AMERICA, CODE BLUE… Young Pregnant Women Down!


USA Reports: Cardiac Arrest In Younger Pregnant Women Is On The Rise

BY: Chad Rhodes

NYU – School Of Medicine has conducted a study for the past 12 years on Heart Disease in pregnant women. Between 2002 and 2014 Cardiac Arrest has been the leading cause of death for 25% of young pregnant women. Heart Disease has been the number one cause of death for women for many years, but for younger women this is a drastic change compared to earlier years.

The disease in young women has been increasing and raising great concerns not only for the mother, but for the health of the unborn child also.  The risk factors for heart disease continue to increase in the United States. “High blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes are all higher in our younger women. Stress is another factor in High Risk pregnancy.

Rise in obesity in society plays a big part. Between more junk food available and the convenience of the “Drive Thru food”. Adding yeast to many packaged food and many drinks also.

Don’t get me started on Soda. This is a heart Killer, Diet KILLER.

You could ask if the younger women are getting enough “Quality” exercise, food and fluid intake. We all know with our busy lives exercise is the last thing we want to do after work all day. Making a wholesome meal for the family is about all the energy you can muster up. You end up asking yourself, where do I fit the time in?

The family entrees from the frozen section become your main staples. The concentrated amounts of sodium and preservatives is off the charts. Not only are you adding all this to your body that is creating it’s own voyage of problems to your heart risk factors.

Exercise does not have to mean Hitting the Gym 3 times a week. You can walk, band workout and create a new healthy diet. Include fresh home cooked meals that are lean, ending bad calorie intake.

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Healthy Ingredients

Get the kids to help you in the kitchen with dinner. Bringing your kids up with healthy choices makes their lifestyle an asset to their healthy future. Kids are great for washing the vegetables and mixing things up relieves you from 30 minutes of stress and time.

Most parents can not spend hours away from the kids, house or work. My solution is to incorporate the kids activities with yours.

Weekends are a good place to start. Take the kids for a walk every morning, that gets all of you on the road to increased blood flow through your body. As we all know the heart needs lots of exercise and if you sit for 8 hours a day, you need this more than those who stand up for work.

The U.K. Side

BJOG: UK Reports, Nearly one in four cardiac arrests in pregnancy are associated with complications of obstetric anesthesia.

Nearly one in four cardiac arrests in pregnancy are associated with complications of obstetric anesthesia, according to a new study published today (Friday 24 February) in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology (BJOG).

The aim of this study was to estimate the incidence of cardiac arrest in the UK obstetric population, describe how cardiac arrest in pregnancy is managed and report maternal and fetal outcomes. Using the UK Obstetric Surveillance System (UKOSS), researchers identified 66 women who had experienced a cardiac arrest in pregnancy among 2.3 million who gave birth between 2011 and 2014.

The three year study shows that maternal cardiac arrest in the UK is very rare (a 1 in 36,000 risk) and that maternal survival rates of 58% were possible due to timely resuscitation and rapid perimortem caesarean section (PMCS). In the 66 women involved in the study, cardiac output was restored in 48 and 49 women had a PMCS. The results also show that time from collapse to PMCS was significantly shorter in women who survived. 58 babies were delivered, 12 were stillborn.

Results found that the main association of collapse among antenatal women was obstetric anesthesia, given as an epidural, spinal or combined spinal-epidural. 16 (24%) of the women in the study had a cardiac arrest following obstetric anesthesia (all survived).

Meanwhile, 12 of the 16 women (75%) who had a cardiac arrest following obstetric anesthesia were obese (defined as having a Body Mass Index of 30kg/m2 or more). This supports the view that obese pregnant women are at a higher risk of complications of anesthesia, as the increased body fat makes procedures technically more difficult.

The study also shows that hypovolaemia (a decrease in blood volume), venous thromboembolism (a formation of blood clots in the vein) and amniotic fluid embolism (when amniotic fluid or other debris makes its way into the mother’s blood) are the main non-anaesthetic causes of cardiac arrest. As recommended in the most recent MBRRACE-UK report, there is a pressing need to improve systems focused on preventing and responding appropriately to these complications.”

In addition, of the 66 women who arrested in pregnancy, 27 had co-morbidities which may have contributed to maternal arrest. The most common problems reported were asthma, mental health problems, cardiac disease, hypertension, hematological, autoimmune and endocrine problems.

The researchers suggest a revision of multi-disciplinary training for healthcare professionals, and a revision of supervision and support on the labor ward.

Dr Virginia Beckett, lead author and consultant obstetrician and gynecologist at Bradford Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, said:

“Our study shows that management of cardiac arrest in pregnancy in the UK, following the introduction of training such as the Managing Obstetric Emergencies and Trauma (MOET) course, has resulted in a 58% maternal survival rate. The main reasons for this appear to be the involvement of senior medical professionals and swift PMCS.

“American data shows that up to one third of women who arrest die with their baby still in utero. In the UK, we take a very different approach; in this study, PMCS was carried out in 49 (74%) of the 66 women involved (only two women remained undelivered when they should have had a PMCS). This is close to a five-fold improvement. Rapid PMCS saves women’s lives.

“However, our study shows that the single, biggest association of maternal cardiac arrest is a complication of anesthesia. Further research is needed into this finding which presents an opportunity to reduce the incidence of maternal cardiac in the UK.

Mr Edward Morris, Vice President for Clinical Quality at the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (RCOG), said:

“This study demonstrates the importance of robust multi-disciplinary risk assessment processes in antenatal care, as well as team training to manage obstetric emergencies. It is also a great example of the value of collecting high quality data through UKOSS to improve outcomes for patients.

“Childbirth can be unpredictable and timely access to specialist care is critical; especially for those considered at higher risk due to per-existing health conditions. This data supports existing evidence that maternal cardiac arrest is becoming more common, and there may be opportunities to further improve survival rates through detailed analysis of this data.

“Obesity has reached pandemic proportions globally, with around one in five pregnant women in the UK considered obese. This increases their risk of miscarriage, stillbirth and neonatal death as well gestational diabetes, blood clots, per-eclampsia, more complicated labors, and severe bleeding after the birth. Although they survived, a high proportion of the women who had cardiac arrests following obstetric anesthesia were obese.

“Maintaining a normal body weight can reduce the risk of complications for both mother and baby. Women should keep active and eat well prior to conception and limit weight gain during pregnancy in order to improve their own health and provide their baby with the best start in life.”

Mr Michael Masch, Deputy Editor-in-chief of BJOG, added:

“Although about 60 percent of women survived, and most received timely resuscitation and perimortem caesarean section, this study highlights the necessity for regular multi-disciplinary training in specific arrest management. Further research into the links between anesthesia and cardiac arrest is also warranted.”

Ends

For media inquiries or copies of the study please contact the RCOG press office on 020 7772 6357 or email .

Notes to editors:

VA Beckett, M Knight, and P Sharpe. The CAPS Study: Incidence, management and outcomes of cardiac arrest in pregnancy in the UK: a prospective, descriptive study. BJOG 2017: DOI: 10.1111/1471-0528.14521

The article can be found here: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1471-0528.14521/full

This study was funded by a grant from Wellbeing of Women.

BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology is owned by the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (RCOG) but is editorially independent and published monthly by Wiley. The journal features original, peer-reviewed, high-quality medical research in all areas of obstetrics and gynecology worldwide. Please quote ‘BJOG’ or ‘BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology’ when referring to the journal. To keep up to date with our latest papers, follow @BJOGTweets.

The Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists is a medical charity that champions the provision of high quality women’s healthcare in the UK and beyond. It is dedicated to encouraging the study and advancing the science and practice of obstetrics and gynecology. It does this through postgraduate medical education and training and the publication of clinical guidelines and reports on aspects of the specialty and service provision.

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Eating Clean Does Not Mean Starving Yourself


23 Ways To Eat Clean

Replace processed, fake foods with these healthier clean eating foods.

Cleaner, healthier eating

Healthy eating isn’t always easy, especially with junk foods tempting you at the grocery store, corner deli, and even the office kitchen. Though clean eating at every meal isn’t always realistic, you can take steps to limit processed food. Here, we show how common foods morph from real (i.e. apples) to highly processed (apple toaster pastries).

Has YOUR Diet been High Jacked by the manufactures? The #1 reason your belly fat won’t go away is Hidden SUGAR! Manufactures have replaced sugar with Corn Syrup, Artificial Sugar Syrup and other sugar substitutes. Read your labels. Same for sodium. Your goal: Choose from natural foods as often as possible, go with foods that are somewhat processed in a pinch, and limit your intake of highly processed items to none.

1. Apples
1st choice (natural state): Apple
2nd choice (somewhat processed): Applesauce
Limit (highly processed): Apple toaster pastry
Shopping tip: While applesauce is a healthy choice, it has fewer nutrients than a whole apple.

2. Oranges
1st choice (natural state): Orange
2nd choice (somewhat processed): 100% orange juice
Limit (highly processed): Orange drink
Shopping tip: Many fruit drinks contain high fructose corn syrup and little real juice.

3. Strawberries
1st choice (natural state): Fresh strawberries
2nd choice (somewhat processed): Strawberry preserves
Limit to NONE (highly processed): Strawberry gelatin dessert
Shopping tip: Gelatin desserts usually contain artificial strawberry flavor, not real fruit.

4. Peaches
1st choice (natural state): Peach
2nd choice (somewhat processed): Canned peaches in 100% juice
Limit (highly processed): Canned peaches in heavy syrup
Shopping tip: Fruit canned in heavy syrup has more sugar and calories than fresh fruit.

5. Figs
1st choice (natural state): Fresh figs
2nd choice (somewhat processed): Fig preserves
Limit (highly processed): Fig sandwich cookies
Shopping tip: Packaged fruit cookies may contain refined sugar and preservatives.

6. Pineapple
1st choice (natural state): Pineapple
2nd choice (somewhat processed): Canned diced pineapple
Limit (highly processed): Pineapple cocktail cup
Shopping tip: Fresh pineapple is higher in vitamins C and A and beta-carotene than canned.

7. Corn
1st choice (natural state): Corn on the cob
2nd choice (somewhat processed): Corn tortilla chips
Limit (highly processed): Cornflakes
Shopping tip: Buy tortilla chips with just three ingredients: whole corn, oil, and salt—and eat in moderation with Fresh Homemade Salsa or Pica De Gallo.

8. Spinach
1st choice (natural state): Spinach
2nd choice (somewhat processed): Bagged prewashed spinach
Limit (highly processed): Frozen creamed spinach
Shopping tip: When buying frozen vegetables, avoid those packaged with sodium-rich sauces. Buy plain and add your own light sauce. (Is spinach healthier than kale? Find out in their Health Food Face-Off.)

9. Garlic
1st choice (natural state): Garlic
2nd choice (somewhat processed): Jarred minced garlic
Limit (highly processed): Bottled garlic marinade
Shopping tip: Minced fresh garlic is cheaper and more flavorful than jarred.

You Shouldn’t Toss Sprouted Garlic out. Plant it in your garden to keep pests away.

10. Carrots
1st choice (natural state): Carrots
2nd choice (somewhat processed): Baby carrots
Limit (highly processed): Frozen honey-glazed carrots
Shopping tip: Baby carrots are healthy but more expensive than regular-size loose carrots.

11. Soup
1st choice (natural state): Soup from scratch
2nd choice (somewhat processed): Canned soup
Limit (highly processed): Dehydrated soup mix
Shopping tip: Homemade soup often has less sodium and more flavor than canned.

12. HAM
1st choice (natural state): Heritage ham
2nd choice (somewhat processed): Deli ham
Limit (highly processed): Packaged deli bologna
Shopping tip: Heritage varieties of pork are much less likely to contain hormones than factory meat is.

13. Turkey
1st choice (natural ttate): Whole turkey
2nd choice (somewhat processed): Deli turkey
Limit (highly processed): Store-bought turkey meatballs
Shopping tip: If you buy turkey and other meats at the deli counter, ask for brands free of fillers and nitrates.

14. Beef
1st choice (natural state): Grass-fed beef
2nd choice (somewhat processed): Grain-fed beef
Limit (highly processed): Frozen beef patties
Shopping tip: Grass-fed meat is higher in nutrients and lower in fat than grain-fed beef.

15. Chicken
1st choice (natural state): Fresh chicken breasts
2nd choice (somewhat processed): Deli sliced chicken
Limit (highly processed): Chicken nuggets
Shopping tip: Chicken nuggets contain very little real chicken.

16. Eggs
1st choice (natural state): Pasture-raised eggs
2nd choice (somewhat processed): Omega-3-fortified eggs
Limit (highly processed): Egg beaters
Shopping Tip: Pasture-raised eggs may have 35% less saturated fat, 60% more vitamin A, and 200% more omega-3s compared to omega-3-fortified eggs and egg beaters, which come from chickens kept in coops.

17. Cream
1st choice (natural state): Cream
2nd choice (somewhat processed): Fat-free half cream / half milk
Limit (highly processed): Flavored dairy creamer
Shopping tip: Flavored dairy creamers are often made with colorings, artificial flavors, and corn syrup.

18. Yogurt
1st choice (natural state): Organic 100% Natural Plain yogurt no sugar added with Fresh Fruit
2nd choice (somewhat processed): Flavored yogurt
Limit (highly processed): Flavored yogurt drink
Shopping tip: Buy plain yogurt and flavor it at home with honey or fresh fruit.

19. Bread
1st choice (natural state): Whole grain bread
2nd choice (somewhat processed): Wheat bread
Limit (highly processed): Fortified white bread
Shopping tip: If a whole grain isn’t the first ingredient, you’re missing out on nutrients.
20. Pasta
1st choice (natural state): Dried whole wheat pasta
2nd choice (somewhat processed): Dried white pasta
Limit (highly processed): Instant noodles, Simen, Mac & Cheese
Shopping tip: Whole grain pasta is higher in antioxidants than white or instant noodles.

21. Brown
1st choice (natural state): Brown rice
2nd choice (somewhat processed): White rice
Limit (highly processed): Flavored instant rice
Shopping tip: Brown rice, unlike white, hasn’t had its fiber-rich layers of bran and germ removed.

22. Peanuts
1st choice (natural state): Peanuts
2nd choice (somewhat processed): Natural peanut butter
Limit (highly processed): Processed peanut butter
Shopping tip: Natural peanut butter should contain only peanuts and a dash of salt.

23. Soy
1st choice (natural state): Fresh edamame (whole soybeans)
2nd choice (somewhat processed): Tofu
Limit (highly processed): Frozen veggie burgers (containing soy ingredients)
Shopping tip: Frozen veggie burgers are vegetarian-friendly but are highly processed.

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It has been shown that eating a correct diet of clean foods can lessen the impact of depression and several other illnesses.

 

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Super Delicious “Off the Wall” Bean Recipes #9


Super Delicious “Off the Wall” Bean Recipes #9

#9 JAPANESE HOKKAIDO AZUKI BEANS

Grown in the rich volcanic soil of Hokkaido, the cold northernmost island of Japan.

Their deep, burgundy sheen will attest to their nutritious quality and flavor.

Anko, sweet red bean paste, is used in many baked goods and sweet treats in Japan.  It is usually prepared by boiling and sometimes mashing azuki beans and then sweetening the paste with sugar.  The most common types of read bean paste include Tsubuan and Koshian.

Tsubuan is prepared by boiling and sweetening with sugar.  Koshian is prepared by passing through a sieve to remove bean skins, and this is most commonly used for wagashi (traditional Japanese confectionery).

Other varieties of anko includes Shiroan, made from Japanese white beans and Kurian made from chestnuts.

Anko is used in Anmitsu, Daifuku, Dango, Dorayaki, Oshiruko / Zenzai, Taiyaki, Manju, and Yokan.

How To Make Anko (Red Bean Paste)

Ingredients

  • 200g (7 oz, a little bit less than 1 cup which is 220g) Azuki beans (Today I used Hokkaido Dainagon Azuki Beans (bigger than regular azuki))
  • Water
  • 200g (7 oz, 1 cup) granulated white sugar
  • Pinch of salt

 

Instructions

  • Soak the azuki beans overnight (8-12 hours).
  • Rinse azuki beans.
  • Use a big saucepan/pot because the amount of azuki beans will double after cooking. Put washed azuki beans in the pot and pour water till 1-2 inch above azuki beans. Turn the heat on high.
  • When boiling, turn off the heat and cover with lid. Let it stand for 5 minutes.
  • Throw away water and put the azuki beans into a sieve.
  • Put the azuki beans back in the pot. Add enough water just to cover the beans and turn the heat on high. Once boiling, turn down the heat to medium low and keep it simmering.
  • Once in a while push the azuki beans under the water with slotted spoon. Water will evaporate so you need to keep adding water to cover just above the beans. If you put too much water, the beans will move and break. If you need to leave the kitchen, make sure to turn off the heat. Cook for 1+ hour.
  • Pick one azuki bean and squeeze it with your fingers. If it is smashes easily, it’s done.
  • Turn up the heat to high and add sugar in 3 separate times. Stirring constantly. When you draw a line on the bottom of the saucepan and see the bottom for more than 2 seconds, add salt and turn off heat. Anko will thicken more when it cools.

Anko is ready to use. If you’re not using right away, put it in an airtight container to cool down. Once it’s cooled, keep in the fridge or freezer. I recommend storing it in small 100g packages. Wrap each anko in plastic wrap and store in a Ziploc Freezer bag. Homemade anko can be stored in the fridge for a week and freezer up to a month

 

 

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Super Delicious “Off the Wall” Bean Recipes #6


Super Delicious “Off the Wall” Bean Recipes #6

       Homestyle Baked Beans

#6 The Sunset Runner Bean has been grown in America as early as 1750, but originated in the mountains of Central America. It is a flowering heirloom bean with unique salmon-pink blossoms which can be used as an ornamental climber.

It produces flavorful beans with a distinct flavor that can be used in soups, salads and baked bean dishes.

Ingredients

2-3 cups SUNSET RUNNER BEANS

2 Tbs. extra virgin olive oil

1 medium onion, chopped

½ cup celery, chopped

2 cloves garlic, peeled and crushed

1 leek, cleaned and chopped

3 carrot, peeled and chopped

2 turnips, peeled and chopped

1 cup mushrooms, sliced (optional)

2 zucchini, sliced

3 medium potatoes, peeled and chopped

2 to 3 cans chicken or beef broth

1 Tbs. dried basil

2 Tbs. dried parsley or 3 Tbs. fresh parsley, chopped

Pinch of sage

2 cups chopped cabbage

½ cup dried pasta

salt and pepper to taste

Instructions

1. Rinse and pick over beans. In a large pot, pour three cups boiling water over beans, cover, and let sit for one hour. Drain, add fresh water to cover by one inch and simmer until tender, not mushy. Start checking the tenderness at 45 minutes. Drain cooked beans when reach desired tenderness.

2. In a large pot, heat 2 Tbs. Olive Oil and add onion, celery, garlic, leek, carrots, turnips, mushrooms (if using), zucchini, and potatoes. Sauté all vegetables over low heat until wilted.

3. Add beans to the pot and 2 to 3 cans chicken or beef broth with enough water to cover the beans by an inch or so.

4. Add dried basil, parsley and a pinch of sage. Bring to a boil, turn down to simmer and cook for 2 hours or until beans are tender.

5. Once beans are tender you can add cabbage and a handful of dried pasta and cook until pasta is tender. Salt and pepper to taste.

Servings : 6-8

Super Delicious “Off the Wall” Bean Recipes #7


Super Delicious “Off the Wall” Bean Recipes #7

#7 Christmas Lima Beans

The alluring burgundy mottled, chestnut-flavored Christmas Lima is part of Peru’s heirloom bean lineage. One can serve cooked limas as an appetizer, side dish or main course embellished with butter, garlic and fresh parsley.

A favorite in kitchens around the world, Christmas lima beans boast a rich, mellow chestnut flavor and a firm texture.

Be sure to soak the beans before cooking. To soak overnight, place the beans in a large pot and add water to cover by 2 inches. The next day, drain the beans and cook as directed below. For a quick soak, place the beans in a large pot and add water to cover by 2 inches. Bring to a boil over high heat, remove from the heat, cover the pot and let stand for 1 hour, then drain the beans and cook. To decrease the cooking time by about half, cook the soaked beans in a pressure cooker on high pressure.

Ingredients:

2 cup dried Christmas lima beans, picked over, rinsed, soaked and drained

1/2 small yellow onion

1 carrot, cut in half crosswise

1 celery stalk, cut in half crosswise

1 fresh thyme sprig

1 bay leaf

Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste

1/4 cup red wine vinegar

1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil

1/4 cup chopped mixed fresh herbs, such as parsley, chives, tarragon, chervil, marjoram and oregano

1/3 cup finely diced red onion

1/3 cup finely diced carrot

1/3 cup finely diced celery

Fresh lemon juice, to taste

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Directions:

Place the beans in a large pot and add water to cover by 2 inches. Add the yellow onion, carrot and celery pieces, thyme sprig and bay leaf. Bring to a simmer over medium-high heat, reduce the heat to medium-low and simmer, stirring occasionally, until the beans are tender, 1 to 1 1/2 hours. Season with salt and pepper, then drain the beans. Remove and discard the yellow onion, carrot, celery, thyme sprig and bay leaf. Transfer the beans to a bowl.

Meanwhile, in a small bowl, whisk together the vinegar, olive oil and chopped herbs. Season the vinaigrette with salt and pepper.

Add the vinaigrette, diced red onion, carrot and celery to the beans and stir to combine. Refrigerate for 1 hour, stirring occasionally to evenly distribute the vinaigrette. Just before serving, adjust the seasonings with salt and pepper and stir in lemon juice. Serve chilled or at room temperature. Serves 4 to 6.   Williams-Sonoma Kitchen.

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