What is Diatomaceous Earth Used for in the Garden?


black-ant-on-leafWhat is Diatomaceous Earth Used for in the Garden?

The uses for diatomaceous earth are many but in the garden diatomaceous earth can be used as an insecticide.

Diatomaceous earth works to get rid of insects such as:

 

 

  •     Aphids
  •     Thrips
  •     Ants
  •     Mites
  •     Earwigs
  •     Bedbugs
  •     Adult Flea Beetles
  •     Cockroaches
  •     Snails
  •     Slugs

To the insects, the diatomaceous earth is a lethal dust with microscopic sharp edges that cut through the insect’s protective covering, causing them to dry out, thus killing them when they are either dusted with the diatomaceous earth or applied in a wet spray form.

One of the benefits of diatomaceous earth for insect control is that the insects it helps to control have no way to build up a resistance to the diatomaceous earth, like with many of the chemical control insecticides

How to Apply Diatomaceous Earth In The Garden: Most places where you can purchase diatomaceous earth will have complete directions on the proper application of the product. As with any pesticide, be sure to read the label thoroughly and follow the directions thereon! The directions will include how to properly apply the diatomaceous earth (DE) both in the garden and indoors for the control of many insects as well as forming a barrier of sorts against them.

In the garden diatomaceous earth may be applied as a dust with a dust applicator approved for such use; again it is of the utmost importance to wear a dust mask during application of the diatomaceous earth in this manner and leave the mask on until you have left the dusting area. Keep pets and children clear of the dusting area until the dust has settled.

In my opinion, it is better to apply the product in a wettable form to avoid the airborne dust particles problem, even then wearing a dust mask is a garden smart action to take. When using as a dust application, you will want to cover both the top and underside of all foliage with the dust. If it rains right after the dust application, it will need to be reapplied. A great time to do the dust application is right after a light rain or in the very early morning when the dew is upon the foliage as it helps the dust to stick well to the foliage.

Please make sure you do not apply where bees will be. It will kill them.

For doing the spray application of diatomaceous earth, the mix ratio is usually one (1) cup of diatomaceous earth per ½ gallon or two (2) cups per gallon of water. Keep the mix tank agitated or stir it often to keep the diatomaceous earth powder well mixed with the water. This mix may also be applied as a paint of sorts to trees and some shrubs.

This is truly an amazing product of nature for use in our gardens and around our homes. Don’t forget that it is the “Food Grade” of diatomaceous earth that we want for our gardens and home use.

Important Notice:  I recommend using  Organic Freshwater Food Grade DE in the garden just in case an animal consumes the DE. . * Any food grade diatomaceous earth uses other than those approved by the EPA, FDA, or USDA are strictly reports of what hundreds of users as well as Holistic Veterinarians have recommended.
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Super Delicious “Off the Wall” Bean Recipes #9


Super Delicious “Off the Wall” Bean Recipes #9

#9 JAPANESE HOKKAIDO AZUKI BEANS

Grown in the rich volcanic soil of Hokkaido, the cold northernmost island of Japan.

Their deep, burgundy sheen will attest to their nutritious quality and flavor.

Anko, sweet red bean paste, is used in many baked goods and sweet treats in Japan.  It is usually prepared by boiling and sometimes mashing azuki beans and then sweetening the paste with sugar.  The most common types of read bean paste include Tsubuan and Koshian.

Tsubuan is prepared by boiling and sweetening with sugar.  Koshian is prepared by passing through a sieve to remove bean skins, and this is most commonly used for wagashi (traditional Japanese confectionery).

Other varieties of anko includes Shiroan, made from Japanese white beans and Kurian made from chestnuts.

Anko is used in Anmitsu, Daifuku, Dango, Dorayaki, Oshiruko / Zenzai, Taiyaki, Manju, and Yokan.

How To Make Anko (Red Bean Paste)

Ingredients

  • 200g (7 oz, a little bit less than 1 cup which is 220g) Azuki beans (Today I used Hokkaido Dainagon Azuki Beans (bigger than regular azuki))
  • Water
  • 200g (7 oz, 1 cup) granulated white sugar
  • Pinch of salt

 

Instructions

  • Soak the azuki beans overnight (8-12 hours).
  • Rinse azuki beans.
  • Use a big saucepan/pot because the amount of azuki beans will double after cooking. Put washed azuki beans in the pot and pour water till 1-2 inch above azuki beans. Turn the heat on high.
  • When boiling, turn off the heat and cover with lid. Let it stand for 5 minutes.
  • Throw away water and put the azuki beans into a sieve.
  • Put the azuki beans back in the pot. Add enough water just to cover the beans and turn the heat on high. Once boiling, turn down the heat to medium low and keep it simmering.
  • Once in a while push the azuki beans under the water with slotted spoon. Water will evaporate so you need to keep adding water to cover just above the beans. If you put too much water, the beans will move and break. If you need to leave the kitchen, make sure to turn off the heat. Cook for 1+ hour.
  • Pick one azuki bean and squeeze it with your fingers. If it is smashes easily, it’s done.
  • Turn up the heat to high and add sugar in 3 separate times. Stirring constantly. When you draw a line on the bottom of the saucepan and see the bottom for more than 2 seconds, add salt and turn off heat. Anko will thicken more when it cools.

Anko is ready to use. If you’re not using right away, put it in an airtight container to cool down. Once it’s cooled, keep in the fridge or freezer. I recommend storing it in small 100g packages. Wrap each anko in plastic wrap and store in a Ziploc Freezer bag. Homemade anko can be stored in the fridge for a week and freezer up to a month

 

 

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DETOXING with Coffee???


You got it!!! Black Coffee..

No creamy, sugary, lactose filled, Candy Cup of coffee.

Are You A Consumer Or Connoisseur of Great Health Benefits?

 

Its all about what you put into that cup of coffee that makes it a “Good Thing” or “Bad Thing”. Science proves once again that coffee does have “Good” properties that help our bodies performance.

 

Natural detox for our bladder, kidneys, and liver.

  • Protection against cirrhosis of the liver. …
  • Lowered risk of Type 2 Diabetes. …
  • Lowered risk of Alzheimer’s disease. …
  • Reduces suicide risk and Depression. …
  • Protection against Parkinson’s. …
  • Coffee drinkers have less risk of heart disease
  •  Dementia
  •  Have fewer cases of certain cancers
  • Heart rhythm problems
  • Strokes

 

Coffee’s Surprising Health Benefits

It also packs a powerful punch of antioxidants.

In fact, you get more antioxidants from coffee than from any other food or beverage.

With just two calories per 8-ounce cup (no cream or sugar) and no fat, coffee is a pretty guilt-free way to boost your health. But don’t overdo it. More than 2 or 3 cups daily may increase your blood pressure, especially those of you with borderline or high readings.

One eight-ounce cup of regular coffee contains about:

  • 2.4 calories
  • 0 grams fat
  • 0 grams sugar
  • 0.3 grams protein
  • 0.2 milligrams vitamin B2 riboflavin (11 percent DV)
  • 0.6 milligrams pantothenic acid (6 percent DV)
  • 116 milligrams potassium (3 percent DV)
  • 0.1 milligrams manganese (3 percent DV)
  • 7.1 milligrams magnesium (2 percent DV)
  • 0.5 milligrams niacin (2 percent DV)

 

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WHAT DOES “A CUP OF JOE” MEAN TO YOU?


WHAT DOES “A CUP OF JOE” MEAN TO YOU?

Are You A Consumer Or Connoisseur of Great Health Benefits?

What is the best cup of coffee you have ever had?

by: http://www.orgnatlife.com

Well that could be a long list or a very short one. The bigger BOXED coffee shops as Star$$$$’s really does not appeal to me. Boring, run of the mill. It’s the smaller shops that actually make a good cup of coffee, or maybe it’s the atmosphere that makes it taste so good. Either way the atmosphere is comfy and inviting. Big oversized chairs to relax in and read a book or chat with others while you sip that wonderful drink.. Sounds like home.

Speaking of terminology.. Lord give me a break. If one more establishment comes up with another tongue twisting drink that takes 5 minutes to order and another 20 minutes to make, I will have to stop altogether. What ever happen to the good Old days when a cup of Joe was just that a cup of joe?

Well we are about to find out… When espresso came to America and where did espresso come from originally? Italy you say…  NO.

Espresso first appeared in Italy in the early 20th century. Coffee had already become a necessity to Italian daily life thanks to North African Muslims who brought it through Venice’s ports during the Renaissance. We owe much of the mystique coffee to Venetian merchants who charged wealthy patrons hefty sums to try out this newfangled drink when the first coffeehouses opened in the 1640’s.

Fast forward about 200 years and we find business man Luigi Bezzera tinkering away with this coffee pot to find a way to make coffee faster. In 1903, Bezzera owned a manufacturing business and was frustrated by the time-consuming process of brewing his own coffee at home each morning.

He soon found that adding steam pressure to the machine not only cut down on the brewing process but also produced a stronger, more robust cup of coffee. This new quick-brew process drew out the coffee bean’s best qualities but somehow avoided over extraction.

Bezzera immediately named his invention the “Fast Coffee Machine”. Since the word ‘espresso’ means fast in Italian, the name of the beverage the machine produced was quickly shortened to what we know today.

Unfortunately, Bezzera wasn’t as talented at marketing and sales as he was at engineering. In 1905, another businessman named Desidero Pavoni purchased the machine’s rights from Bezzera and had it patented.

Nowadays you don’t have to travel to Italy to experience Bezzera’s handiwork. The recent boom in espresso’s popularity has brought this Italian treat to every mall and street corner. Next time you decide to pick one up, take a moment to think about the more than 100 years of history inside your cup.

BREWING…

There are several ways to brew the black magic. Easy, put the water in and walk away to grinding, tampering, brewing and mixing the syrups to get that special taste.

For myself I threw out the Drip coffee maker and opted for the french press carafe. To have a rich full bodied aroma wafting through the house is like a beautiful melody running through your mind over and over.

I still say the best was the Percolator, back in the day. I can remember my grandma making coffee on the stove. Watching the coffee going up into the glass bubble on top and back down again, becoming darker in color each time it reached the bubble. Then the electric percolator my mom used was the highlight of the 60’s. Same technique just plug it in and watch it go.. No more standing by the stove and waiting for that perfect cup of coffee.

The Automatic drip machine came into the light. Wow everyone thought this was the BOMB.. Yes it gave you your pot of coffee in 5 minutes. But where was that rich wafting aroma? Gone with the 5 minute cup.

Then we step up to the home brew station for espresso. Ohh, what magic we have in our possession. Soon every house had an espresso machine big and small.

The latest is the One Cup Brew machine. Bringing you pre-made espresso in 50 flavors with no hassle or mess. Every day is a coffee rainbow.

Have fun and try a different blend and technique today…. You might be surprised at the difference a “Technique” actually makes.

Don’t forget about the health benefits of coffee. Black Coffee, not that candy coated crud or Super Hype added extract.

Please!!! Regular black coffee is just fine for me.

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