AMERICA, CODE BLUE… Young Pregnant Women Down!


USA Reports: Cardiac Arrest In Younger Pregnant Women Is On The Rise

BY: Chad Rhodes

NYU – School Of Medicine has conducted a study for the past 12 years on Heart Disease in pregnant women. Between 2002 and 2014 Cardiac Arrest has been the leading cause of death for 25% of young pregnant women. Heart Disease has been the number one cause of death for women for many years, but for younger women this is a drastic change compared to earlier years.

The disease in young women has been increasing and raising great concerns not only for the mother, but for the health of the unborn child also.  The risk factors for heart disease continue to increase in the United States. “High blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes are all higher in our younger women. Stress is another factor in High Risk pregnancy.

Rise in obesity in society plays a big part. Between more junk food available and the convenience of the “Drive Thru food”. Adding yeast to many packaged food and many drinks also.

Don’t get me started on Soda. This is a heart Killer, Diet KILLER.

You could ask if the younger women are getting enough “Quality” exercise, food and fluid intake. We all know with our busy lives exercise is the last thing we want to do after work all day. Making a wholesome meal for the family is about all the energy you can muster up. You end up asking yourself, where do I fit the time in?

The family entrees from the frozen section become your main staples. The concentrated amounts of sodium and preservatives is off the charts. Not only are you adding all this to your body that is creating it’s own voyage of problems to your heart risk factors.

Exercise does not have to mean Hitting the Gym 3 times a week. You can walk, band workout and create a new healthy diet. Include fresh home cooked meals that are lean, ending bad calorie intake.

IMG_4241

Healthy Ingredients

Get the kids to help you in the kitchen with dinner. Bringing your kids up with healthy choices makes their lifestyle an asset to their healthy future. Kids are great for washing the vegetables and mixing things up relieves you from 30 minutes of stress and time.

Most parents can not spend hours away from the kids, house or work. My solution is to incorporate the kids activities with yours.

Weekends are a good place to start. Take the kids for a walk every morning, that gets all of you on the road to increased blood flow through your body. As we all know the heart needs lots of exercise and if you sit for 8 hours a day, you need this more than those who stand up for work.

The U.K. Side

BJOG: UK Reports, Nearly one in four cardiac arrests in pregnancy are associated with complications of obstetric anesthesia.

Nearly one in four cardiac arrests in pregnancy are associated with complications of obstetric anesthesia, according to a new study published today (Friday 24 February) in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology (BJOG).

The aim of this study was to estimate the incidence of cardiac arrest in the UK obstetric population, describe how cardiac arrest in pregnancy is managed and report maternal and fetal outcomes. Using the UK Obstetric Surveillance System (UKOSS), researchers identified 66 women who had experienced a cardiac arrest in pregnancy among 2.3 million who gave birth between 2011 and 2014.

The three year study shows that maternal cardiac arrest in the UK is very rare (a 1 in 36,000 risk) and that maternal survival rates of 58% were possible due to timely resuscitation and rapid perimortem caesarean section (PMCS). In the 66 women involved in the study, cardiac output was restored in 48 and 49 women had a PMCS. The results also show that time from collapse to PMCS was significantly shorter in women who survived. 58 babies were delivered, 12 were stillborn.

Results found that the main association of collapse among antenatal women was obstetric anesthesia, given as an epidural, spinal or combined spinal-epidural. 16 (24%) of the women in the study had a cardiac arrest following obstetric anesthesia (all survived).

Meanwhile, 12 of the 16 women (75%) who had a cardiac arrest following obstetric anesthesia were obese (defined as having a Body Mass Index of 30kg/m2 or more). This supports the view that obese pregnant women are at a higher risk of complications of anesthesia, as the increased body fat makes procedures technically more difficult.

The study also shows that hypovolaemia (a decrease in blood volume), venous thromboembolism (a formation of blood clots in the vein) and amniotic fluid embolism (when amniotic fluid or other debris makes its way into the mother’s blood) are the main non-anaesthetic causes of cardiac arrest. As recommended in the most recent MBRRACE-UK report, there is a pressing need to improve systems focused on preventing and responding appropriately to these complications.”

In addition, of the 66 women who arrested in pregnancy, 27 had co-morbidities which may have contributed to maternal arrest. The most common problems reported were asthma, mental health problems, cardiac disease, hypertension, hematological, autoimmune and endocrine problems.

The researchers suggest a revision of multi-disciplinary training for healthcare professionals, and a revision of supervision and support on the labor ward.

Dr Virginia Beckett, lead author and consultant obstetrician and gynecologist at Bradford Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, said:

“Our study shows that management of cardiac arrest in pregnancy in the UK, following the introduction of training such as the Managing Obstetric Emergencies and Trauma (MOET) course, has resulted in a 58% maternal survival rate. The main reasons for this appear to be the involvement of senior medical professionals and swift PMCS.

“American data shows that up to one third of women who arrest die with their baby still in utero. In the UK, we take a very different approach; in this study, PMCS was carried out in 49 (74%) of the 66 women involved (only two women remained undelivered when they should have had a PMCS). This is close to a five-fold improvement. Rapid PMCS saves women’s lives.

“However, our study shows that the single, biggest association of maternal cardiac arrest is a complication of anesthesia. Further research is needed into this finding which presents an opportunity to reduce the incidence of maternal cardiac in the UK.

Mr Edward Morris, Vice President for Clinical Quality at the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (RCOG), said:

“This study demonstrates the importance of robust multi-disciplinary risk assessment processes in antenatal care, as well as team training to manage obstetric emergencies. It is also a great example of the value of collecting high quality data through UKOSS to improve outcomes for patients.

“Childbirth can be unpredictable and timely access to specialist care is critical; especially for those considered at higher risk due to per-existing health conditions. This data supports existing evidence that maternal cardiac arrest is becoming more common, and there may be opportunities to further improve survival rates through detailed analysis of this data.

“Obesity has reached pandemic proportions globally, with around one in five pregnant women in the UK considered obese. This increases their risk of miscarriage, stillbirth and neonatal death as well gestational diabetes, blood clots, per-eclampsia, more complicated labors, and severe bleeding after the birth. Although they survived, a high proportion of the women who had cardiac arrests following obstetric anesthesia were obese.

“Maintaining a normal body weight can reduce the risk of complications for both mother and baby. Women should keep active and eat well prior to conception and limit weight gain during pregnancy in order to improve their own health and provide their baby with the best start in life.”

Mr Michael Masch, Deputy Editor-in-chief of BJOG, added:

“Although about 60 percent of women survived, and most received timely resuscitation and perimortem caesarean section, this study highlights the necessity for regular multi-disciplinary training in specific arrest management. Further research into the links between anesthesia and cardiac arrest is also warranted.”

Ends

For media inquiries or copies of the study please contact the RCOG press office on 020 7772 6357 or email .

Notes to editors:

VA Beckett, M Knight, and P Sharpe. The CAPS Study: Incidence, management and outcomes of cardiac arrest in pregnancy in the UK: a prospective, descriptive study. BJOG 2017: DOI: 10.1111/1471-0528.14521

The article can be found here: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1471-0528.14521/full

This study was funded by a grant from Wellbeing of Women.

BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology is owned by the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (RCOG) but is editorially independent and published monthly by Wiley. The journal features original, peer-reviewed, high-quality medical research in all areas of obstetrics and gynecology worldwide. Please quote ‘BJOG’ or ‘BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology’ when referring to the journal. To keep up to date with our latest papers, follow @BJOGTweets.

The Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists is a medical charity that champions the provision of high quality women’s healthcare in the UK and beyond. It is dedicated to encouraging the study and advancing the science and practice of obstetrics and gynecology. It does this through postgraduate medical education and training and the publication of clinical guidelines and reports on aspects of the specialty and service provision.

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Everyone Affected By Kilauea Volcano Eruption Should Be Doing This Every Night…


It’s an amazing gift the body has given to us to use.

You can DETOX YOUR BODY EVERY NIGHT NATURALLY.

BEST OF ALL “IT’S FREE

We all have a personal “Dump System” in our bodies.

Right now we need all the help we can get to dump some of these toxins from our for awhile from our locally grown food . We can’t stop eating, So we need to learn how to survive with a healthy body when it is all said and done.

If we all would just take 10 minutes a day or fall asleep on your left side every night.

Natural Detoxing is the safest and easiest way to clean your vital organs from toxins.


Amazing Benefits of Sleeping on Your Left Side

Here are some reasons for Sleeping on your left side:

  • Facilitates lymphatic drainage from your brain
  • Makes it easier for the heart to pump downhill
  • Better elimination
  • Supports healthy spleen function
  • Encourages proper digestion
  • Helps circulation back to the heart
  • Helps bile flow more freely

about ½ inch long. drains lymph from upper right side of body. Thoracic (left) duct. main collecting duct of lymph system cm long. drains 75% of body. begins as a dilation known as cisterna chyli located anterior to lumbar disk #2.

The Lymph Drains toward the Left

The left side of the body is the dominant lymphatic side. Seventy-five percent of the body’s lymph fluid drains into the thoracic duct, which drains into the left side of the heart, left internal jugular vein, and left subclavian vein. Lymph fluid carrying proteins, glucose, other metabolites, and waste products is cleansed and then drained into the left side of the heart.

The small intestine dumps waste through the ileocecal valve (ICV) on the right side of the body into the beginning of the large intestine. The large intestine travels up the right side of the belly across the tummy, where it dumps waste into the descending colon on the left side.

Sleeping on the left side allows gravity to encourage the food waste to move more easily from the small intestine into the large intestine through the ICV.

During sleep on your left side, the waste moves more easily into the descending colon. With the help of gravity and a good night’s sleep on the left side, the descending colon is full of waste and ready to easily and completely eliminate in the morning.

One of the biggest players on the left side is the heart. If you sleep on your left side, the lymph drainage toward the heart will, again, be helped by gravity, taking some of the workload off of the heart as you sleep.

The aorta, the biggest artery in the body, leaves the top of the heart and arches to the left before it heads down into the abdomen. By sleeping on the left side, the heart is pumping its biggest payload downhill into the descending aorta.

Sleeping on the left also allows much of the intestines to hang away from the very thin-walled inferior vena cava (IVC), which brings venous blood back toward the heart. Interestingly, the IVC lies against the right side of the spine, so when you lie on the left, much of the viscera falls away from the IVC. Here again, gravity is just making the heart’s job a little easier.

The spleen, which is part of the lymphatic system, is also on the left. The spleen is much like a gigantic lymph node, except that in addition to filtering lymph, it also filters blood. When you lay on the left side, drainage back to the spleen is once again helped and made easier by gravity.

FACT; the lymph system drains all the cells in the body via movement and muscular contractions, rather than being pumped by the heart. Helping the lymph to drain to the spleen and heart with gravity is a good thing!

Very good for pregnant women

SHORT AND SWEET>>> SLEEP ON YOUR LEFT SIDE…

 

Reasons Why You Should Sleep On Your Left Side


Amazing Benefits of Sleeping on Your Left Side

Here are some reasons for Sleeping on your left side:

  • Facilitates lymphatic drainage from your brain
  • Makes it easier for the heart to pump downhill
  • Better elimination
  • Supports healthy spleen function
  • Encourages proper digestion
  • Helps circulation back to the heart
  • Helps bile flow more freely

about ½ inch long. drains lymph from upper right side of body. Thoracic (left) duct. main collecting duct of lymph system cm long. drains 75% of body. begins as a dilation known as cisterna chyli located anterior to lumbar disk #2.

The Lymph Drains toward the Left

The left side of the body is the dominant lymphatic side. Seventy-five percent of the body’s lymph fluid drains into the thoracic duct, which drains into the left side of the heart, left internal jugular vein, and left subclavian vein. Lymph fluid carrying proteins, glucose, other metabolites, and waste products is cleansed and then drained into the left side of the heart.

The small intestine dumps waste through the ileocecal valve (ICV) on the right side of the body into the beginning of the large intestine. The large intestine travels up the right side of the belly across the tummy, where it dumps waste into the descending colon on the left side.

Sleeping on the left side allows gravity to encourage the food waste to move more easily from the small intestine into the large intestine through the ICV.

During sleep on your left side, the waste moves more easily into the descending colon. With the help of gravity and a good night’s sleep on the left side, the descending colon is full of waste and ready to easily and completely eliminate in the morning.

 

 

One of the biggest players on the left side is the heart. If you sleep on your left side, the lymph drainage toward the heart will, again, be helped by gravity, taking some of the workload off of the heart as you sleep.

The aorta, the biggest artery in the body, leaves the top of the heart and arches to the left before it heads down into the abdomen. By sleeping on the left side, the heart is pumping its biggest payload downhill into the descending aorta.

Sleeping on the left also allows much of the intestines to hang away from the very thin-walled inferior vena cava (IVC), which brings venous blood back toward the heart. Interestingly, the IVC lies against the right side of the spine, so when you lie on the left, much of the viscera falls away from the IVC. Here again, gravity is just making the heart’s job a little easier.

The spleen, which is part of the lymphatic system, is also on the left. The spleen is much like a gigantic lymph node, except that in addition to filtering lymph, it also filters blood. When you lay on the left side, drainage back to the spleen is once again helped and made easier by gravity.

FACT; the lymph system drains all the cells in the body via movement and muscular contractions, rather than being pumped by the heart. Helping the lymph to drain to the spleen and heart with gravity is a good thing!

Very good for pregnant women

SHORT AND SWEET>>> SLEEP ON YOUR LEFT SIDE…