice, it has fewer nutrients than a whole apple.

2. Oranges
1st choice (natural state): Orange
2nd choice (somewhat processed): 100% orange juice
Limit (highly processed): Orange drink
Shopping tip: Many fruit drinks contain high fructose corn syrup and little real juice.

3. Strawberries
1st choice (natural state): Fresh strawberries
2nd choice (somewhat processed): Strawberry preserves
Limit to NONE (highly processed): Strawberry gelatin dessert
Shopping tip: Gelatin desserts usually contain artificial strawberry flavor, not real fruit.

4. Peaches
1st choice (natural state): Peach
2nd choice (somewhat processed): Canned peaches in 100% juice
Limit (highly processed): Canned peaches in heavy syrup
Shopping tip: Fruit canned in heavy syrup has more sugar and calories than fresh fruit.

5. Figs
1st choice (natural state): Fresh figs
2nd choice (somewhat processed): Fig preserves
Limit (highly processed): Fig sandwich cookies
Shopping tip: Packaged fruit cookies may contain refined sugar and preservatives.

6. Pineapple
1st choice (natural state): Pineapple
2nd choice (somewhat processed): Canned diced pineapple
Limit (highly processed): Pineapple cocktail cup
Shopping tip: Fresh pineapple is higher in vitamins C and A and beta-carotene than canned.

7. Corn
1st choice (natural state): Corn on the cob
2nd choice (somewhat processed): Corn tortilla chips
Limit (highly processed): Cornflakes
Shopping tip: Buy tortilla chips with just three ingredients: whole corn, oil, and salt—and eat in moderation with Fresh Homemade Salsa or Pica De Gallo.

8. Spinach
1st choice (natural state): Spinach
2nd choice (somewhat processed): Bagged prewashed spinach
Limit (highly processed): Frozen creamed spinach
Shopping tip: When buying frozen vegetables, avoid those packaged with sodium-rich sauces. Buy plain and add your own light sauce. (Is spinach healthier than kale? Find out in their Health Food Face-Off.)

9. Garlic
1st choice (natural state): Garlic
2nd choice (somewhat processed): Jarred minced garlic
Limit (highly processed): Bottled garlic marinade
Shopping tip: Minced fresh garlic is cheaper and more flavorful than jarred.

You Shouldn’t Toss Sprouted Garlic out. Plant it in your garden to keep pests away.

10. Carrots
1st choice (natural state): Carrots
2nd choice (somewhat processed): Baby carrots
Limit (highly processed): Frozen honey-glazed carrots
Shopping tip: Baby carrots are healthy but more expensive than regular-size loose carrots.

11. Soup
1st choice (natural state): Soup from scratch
2nd choice (somewhat processed): Canned soup
Limit (highly processed): Dehydrated soup mix
Shopping tip: Homemade soup often has less sodium and more flavor than canned.

12. HAM
1st choice (natural state): Heritage ham
2nd choice (somewhat processed): Deli ham
Limit (highly processed): Packaged deli bologna
Shopping tip: Heritage varieties of pork are much less likely to contain hormones than factory meat is.

13. Turkey
1st choice (natural ttate): Whole turkey
2nd choice (somewhat processed): Deli turkey
Limit (highly processed): Store-bought turkey meatballs
Shopping tip: If you buy turkey and other meats at the deli counter, ask for brands free of fillers and nitrates.

14. Beef
1st choice (natural state): Grass-fed beef
2nd choice (somewhat processed): Grain-fed beef
Limit (highly processed): Frozen beef patties
Shopping tip: Grass-fed meat is higher in nutrients and lower in fat than grain-fed beef.

15. Chicken
1st choice (natural state): Fresh chicken breasts
2nd choice (somewhat processed): Deli sliced chicken
Limit (highly processed): Chicken nuggets
Shopping tip: Chicken nuggets contain very little real chicken.

16. Eggs
1st choice (natural state): Pasture-raised eggs
2nd choice (somewhat processed): Omega-3-fortified eggs
Limit (highly processed): Egg beaters
Shopping Tip: Pasture-raised eggs may have 35% less saturated fat, 60% more vitamin A, and 200% more omega-3s compared to omega-3-fortified eggs and egg beaters, which come from chickens kept in coops.

17. Cream
1st choice (natural state): Cream
2nd choice (somewhat processed): Fat-free half cream / half milk
Limit (highly processed): Flavored dairy creamer
Shopping tip: Flavored dairy creamers are often made with colorings, artificial flavors, and corn syrup.

18. Yogurt
1st choice (natural state): Organic 100% Natural Plain yogurt no sugar added with Fresh Fruit
2nd choice (somewhat processed): Flavored yogurt
Limit (highly processed): Flavored yogurt drink
Shopping tip: Buy plain yogurt and flavor it at home with honey or fresh fruit.

19. Bread
1st choice (natural state): Whole grain bread
2nd choice (somewhat processed): Wheat bread
Limit (highly processed): Fortified white bread
Shopping tip: If a whole grain isn’t the first ingredient, you’re missing out on nutrients.
20. Pasta
1st choice (natural state): Dried whole wheat pasta
2nd choice (somewhat processed): Dried white pasta
Limit (highly processed): Instant noodles, Simen, Mac & Cheese
Shopping tip: Whole grain pasta is higher in antioxidants than white or instant noodles.

21. Brown
1st choice (natural state): Brown rice
2nd choice (somewhat processed): White rice
Limit (highly processed): Flavored instant rice
Shopping tip: Brown rice, unlike white, hasn’t had its fiber-rich layers of bran and germ removed.

22. Peanuts
1st choice (natural state): Peanuts
2nd choice (somewhat processed): Natural peanut butter
Limit (highly processed): Processed peanut butter
Shopping tip: Natural peanut butter should contain only peanuts and a dash of salt.

23. Soy
1st choice (natural state): Fresh edamame (whole soybeans)
2nd choice (somewhat processed): Tofu
Limit (highly processed): Frozen veggie burgers (containing soy ingredients)
Shopping tip: Frozen veggie burgers are vegetarian-friendly but are highly processed.

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It has been shown that eating a correct diet of clean foods can lessen the impact of depression and several other illnesses.

 

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Super Delicious “Off the Wall” Bean Recipes #9


Super Delicious “Off the Wall” Bean Recipes #9

#9 JAPANESE HOKKAIDO AZUKI BEANS

Grown in the rich volcanic soil of Hokkaido, the cold northernmost island of Japan.

Their deep, burgundy sheen will attest to their nutritious quality and flavor.

Anko, sweet red bean paste, is used in many baked goods and sweet treats in Japan.  It is usually prepared by boiling and sometimes mashing azuki beans and then sweetening the paste with sugar.  The most common types of read bean paste include Tsubuan and Koshian.

Tsubuan is prepared by boiling and sweetening with sugar.  Koshian is prepared by passing through a sieve to remove bean skins, and this is most commonly used for wagashi (traditional Japanese confectionery).

Other varieties of anko includes Shiroan, made from Japanese white beans and Kurian made from chestnuts.

Anko is used in Anmitsu, Daifuku, Dango, Dorayaki, Oshiruko / Zenzai, Taiyaki, Manju, and Yokan.

How To Make Anko (Red Bean Paste)

Ingredients

  • 200g (7 oz, a little bit less than 1 cup which is 220g) Azuki beans (Today I used Hokkaido Dainagon Azuki Beans (bigger than regular azuki))
  • Water
  • 200g (7 oz, 1 cup) granulated white sugar
  • Pinch of salt

 

Instructions

  • Soak the azuki beans overnight (8-12 hours).
  • Rinse azuki beans.
  • Use a big saucepan/pot because the amount of azuki beans will double after cooking. Put washed azuki beans in the pot and pour water till 1-2 inch above azuki beans. Turn the heat on high.
  • When boiling, turn off the heat and cover with lid. Let it stand for 5 minutes.
  • Throw away water and put the azuki beans into a sieve.
  • Put the azuki beans back in the pot. Add enough water just to cover the beans and turn the heat on high. Once boiling, turn down the heat to medium low and keep it simmering.
  • Once in a while push the azuki beans under the water with slotted spoon. Water will evaporate so you need to keep adding water to cover just above the beans. If you put too much water, the beans will move and break. If you need to leave the kitchen, make sure to turn off the heat. Cook for 1+ hour.
  • Pick one azuki bean and squeeze it with your fingers. If it is smashes easily, it’s done.
  • Turn up the heat to high and add sugar in 3 separate times. Stirring constantly. When you draw a line on the bottom of the saucepan and see the bottom for more than 2 seconds, add salt and turn off heat. Anko will thicken more when it cools.

Anko is ready to use. If you’re not using right away, put it in an airtight container to cool down. Once it’s cooled, keep in the fridge or freezer. I recommend storing it in small 100g packages. Wrap each anko in plastic wrap and store in a Ziploc Freezer bag. Homemade anko can be stored in the fridge for a week and freezer up to a month

 

 

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Super Delicious “Off the Wall” Bean Recipes #6


Super Delicious “Off the Wall” Bean Recipes #6

       Homestyle Baked Beans

#6 The Sunset Runner Bean has been grown in America as early as 1750, but originated in the mountains of Central America. It is a flowering heirloom bean with unique salmon-pink blossoms which can be used as an ornamental climber.

It produces flavorful beans with a distinct flavor that can be used in soups, salads and baked bean dishes.

Ingredients

2-3 cups SUNSET RUNNER BEANS

2 Tbs. extra virgin olive oil

1 medium onion, chopped

½ cup celery, chopped

2 cloves garlic, peeled and crushed

1 leek, cleaned and chopped

3 carrot, peeled and chopped

2 turnips, peeled and chopped

1 cup mushrooms, sliced (optional)

2 zucchini, sliced

3 medium potatoes, peeled and chopped

2 to 3 cans chicken or beef broth

1 Tbs. dried basil

2 Tbs. dried parsley or 3 Tbs. fresh parsley, chopped

Pinch of sage

2 cups chopped cabbage

½ cup dried pasta

salt and pepper to taste

Instructions

1. Rinse and pick over beans. In a large pot, pour three cups boiling water over beans, cover, and let sit for one hour. Drain, add fresh water to cover by one inch and simmer until tender, not mushy. Start checking the tenderness at 45 minutes. Drain cooked beans when reach desired tenderness.

2. In a large pot, heat 2 Tbs. Olive Oil and add onion, celery, garlic, leek, carrots, turnips, mushrooms (if using), zucchini, and potatoes. Sauté all vegetables over low heat until wilted.

3. Add beans to the pot and 2 to 3 cans chicken or beef broth with enough water to cover the beans by an inch or so.

4. Add dried basil, parsley and a pinch of sage. Bring to a boil, turn down to simmer and cook for 2 hours or until beans are tender.

5. Once beans are tender you can add cabbage and a handful of dried pasta and cook until pasta is tender. Salt and pepper to taste.

Servings : 6-8

Super Delicious “Off the Wall” Bean Recipes #7


Super Delicious “Off the Wall” Bean Recipes #7

#7 Christmas Lima Beans

The alluring burgundy mottled, chestnut-flavored Christmas Lima is part of Peru’s heirloom bean lineage. One can serve cooked limas as an appetizer, side dish or main course embellished with butter, garlic and fresh parsley.

A favorite in kitchens around the world, Christmas lima beans boast a rich, mellow chestnut flavor and a firm texture.

Be sure to soak the beans before cooking. To soak overnight, place the beans in a large pot and add water to cover by 2 inches. The next day, drain the beans and cook as directed below. For a quick soak, place the beans in a large pot and add water to cover by 2 inches. Bring to a boil over high heat, remove from the heat, cover the pot and let stand for 1 hour, then drain the beans and cook. To decrease the cooking time by about half, cook the soaked beans in a pressure cooker on high pressure.

Ingredients:

2 cup dried Christmas lima beans, picked over, rinsed, soaked and drained

1/2 small yellow onion

1 carrot, cut in half crosswise

1 celery stalk, cut in half crosswise

1 fresh thyme sprig

1 bay leaf

Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste

1/4 cup red wine vinegar

1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil

1/4 cup chopped mixed fresh herbs, such as parsley, chives, tarragon, chervil, marjoram and oregano

1/3 cup finely diced red onion

1/3 cup finely diced carrot

1/3 cup finely diced celery

Fresh lemon juice, to taste

Understanding PTSD’s Effects on Brain, Body, and Emotions. By Janet Seahorn, Ph.D

Directions:

Place the beans in a large pot and add water to cover by 2 inches. Add the yellow onion, carrot and celery pieces, thyme sprig and bay leaf. Bring to a simmer over medium-high heat, reduce the heat to medium-low and simmer, stirring occasionally, until the beans are tender, 1 to 1 1/2 hours. Season with salt and pepper, then drain the beans. Remove and discard the yellow onion, carrot, celery, thyme sprig and bay leaf. Transfer the beans to a bowl.

Meanwhile, in a small bowl, whisk together the vinegar, olive oil and chopped herbs. Season the vinaigrette with salt and pepper.

Add the vinaigrette, diced red onion, carrot and celery to the beans and stir to combine. Refrigerate for 1 hour, stirring occasionally to evenly distribute the vinaigrette. Just before serving, adjust the seasonings with salt and pepper and stir in lemon juice. Serve chilled or at room temperature. Serves 4 to 6.   Williams-Sonoma Kitchen.

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Are You Tired of the Yo –Yo Dieting?


STOP THE YO-YO

Yo-yo dieting, also known as “weight cycling,” describes the pattern of losing weight, regaining it and then dieting again.

It’s a process that causes weight to go up and down like a yo-yo. This type of dieting is common — 10% of men and 30% of women have done it.

Losing weight causes the body to increase appetite and cling to its energy storage. As a result, some yo-yo dieters gain back more weight than they lost.

The Fasting: Those diets are making your system unstable. Fasting and Starving yourself is actually making your metabolism suffer, not counting what it is doing to your organs.

Do you have 3 days that you could part with 7 minutes to get into the best shape of your life?

You can do these exercises at home. No expense of the gym.

Check out videos on http://www.youtube.com

I Also recommend you that you drink the Vinegar Cocktail Everyday.

Vinegar, All the Wonderful Things It Can Do!

The greatest gift that will save you from dieting grows on trees and is then fermented into a beautiful bounty of goodness for your body.

Vinegar can do everything from relieving muscle pain from exercise, balancing pH levels, soothing sore throats, and normalizing weight and helping to maintain levels of cholesterol already in the normal range.

Externally, it is effective in supporting healthy skin and hair. Use it topically to give yourself a vinegar facial for toning or clearing up non-cystic acne and exfoliating dry dull skin. Gently rub your skin with a soft cotton ball dipped in vinegar and watch your skin glow!

It’s also great for animals.

Use it as a soothing after-bath rinse for cats and dogs to eliminate dry skin. Just as with people, it is also helpful in older animals. The high acidity and powerful enzymes in apple cider vinegar also supports a healthy scalp. Try a rinse of apple cider vinegar after you wash your hair. It gives hair incredible shine and bounce!

It’s so easy to incorporate vinegar into your daily diet.

When you wake up in the morning just make a delicious cocktail using 2 teaspoons of raw, organic apple cider vinegar, and if you need a sweetener, use organic honey, 100% maple syrup, or molasses to taste. If you are diabetic, use the sweet substitute stevia. I recommend you use only distilled water.

This “Bragg Healthy Cocktail” is designed to flush out wastes that are clogging the organs of elimination, the bowels, lungs, skin, and the kidneys. Take it at least twice a day, and you will start to see changes like increased energy, soft skin, and decreased muscle and joint aches from exercise.

Make sure you use raw, organic vinegar, never dead, distilled vinegar because the natural enzymes, minerals, and nutrients are destroyed in the distilling process. Any vinegar that is clear and has no “mother” (the strand-like substance in the bottom of the bottle) has no nutritional value. Natural raw vinegar should be pungent, with a rich, brownish color and a visible “mother.”

Drinking apple cider vinegar daily, and eating a largely fresh, organic, vegetarian diet, along with following a simple fitness program, will change your life so dramatically you will never go back to your old ways! Get fit, get healthy, and live a long and happy life!

You May Ask: What is Natural Apple Cider Vinegar?

Different from the refined and distilled vinegar usually found in supermarkets, Natural Apple Cider Vinegar is made from fresh, crushed, organically grown apples and allowed to mature in tanks, which boosts its natural fermentation qualities. When mature, it contains a web-like substance, called “mother” that becomes visible when the rich brownish liquid is held to the light.

Just a few more plus’s…

Ohh My Head & Tummy Are you Hungover?

Apple Cider Vinegar is believed to help the Liver dissolve poisonous matter, like to much alcohol. It also balances the pH levels and tops up any deficiency in minerals such as potassium, calcium, magnesium, sodium and iron, which your alcohol soaked body is craving.

Are your finger nails brittle and soft?

Try Bragg Apple Cider Vinegar. It all starts from the inside. You could be missing trace minerals or your PH is off. The nutrients and acids naturally found in ACV are not only great for strengthening nails, they are also known to heal and prevent microbial infections that sometimes cause excessive breakage and yellowing. You can make one of the Bragg ACV recipes or purchase bottled Bragg Healthy cocktail mixes.

More ACV Recipes from Bragg

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Super Delicious “Off the Wall” Bean Recipes #5


Super Delicious “Off the Wall” Bean Recipes #5

#5 The Black Calypso bean, also called yin yang for its distinctive and stunning white and black markings, is an heirloom variety which originated from the Caribbean.

It has a delightful nutty, slight onion flavor and a texture that is more crumbly than creamy. Simmer them very slowly so they do not break.

They are one of the best beans for baking and soups.

Calypso Beans, Tomato and Poblano Stew courtesy of Tyler Florence

Calypso Beans Pork and Pablano stew

Ingredients

  • 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 3 garlic cloves, chopped
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 ham hock
  • 1 pound dried calypso beans, soaked overnight and drained
  • 1 tablespoon ground cumin
  • 3 canned chipotle peppers in adobe sauce
  • 4 poblano chiles, roasted, seeded and chopped
  • 4 tomatoes, seeded and chopped
  • 1 bunch fresh cilantro leaves
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • Lime wedges, for garnish

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Directions

  • In a large pot over medium-high heat olive oil. When the oil is hot add the onion, garlic, bay leaf, and ham hock; cook for 5 minutes
  • Add the beans and stir in the cumin, chipotles, chiles, tomatoes, and cilantro; season with salt and pepper.
  • Pour in enough water to cover the beans by 1-inch and bring it to a boil. Cover and cook over medium-low heat until the beans are tender, about 1 hour
  • Remove the bay leaf and discard; pick the meat from the ham hock, discard the bone, and return the meat to the pot
  • Taste it and adjust the seasoning
  • Serve with lime wedges for garnish.

Recipe courtesy of Tyler Florence

If You Are In Or Approaching Retirement And You’ve Got Less Than A Million ($1,000,000) In Your Pension Fund, You’ve Got A BIG Problem

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Super Delicious “Off the Wall” Bean Recipes #8


If You Are In Or Approaching Retirement And You’ve Got Less Than A Million ($1,000,000) In Your Pension Fund, You’ve Got A BIG Problem

#8 Cranberry Bean Vermont Cranberry, Known As “Borlotti” Beans.

Popular in Italian cooking (where they’re better known as “Borlotti” beans). These beans have a mild, sweet and nutty flavor and satisfyingly creamy texture. This makes them a perfect ingredient in salads, soups, stews, spreads (hummus, anyone?), dips and other dishes.

Vermont Cranberry / “Borlotti” Beans can be harvested young as a green bean or allowed to dry.

 

Borlotti Baked Beans

Ingredients

1 pound Vermont Cranberry / “Borlotti” Beans, soaked in water overnight

¼ cup olive oil

1 cup chopped onions

½ cup pure maple syrup

½ cup canned tomato puree or crushed tomatoes

2 tablespoons molasses

1 tablespoon Dijon mustard

½ cup brown sugar

1 teaspoon salt

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Instructions

Drain beans and combine with 4 quarts fresh hot water in large pot. Bring to boil and reduce heat. Simmer, partially covered, just until tender, 1 1/2 to 2 hours. Drain, reserving cooking water. Place beans in a large, shallow baking dish.

While the beans cook, heat oil in large skillet. Sauté onions until tender. Remove from heat.

Preheat oven to 325F.

Whisk together 1 cup of reserved cooking water, maple syrup, tomato puree, molasses, mustard,  brown sugar and salt in a medium bowl.

Add sautéed onion and syrup mixture to beans; stir well. Cover dish tightly.

Bake 2 1/2 to 3 1/2 hours, until beans are tender. Check periodically to make sure they have enough liquid, adding more reserved cooking water if necessary.

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Super Delicious “Off the Wall” Bean Recipes #2


Baked Beans

This week’s pick is, “Beans with Wild exotic names”. Not your corner supermarket staple product that’s for sure. These beans can be found online and at several stores.

This is a 10 part series on beans, so have fun and enjoy.

#2 Jacobs Cattle Beans

This bean is a Prince Edward Island heirloom. Were specific to the Maritimes and New England for many years and most certainly migrated north with the Loyalists.

Though Jacob’s Cattle beans can be eaten raw when young, they are most suited as a soup and casserole bean as the beans hold their shape under long cooking, stand up well to plenty of seasoning, and possess a rich aroma when slow cooked. Cooking times will be shorter and soaking is not required when fresh. Complimentary pairings include black beans, ham, corn, chiles, tomatoes, chicken, garlic, oregano, stewed pork, cooked eggs, cream, cilantro, melting and fresh cheeses, vinegar, roasted fish, bitter and mild greens, butter and olive oil. When cooking a pot of Jacob’s Cattle beans, it is recommended to reserve the broth, which is known as “pot liquor” and often considered to be as good as the bean itself.

BAKED BEANS

  • 1 – 1 lb/454 g package dried Jacob’s Cattle Beans
  • 2 tsps (10 mL) dry mustard
  • 1/3 cup (75 L) packed brown sugar
  • 2/3 cup (150 mL) molasses
  • 1 tsp (5 mL) salt
  • ¼ tsp (1 mL) freshly ground pepper
  • 4 oz (115 g) salt pork or bacon
  • 1 tsp (5 mL) white vinegar
  • 1 medium onion, peeled and diced

Cover the beans with cold water and soak overnight. Alternately place beans in a large pot with 6 cups (1.5 L) water, cover and bring to a boil. Boil 5 minutes, remove from heat and let stand for 1 hour. Drain and discard water, then rinse.

Place drained beans in a large pot with 6 cups (1.5 L) water, after boiling for 5 minutes, reduce heat and simmer until beans are tender, about 30 minutes. Drain, reserving 1 cup (250 mL) of the liquid. Transfer to a slow cooker, bean pot or casserole with a lid. Combine the reserved water with mustard, brown sugar, molasses, salt, pepper, pork or bacon and vinegar.

Cook on high in a slow cooker or at 300’F (150’C) in the oven. Beans done in a slow cooker will take about 6 hours; in the oven from 4 to 6 hours. Add water during cooking as needed to keep beans moist.

Makes 6 servings.

Don’t Be Fooled By The EGGS Cover… Yummy for your Tummy and Body


Don’t Be Fooled By The EGGS Cover…
Eggs are so nutritious that they’re often referred to as “nature’s multivitamin.”

They also have unique antioxidants and powerful brain nutrients that many people are deficient in.

Here are some reasons why eggs are among the healthiest foods on the planet.

  • Whole Eggs Are Among The Most Nutritious Foods on Earth
  • One whole egg contains an amazing range of nutrients.
  • Just imagine… the nutrients in there are enough to turn a single fertilized cell into an entire baby chicken.
  • Eggs are loaded with vitamins, minerals, high quality proteins, good fats and various other lesser-known nutrients.
  • One large egg contains (1):
  • Vitamin B12 (Cobalamin): 9% of the RDA.
  • Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin): 15% of the RDA.
  • Vitamin A: 6% of the RDA.
  • Vitamin B5 (Pantothenic Acid): 7% of the RDA.
  • Selenium: 22% of the RDA.

Eggs also contain small amounts of almost every vitamin and mineral required by the human body… including calcium, iron, potassium, zinc, manganese, Vitamin E, Folate and many more.

A large egg contains 77 calories, with 6 grams of quality protein, 5 grams of fat and trace amounts of carbohydrates.

It’s very important to realize that almost all the nutrients are contained in the yolk, the white contains only protein.

That should make you want to eat eggs right now. But here are some more reasons why Eggs are the Healthiest Food on Earth.

  • Eggs Improve Your Cholesterol Profile and do NOT Raise Your Risk of Cardiovascular Disease
  • The main reason people have been warned about eggs is that they’re loaded with cholesterol.
  • One large egg contains 212 mg of cholesterol, which is a LOT compared to most other foods.
    However, just because a food contains cholesterol doesn’t mean that it will raise the bad cholesterol in the blood.
  • The liver actually produces cholesterol, every single day. If you eat cholesterol, then your liver produces less. If you don’t eat cholesterol, then your liver produces more of it.
  • The thing is, many studies show that eggs actually improve your cholesterol profile.
  • Eggs tend to raise HDL (the “good”) cholesterol and they tend to change the LDL (the “bad”) cholesterol to a large subtype which is not associated with an increased risk of heart disease (2, 3, 4).
  • One study discovered that 3 whole eggs per day reduced insulin resistance, raised HDL and increased the size of LDL particles in men and women with metabolic syndrome (5).
  • Multiple studies have examined the effects of egg consumption on the risk of cardiovascular disease and found no association between the two (6, 7, 8).

However, some studies do show an increased risk of cardiovascular disease in diabetic patients. This needs further research though and probably doesn’t apply on a low-carb diet, which can in many cases reverse type II diabetes (9, 10, 11).

Bottom Line: Studies show that eggs actually improve the cholesterol profile. They raise HDL (the good) cholesterol and increase the size of LDL particles, which should lower the risk of heart disease.

Eggs Are Loaded With Choline, an Important Nutrient For The Brain

  • Choline is a lesser-known nutrient that is often grouped with the B-complex vitamins.
  • Choline is an essential nutrient for human health and is needed for various processes in the body.
  • It is required to synthesize the neurotransmitter acetylcholine and is also a component of cell membranes.
  • A low choline intake has been implicated in liver diseases, cardiovascular disease and neurological disorders (12).
  • This nutrient may be especially important for pregnant women. Studies show that a low choline intake can raise the risk of neural tube defects and lead to decreased cognitive function in the offspring (13).
  • In a dietary survey in the U.S. from 2003-2004, over 90% of people ate less than the daily recommended amount of choline (14)!
  • The best sources of choline in the diet are egg yolks and beef liver. One large egg contains 113 mg of Choline.

 

Eggs Contain High Quality Proteins With a Perfect Amino Acid Profile

  • Proteins are the main building blocks of the body and serve both structural and functional purposes.
  • They consist of amino acids that are linked together, kind of like beads on a string, then folded into complex shapes.
  • There are about 21 amino acids that the body uses to build its proteins.
  • The body can not produce 9 of these amino acids, which are deemed as “essential” and must be gotten from the diet.
  • The quality of a protein source is determined by its relative amounts of these essential amino acids. A protein source that contains all of them in the right ratios is a good source of protein.
  • Eggs are among the best sources of protein in the diet. In fact, the biological value (a measure of protein quality) is often evaluated by comparing it to eggs, which are given the perfect score of 100.

Eggs Are Loaded With Lutein and Zeaxanthin, Which Protect The Eyes

  • There are two antioxidants in eggs that can have powerful protective effects on the eyes.
  • They are called Lutein and Zeaxanthin, both found in the yolk.
  • Lutein and Zeaxanthin tend to accumulate in the retina, the sensory part of the eye.
  • These antioxidants significantly reduce the risk of Macular Degeneration and Cataracts, which are among the leading causes of vision impairment and blindness in the elderly (15, 16, 17).
  • In one study, eating 1.3 egg yolks per day for 4.5 weeks increased blood levels of Zeaxanthin by 114-142% and Lutein by 28-50% (18).

 

Eggs For Breakfast Can Help You Lose Body Fat

  • Eggs contain only trace amounts of carbohydrates, but plenty of protein and fat.
  • They score very high on a scale called the Satiety Index, which is a measure of how much foods contribute to satiety (19).
  • For this reason, it is not surprising to see studies where eating eggs for breakfast leads to fat loss.
  • In one study, 30 overweight or obese women consumed either a breakfast of eggs or a breakfast of bagels. Both breakfasts had the same amount of calories.
  • The women in the egg group felt more full and ate less calories for the rest of the day and for the next 36 hours (20).

In another study that went on for 8 weeks, eating eggs for breakfast lead to significant weight improvements compared to the same amount of calories from bagels. The egg group (21):

  • Lost 65% more body weight.
  • Lost 16% more body fat.
  • Had a 61% greater reduction in BMI.
  • Had a 34% greater reduction in waist circumference (a good marker for the dangerous abdominal fat).

Not All Eggs Are The Same

It’s important to keep in mind that not all eggs are created equal.

Hens are often raised in factories, caged and fed grain-based feed that alters the final nutrient composition of the eggs. It is best to buy Omega-3 enriched or pastured eggs, they are more nutritious and healthier.

However, conventional supermarket eggs are still a good choice if you can’t afford or access the others.

To top things off, eggs are cheap, taste awesome and go with almost any food.

Eggs really are an egg-ceptional super-food.

Eggs Scrambled with Onion, Garlic and Sweet Cherry Tomatoes

Servings: 1

Sauté 1/4 sweet onion and a smashed garlic clove over medium-high heat in 1 teaspoon canola or olive oil until almost soft. Add a handful of chopped tomatoes to the pan (or any other vegetables you happen to have, such as chopped spinach, kale, mushrooms or peppers) and cook for another 5 minutes. Turn down the heat to very low. In a separate bowl, whisk two eggs. Pour eggs into the pan containing the onion, garlic and tomato — add 1 ounce low-fat cheese, if you wish. Stir continuously until eggs are cooked. Pour over toasted, whole rye bread. Bon Appitite…

American Egg Board   http://www.incredibleegg.org/

 

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Fermented Foods May Be a Key Component of an Anti-Cancer Diet



By Dr. Mercola

Slowly but surely, scientists are increasingly starting to focus on the influence of nutrition on cancer. Mounting evidence supports the notion that a diet high in healthy fats and low in net carbohydrates (total carbs minus fiber, i.e. non-fiber carbs) may significantly lower your risk by improving mitochondrial and metabolic function.

Fermented foods are also gaining recognition as an important anti-cancer adjunct. The beneficial bacteria found in fermented foods have been shown particularly effective for suppressing colon cancer, but may also inhibit cancers of the breast, liver, small intestine and other organs.

For example, butyrate, a short-chain fatty acid created when microbes ferment dietary fiber in your gut, has been shown to induce programmed cell death of colon cancer cells,1 and cultured milk products may reduce your risk of bladder cancer by about 29 percent.2

Cultured Raw Milk Does Your Body Good

In the case of cultured dairy, lactobcillus and bifidobacterium are primary sources of probiotics in cultured milk products, and these beneficial bacteria have been shown to induce changes reflecting an increase in carbohydrate metabolism.

Both of these bacteria also facilitate excretion of toxins such as Bisphenol A (BPA), and lactobacillus strains in particular may help prevent heavy metal toxicity by binding and excreting these metals.

They’ve even been shown to reduce the toxicity of heterocyclic aromatic amines (HCA) — cancer causing compounds found in charred meats.3

Kimchi (a Korean fermented cabbage dish) contains probiotics shown to help with the detoxification of organophosphorus pesticides. It also breaks down sodium nitrate, a food preservative associated with increased cancer risk.4
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Microbial Metabolism Can Influence Your Cancer Risk

Research by Johanna Lampe, Ph.D., at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center suggests microbial metabolism may affect your cancer risk for better or worse in many different ways, by influencing:5,6

DNA repair Carcinogen metabolism / detoxification Hormone regulation Inflammation
Immune function Apoptosis (programmed cell death) Microbial proliferation Microbial differentiation

Moreover, your gut microbiome — which contains 100 times as many genes as your body’s total genome — is involved in important chemical reactions that your gut enzymes cannot perform, including fermentation and sulfate reduction.

Importantly, your gut microbiome helps generate new compounds (bacterial metabolites) that can have either a beneficial or detrimental impact on your health.

On the upside, some of these compounds act as sources of energy and/or help regulate your metabolism and reduce inflammation. Others can cause oxidative stress.7

Food components known to produce beneficial bacterial metabolites include dietary fiber, plant lignans, anthocyanins and linoleic acid, just to name a few.

As noted by Lampe, “availability of nutrients or bioactive substances important for health can be influenced by gut microbiota,” and “understanding the impact of the bacterial metabolites on regulatory pathways may help guide future diet and cancer prevention strategies.”8
Chronic Inflammation Raises Your Risk for Cancer

Reducing inflammation is one important anti-cancer feature of fermented foods. As explained by Stephanie Maxson, senior clinical dietitian at MD Anderson’s Integrative Medicine Center, “Prolonged inflammation can damage your body’s healthy cells and tissue, and weaken your immune system.”

And, since your immune system is the first line of defense, a weakened immune system is what allows for diseases such as cancer to get a foothold in the first place; hence, reducing inflammation is a foundational aspect of cancer prevention.

One group of microbes that appear important for maintaining healthy immune function is the clostridial group of microbes. Ironically enough, this group is related to clostridium difficile, which can cause severe and life-threatening intestinal infections.

But whereas C. difficile prompts chronic inflammation, the clostridial clusters actually help maintain a healthy and well-functioning gut barrier, preventing inflammatory agents from entering your bloodstream.9 Factors that promote chronic inflammation in your body include but are not limited to:

  • Obesity
  • Smoking
  • Stress
  • Lack of exercise
  • Poor dietary choices

Inflammation and Microbiome Also Play a Role in Type 1 Diabetes

The connection between your microbiome and inflammation has also become evident in type 1 diabetes (insulin-dependent diabetes) which, contrary to type 2 diabetes, is an autoimmune disorder.

The root cause of type 1 diabetes has been a medical mystery, but more recent research suggests the disease may be rooted in gut dysfunction. As reported by Medical News Today:10

“[I]ndividuals with type 1 diabetes show increased intestinal permeability and changes in the microvilli, which are microscopic, finger-like projections from the gut lining. Although the reasons behind these modifications are unclear, errant gut bacteria are currently the prime suspects.”

To investigate the impact gut bacteria may have on the development of type 1 diabetes, Italian researchers examined the gut flora and inflammation levels in 54 type 1 diabetics.

All had endoscopies and biopsies taken from their duodenum, the early section of the intestinal tract, and all were on a similar diet at the time of the procedures. The results revealed they had significantly more inflammation than healthy controls and even patients diagnosed with celiac disease.

Their gut flora was also significantly different, with fewer proteobacteria (a group of organisms that includes escherichia, which help produce vitamin K, and salmonella, which is associated with food poisoning) and higher levels of firmicutes (a group of bacteria that include bacilli and streptococcus). According to the featured article:11

“The next step will be to understand whether the changes in the gut are caused by type 1 diabetes or vice versa. Either way, the study marks a step forward in our understanding of this condition.

As Piemonti notes: ‘We don’t know if type 1 diabetes’ signature effect on the gut is caused by or the result of the body’s own attacks on the pancreas.

By exploring this, we may be able to find new ways to treat the disease by targeting the unique gastrointestinal characteristics of individuals with type 1 diabetes.'”

Key Features of an Anti-Inflammatory, Anti-Cancer Diet

Many cancer experts, including MD Anderson’s Integrative Medicine Center and the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) now promote anti-inflammatory diets, placing focus on:12

  • Organic plant foods and traditionally fermented and cultured foods. AICR recommends making sure at least two-thirds of your plate are plant foods, and to eat at least one small serving of fermented food each day.
  • Limiting processed foods and eating a diet of whole, fresh foods cooked from scratch instead.
  • Avoiding sodas, sport drinks and other sugary beverages, including fruit juices.
  • Balancing your omega-3 and omega-6 ratios. For most, this means increasing your intake of animal-based omega-3 from fatty fish low in mercury and other contaminants, such as wild-caught Alaskan salmon, anchovies and sardines, and reducing consumption of omega-6 fats, abundant in refined vegetable oils (fried foods and processed foods).
  • Limiting red meat and avoiding processed meats (such as deli meats, bacon, sausage, hot dogs and pepperoni). To lower your protein consumption — which can be an important factor in everything from premature aging to cancer — consider replacing some of the red meat you eat with fish instead, which is lower in protein.

Gut Bacteria Mediate Your Risk for Certain Types of Colon Cancer

Eating a plant-based, fiber-rich diet is key for preventing colon cancer in particular, and the reason for this is directly related to the way fiber affects your gut microbiome. As recently reported by Medical News Today:13

“Studies have shown that a diet high in red and processed meats may increase the risk of colorectal cancer, while a high-fiber diet — rich in fruits, vegetables and whole grains — has been associated with a lower risk of the disease. Previous research has suggested that one way by which diet influences the risk of colorectal cancer is through the changes it makes to the gut microbiome (the population of microorganisms that live in the intestine).

The new study from Dr. [Shuji] Ogino and team supports this association, after finding that individuals who followed a high-fiber diet were at a lower risk of developing colorectal cancer tumors containing the bacterium F. nucleatum.”

F. nucleatum has been shown to be prevalent in the stool of people who eat a Western-style, low-fiber diet, and these people also have a higher risk of colon cancer. “We theorized that the link between a prudent diet and reduced colorectal cancer risk would be more evident for tumors enriched with F. nucleatum than for those without it,” Ogino says.

To test this theory, the team analyzed health and nutritional data from more than 137,200 participants in the Nurses’ Health Study and the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study. They then analyzed tumor samples obtained from participants who developed colorectal cancer during the study, to ascertain whether F. nucleatum was present.
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Food frequency questionnaires, which participants filled out at two- to four-year intervals, were used to calculate nutrient and fiber intake. Participants who ate a “prudent” diet, defined as being high in vegetables, fruits, whole grains and legumes, had a significantly reduced risk of colorectal cancer-containing F. nucleatum, compared to those who ate a Western-style, low-fiber diet.

That said, the prudent diet did not affect the risk of developing colorectal cancer that was free of F. nucleatum. According to Ogino, these findings “point to a much broader phenomenon — that intestinal bacteria can act in concert with diet to reduce or increase the risk of certain types of colorectal cancer.”14

Which Fermented Foods Have the Greatest Impact on Your Microbiome?

In a recent episode of the BBC “Trust Me, I’m a Doctor” program, 30 volunteers agreed to eat a certain type of fermented food for one month, to see how it would affect their gut microbiome. The volunteers were split into three groups, receiving either a commercial probiotic drink, traditionally fermented kefir or inulin-rich foods such as Jerusalem artichokes, chicory root, onions, garlic and leek. (Inulin is a prebiotic fiber.) As reported by the BBC:15

“What we found at the end of our study was fascinating. The group consuming the probiotic drink saw a small change in one bacteria type known to be good for weight management, bacteria called lachnospiraceae. However, this change wasn’t statistically significant. But our other two groups did see significant changes. The group eating foods rich in prebiotic fiber saw a rise in a type of bacteria known to be good for general gut health — something that is in line with other studies.

Our biggest change, however, was in the kefir group. These volunteers saw a rise in a family of bacteria called lactobacillales. We know that some of these bacteria are good for our overall gut health and that they can help conditions such as traveler’s diarrhea and lactose intolerance.”

Store-Bought Versus Homemade

Next, the BBC team sent out a variety of homemade and store-bought fermented foods and beverages for laboratory testing, which revealed “striking differences” in microbial composition. Not surprisingly, the store-bought versions contained very minute levels of beneficial bacteria, while the homemade versions were rich in a wide array of probiotics.

One of the primary reasons for this difference has to do with the fact that commercial products are pasteurized to prolong shelf-life and ensure safety, and pasteurization kills the very bacteria the products are supposed to supply.

This is precisely why I strongly recommend making sure you’re buying traditionally fermented, unpasteurized products or, better yet, make them yourself. It’s far easier than you might think, and can save you a lot of money to boot. For basic instructions, see my previous article, “How to Make Your Own Fermented Vegetables,” or watch the video demonstration below.

Nourish Your Microbiome to Optimize Your Health

Mounting research suggests that your microbiome — colonies of bacteria, viruses and other microbes living in your gut — may be one of the preeminent factors determining your health and longevity.

Hence, feeding beneficial gut bacteria with a healthy, fiber-rich diet and fermented foods, and boycotting processed foods and animal foods raised in confined animal feeding operations (CAFOs) — both of which tend to have an adverse effect on your microbiome — may be keystone strategies for optimal health and disease prevention, including cancer.
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